Search results

1 – 10 of over 10000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Emaj Uddin

Social stress and alcohol/arrack drinking are interrelated and vary across the sub cultures or cultures around the world. This study aims to examine relationships between…

Abstract

Purpose

Social stress and alcohol/arrack drinking are interrelated and vary across the sub cultures or cultures around the world. This study aims to examine relationships between social stress and arrack drinking patterns among Muslim, Hindu, Santaland Oraon communities in Rasulpur of Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted in Rasulpur of Bangladesh. In this region arrack produced from palm and date juice and arrack drinker of four ethnic communities is available round the year. Out of 760 male arrack drinkers, 391 samples (109 Muslim, 103 Hindu, 89 Santal and 90 Oraon) were randomly selected and were interviewed with semi‐structural questionnaire.

Findings

The results of multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed that there were significant differences in and relationships between social stress and arrack drinking pattern among the communities studied. Results suggested that the 2‐35 times higher risks of Hindu and Muslim's social stressors than the Santal and Oraon were significantly related to their arrack drinking pattern.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings of this study have been successful in understanding cross‐cultural variations in and relationships between social stress and arrack drinking patterns among the ethnic communities, further empirical study is needed into how coping or social support influence the relationships between the variables studied. In spite of this the findings may apply in formulating social policy and programs to reduce arrack drinking in the context of social stress in rural Bangladesh.

Originality/value

This paper is original in linking of theory, policy and practice in the context of social stress at reducing arrack drinking pattern in rural Bangladesh.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gallus Bischof, Nikolaus Lange, Hans Juergen Rumpf and Ulrich W. Preuss

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the scientific evidence for reduced drinking in alcohol use disorders. While the aim of alcohol use disorders (AUD…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the scientific evidence for reduced drinking in alcohol use disorders. While the aim of alcohol use disorders (AUD) treatment usually focuses on abstinence, only a minority of individuals with AUD enter treatment. Lack of alternative treatment goals, including reduced drinking instead of abstinence, have been identified as a potential barrier for treatment entry. Epidemiological and treatment outcome studies reveal that a large proportion of individuals with AUD are able to substantially reduce their alcohol intake for a prolonged duration of time.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review of the literature on prevalence rates and health effects as well as evidence-based approaches fostering reduced drinking in individuals with AUD is presented.

Findings

Reduced drinking is associated with improvements in both morbidity and mortality. Research has identified evidence-based psychosocial and pharmacological treatment approaches; however, implementation is still scarce.

Originality/value

Target groups for interventions fostering drinking reduction instead of abstinence are defined and desiderata for further research are outlined.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Emma Dresler and Margaret Anderson

Young adult’s drinking is about pleasure, a communal practice of socialising together in a friendship group. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the evolving…

Abstract

Purpose

Young adult’s drinking is about pleasure, a communal practice of socialising together in a friendship group. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the evolving support practices of drinking groups for better targeting of health communications messages.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative descriptive study examined the narratives of 28 young people’s (age 18-24 years old) experience of a “night out” framed as the Alcohol Consumption Journey.

Findings

The Alcohol Consumption Journey ritual consisted of three phases: preloading, going out and recovery. The participants described multiple forms of support practices located at each phase of the Alcohol Consumption Journey for maximising pleasure, minimising risk, encouraging supportive behaviours, enhancing group cohesion and protecting the drinkers from alcohol-related harm. Hence, support practices played a critical part in constituting and consolidating the drinking group. While the support practices appeared to be structured into the Alcohol Consumption Journey, they were activated differently for young men and young women. Support practices were an important driver in perpetuating the Alcohol Consumption Journey.

Originality/value

The paper extends Vander Ven’s concept of “drunk support” to better understand young adults’ evolving support practices in the ritualised Alcohol Consumption Journey.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Katrina Elizabeth Champion, Emma Louise Barrett, Tim Slade, Maree Teesson and Nicola Clare Newton

Alcohol and cannabis are the two most commonly used substances by young people in many developed nations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the longitudinal…

Abstract

Purpose

Alcohol and cannabis are the two most commonly used substances by young people in many developed nations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the longitudinal relationships between risky substance use (binge drinking and cannabis use) and psychological distress, emotional and behavioural difficulties, and truancy among Australian adolescents.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 527 students (Mage=13.4 years, SD=0.43; 67 per cent female) from seven Australian schools completed an online self-report survey on four occasions over two years (baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months). The survey assessed binge drinking (5+ standard drinks on one occasion), cannabis use in the past six months, psychological distress, emotional and behavioural difficulties (Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire), and truancy. Generalised estimating equations (GEEs) were conducted to examine the longitudinal relationship between the substance use outcomes and each predictor variable.

