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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Jacqueline M. Torres, Annie Ro and May Sudhinaraset

Age at migration is commonly utilized as a proxy measure for assimilation in health behavior research. We reconsider this approach by examining the role of continued…

Abstract

Age at migration is commonly utilized as a proxy measure for assimilation in health behavior research. We reconsider this approach by examining the role of continued connection with places of origin on alcohol use, an important marker of health behavior and overall population health. Cross-border connections may buffer the association between earlier age at migration and alcohol use by providing an alternative channel of influence for behavioral norms. Alternatively, a stress and coping perspective on cross-border ties suggests potentially countervailing adverse impacts of these connections on alcohol use. We used data from the 2002/2003 National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) (n = 1,641/1,630 Asian and Latino origin respondents, respectively). We first estimated the association between age at migration (child/adolescent versus adult migrant) and any past-year alcohol use. We subsequently tested the interaction between age at migration and two measures of cross-border connections. All models were stratified by region of origin and gender. For Latin American-origin women, cross-border ties were associated with increased risk of past-year alcohol use among those who migrated early in life. In contrast, Asian-origin men and women who migrated as adults and had contact with family and friends abroad had the lowest predicted probabilities of past-year alcohol use. The results among Asians support the idea that cross-border ties may be alternative influences on health behavior outcomes, particularly for adult migrants. Overall, we find qualified support for both transnational and assimilationist perspectives on alcohol use behaviors among US immigrants – as well as the interaction between these two frameworks. The joint influences of cross-border ties and age at migration were observed primarily for immigrant women, and not always in expected directions. We nevertheless urge future research to consider both US and country of origin influences on a wider range of health and health behavior outcomes for immigrants, as well as the potential intersection between US and cross-border connections.

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Immigration and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-062-4

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Melissa A. Menasco

Purpose – This research presents results concerning the impact of family financial stress on adolescent substance use.Design/methodology/approach – Drawing a sample of…

Abstract

Purpose – This research presents results concerning the impact of family financial stress on adolescent substance use.

Design/methodology/approach – Drawing a sample of 18,614 adolescent males (9,459) and females (9,155) ages 12–17 years from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this work utilizes stepwise logistic regression and ordinary least squares to determine whether family poverty measures are associated with adolescent high-risk behaviors of smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, and using marijuana.

Findings – This study found limited support for adolescent substance use within families who are experiencing economic distress. Adolescents from families who had moved at least once in the prior year were more likely to have used cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana. Furthermore, males and females who disapprove of peers’ substance using behaviors are less likely to use those substances.

Research limitations/implications – This study may not explain adolescent substance using behavior outside of the United States. Further research into socioeconomic factors should be addressed in subsequent work as should the intermediary variables pertaining to the parent–child relationship.

Practical implications – Understanding contributing factors to adolescent substance use will assist in developing social policy that will support families.

Originality/value – This study provides insight into the consequences of family characteristics both socioeconomic and psychosocial which influence adolescent substance using behaviors.

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Economic Stress and the Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-978-3

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Article

Tore Bonsaksen, Trond Heir, Laila Skogstad, Tine K. Grimholt, Øivind Ekeberg, Anners Lerdal and Inger Schou-Bredal

Harmful use of alcohol is a major public health problem. While harm is often researched in the context of heavy drinking episodes, high-frequency drinking, even when…

Abstract

Purpose

Harmful use of alcohol is a major public health problem. While harm is often researched in the context of heavy drinking episodes, high-frequency drinking, even when drinking moderate quantities, constitutes a health risk in a longer perspective. The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of daily use of alcohol in the Norwegian general population and to assess sociodemographic, mental health-related and personal resource variables associated with daily use of alcohol.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey concerned with health, illness and serious life events was distributed to 5,500 persons in the general population in Norway (response rate 36%). Sociodemographic variables, personal resource variables (general self-efficacy, optimism and extraversion) and psychological distress (current anxiety and/or depression) were assessed with regards to their associations with daily drinking in unadjusted and adjusted regression models.

Findings

Daily use of alcohol was reported by 39 persons (2.2%) in the sample (3.1% of men and 1.4% of women). While general self-efficacy, optimism and extraversion were unrelated to daily drinking, the adjusted model revealed that male sex (OR: 2.18, p < 0.05), being unemployed/not in education (OR: 3.10, p < 0.05) and reporting current anxiety and/or depression (OR: 3.12, p < 0.01) were associated with daily use of alcohol.

Originality/value

The study has contributed to the knowledge about daily drinkers in a representative sample of the Norwegian population. A proportion of 2.2% was found to drink alcohol on a daily basis. Compared to their counterparts, the odds of daily drinking were higher for men, unemployed persons and persons reporting current psychological distress. Public health initiatives aiming at reducing harmful use of alcohol may pay particular attention to these subsets of the population.

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article

Philip Cooper

This article highlights the need to provide interventions to those with mental health problems who also use alcohol or illicit substances. It identifies a group‐work…

Abstract

This article highlights the need to provide interventions to those with mental health problems who also use alcohol or illicit substances. It identifies a group‐work package that aims to increase individuals' awareness of their use of substances, the impact this use may have upon their mental health and encourages a change in their behaviour to reduce the risk of alcohol or illicit drug related harm.

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article

Louise Elizabeth Birrell, Nicola Clare Newton, Lexine Stapinski, Katrina Prior, Katrina Elizabeth Champion, Clare J. Mackie, Maree Teesson and Tim Slade

The purpose of this paper is to explore how different trajectories of emotional symptoms relate to alcohol use in adolescence.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how different trajectories of emotional symptoms relate to alcohol use in adolescence.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 431 participants (majority female), aged approximately 13 years at baseline were followed over three years and reported on their emotional symptoms and alcohol use. Latent class growth analyses explored different trajectories of emotional symptoms and regression models were run to relate these trajectories to alcohol use (full standard drink, and binge drinking) at 36-month follow-up (age 16 years).

Findings

While the majority of adolescents were best characterised by low-stable emotional symptoms, those with high-stable symptoms were more likely to be have consumed a full standard drink of alcohol and binge drunk when aged 16 years.

Research limitations/implications

Findings highlight the importance of prevention and early intervention, particularly targeting adolescents with elevated stable emotional symptoms who were more likely to be using alcohol at 16 years of age.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first longitudinal investigations into the use of alcohol by community adolescents with different emotional symptom trajectories.

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Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article

Sibuiso Sifunda, Priscilla S. Reddy, Ronald B. Braithwaite, Torrence Stephens, Sibusisiwe Bhengu, Robert AC Ruiter and Bart H.W. Van Den Borne

To examine a possible link between substance use and risky sexual behaviour, a cross‐sectional study was conducted among 357 inmates across