Findings

At baseline, 3 per cent of students reported binge drinking and 6 per cent had used cannabis in the past six months. Rates of binge drinking significantly increased over time (21.1 per cent at 24 months) however, rates of cannabis use remained relatively stable (8.8 per cent at 24 months). Multivariate GEE analyses indicated that higher levels of hyperactivity/inattention, more days of truancy and being female were independently and consistently associated with binge drinking over time. Conduct problems was the only factor to be independently associated with cannabis use over time.

Originality/value

These findings provide valuable information about psychosocial risk factors for harmful alcohol and cannabis use. A better understanding of these associations is critical for informing substance use prevention efforts in the future.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Clive Tobutt and Raffaella Milani

The aim of this randomised intervention study was to test the use of two counselling styles in reducing alcohol consumption in offenders who were hazardous drinkers and…

Abstract

The aim of this randomised intervention study was to test the use of two counselling styles in reducing alcohol consumption in offenders who were hazardous drinkers and who had been charged with alcohol‐related offences. An additional aim was to evaluate the research process itself before embarking on a larger trial. Participants were recruited from a police custody suite in the south east of England and randomised to receive either a motivational interviewing brief intervention (MIBI) or a standard brief intervention (BI). The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) was used to screen offenders for hazardous drinking. Participants were asked to complete a second AUDIT 12 weeks later. Two hundred offenders with alcohol‐related offences were screened over a 10‐month period. Of these, 182 were alcohol dependent and were therefore excluded from the study. Of the 18 who were eligible to enter the study, six refused to participate. Five were randomised to the MIBI group and seven into the BI group (BI). The mean age of the MIBI group was 25 (SD±3.86) years and the mean age of the BI group was 32.4 (SD±7.9). Audit scores were significantly lower at time 2 compared to time 1 for both intervention groups (t(11) = 17.60; p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the different intervention groups.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Emily Fulton, Darrin Baines and Naomi Bartle

Parental beliefs about underage drinking are known to influence the drinking behaviours of their children. The purpose of this paper is to explore parental beliefs about…

Abstract

Purpose

Parental beliefs about underage drinking are known to influence the drinking behaviours of their children. The purpose of this paper is to explore parental beliefs about their own child drinking alcohol and young people in general, in order to ascertain whether there is a need to target such beliefs in the design of public health interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

Parents of 11–18 year olds attending one of nine schools in the Midlands of England, UK were invited to take part. Participants completed a newly designed 40-item questionnaire measuring parental beliefs about the impact and causes of underage drinking; talking to their child about alcohol; and how much and how often they thought their child consumed alcohol.

Findings

In total, 185 parents took part in the study, reporting on their eldest child aged 18 or under. The majority of parents agreed that underage drinking is detrimental to child health and wellbeing. However, over 60 per cent believed that alcohol consumption is a “natural part of growing up”, and stronger agreement with this belief was associated with higher parental reports of alcohol consumption in their children.

Social implications

The majority of parents recognised the risks and negative effects of alcohol; however, many also believe it is a natural part of growing up. Parents may hold conflicting beliefs about underage drinking, which could impact on the drinking beliefs and behaviours of their children.

Originality/value

Public health interventions may need to counter the common parental belief that underage drinking is a normal part of growing up and therefore to be expected. Clear messages about the impact parent beliefs and behaviour have on young people drinking, to ensure parents recognise that messages are aimed at themselves, and not just “other parents” are imperative.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Christos Kouimtsidis, Daniel Stahl, Robert West and Colin Drummond

The purpose of this paper is to review the substance misuse literature on how outcome expectancies are measured, how they are related with the level of use and other…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the substance misuse literature on how outcome expectancies are measured, how they are related with the level of use and other factors as well as their role into treatment and recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review of the literature for all major substances of abuse was undertaken.

Findings

Existing measurement tools are substance specific. Most research has been in the field of alcohol, and involved students or light and moderate drinkers. Positive expectancies have been found to be related to initiation and level of alcohol, nicotine and cannabis use and also to be modifiable with repeated cue exposure. Negative expectancies have been found to be associated with prevention of smoking, positive changes in drinking and positive effect on treatment outcome for alcohol.

Research limitations/implications

Both positive and negative outcome expectancies have been found to predict development of substance misuse and recovery from it respectively, but cross-substance comparisons are hindered by lack of appropriate measures.

Originality/value

The concept of outcome expectancies is present in several theories of addiction. To date there has been no comprehensive review of the extent to which different types of expectancy play a role in different substances and their treatment.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Content available
Article

Nhat Van Trieu, Penpaktr Uthis and Sunisa Suktrakul

To study the situation of alcohol relapse and to investigate the relationship between psychological factors and alcohol relapse in persons with alcohol dependence in Thai…

Abstract

Purpose

To study the situation of alcohol relapse and to investigate the relationship between psychological factors and alcohol relapse in persons with alcohol dependence in Thai Nguyen hospitals, Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

A correlation study was conducted among 110 patients. Data were collected through structured interviews and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman's correlation coefficient (rs).

Findings

More than two-thirds of the participants were found to relapse more than once (X¯ = 2.04, SD = 0.86). Positive outcome expectancies, cravings, negative emotional states, and maladaptive coping were positively associated with relapse (rs = 0.550, 0.522, 0.497; p = 0.000 and rs = 0.217, p < 0.05, respectively). While, motivation to change with three subscales had a negative correlation to relapse including recognition (rs = −0.199, p < 0.05), ambivalence (rs = −0.331, p = 0.000), and taking steps (rs = −0.606, p = 0.000). Adaptive coping, self-efficacy, and social support were also found to be negatively correlated to relapse (rs = −0.535, −0.499, −0.338; p = 0.000, respectively). However, negative outcome expectancies (rs = −0.024, p = 0.805) and positive emotional states (rs = 0.081, p = 0.399) were not significantly related to relapse.

Practical implications

The findings of this study are significant implications for relapse prevention strategies. It suggests that the essential parts of relapse prevention are through: changing alcohol expectations, increase drinking refusal self-efficacy, coping skills training, enhancing motivation to change, managing alcohol craving and expanding social support.

Originality/value

This is the first study in Vietnam which investigated the relationship between psychological factors and alcohol relapse in individuals with alcohol dependence.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ranjan Datta and Margot Hurlbert

The purpose of this paper is to reveal gaps in knowledge about energy industries, federal and provincial governments and indigenous communities’ energy management policies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal gaps in knowledge about energy industries, federal and provincial governments and indigenous communities’ energy management policies and practices, as well as to highlight areas requiring further research and knowledge development.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a scoping review framework according to scoping methodological framework.

Findings

This paper suggests that researchers need to examine Indigenous communities on past leaks response records, pipelines leaks impacts in their health and environment and current risk management processes and regulations to identify weaknesses. This review paper also suggests that significant time will be required to meaningfully and honestly engage with communities to move from acceptance, through approval, to co-ownership of the project as the firm builds its legitimacy, credibility and trust with Indigenous communities.

Originality/value

The authors introduce an original approach to scoping methodological framework that directly addresses the processes of reveal gaps in knowledge and practice. It offers researchers, policy-makers, community and practitioners an alternative approach which is culturally appropriate for improving economic and environmental health outcomes of marginalised groups.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

A. Wren Montgomery, Thomas P. Lyon and Dan Zhao

As demands on global water resources intensify, battles are emerging over water ownership and governance. Evidence to support opposing views is scarce, however, especially…

Abstract

As demands on global water resources intensify, battles are emerging over water ownership and governance. Evidence to support opposing views is scarce, however, especially with respect to the impact of ownership on water quality. Using a data set of 168,823 municipal water systems in the United States from 2010 to 2014, we find evidence that stakeholder attention moderates the effect of ownership on compliance with drinking water quality standards. Private systems’ compliance improves more rapidly with system size, consistent with greater social movement pressure, while public systems’ compliance improves more rapidly with local educational attainment, consistent with greater responsiveness to stakeholder attention and concern.

Details

Social Movements, Stakeholders and Non-Market Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-349-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 10000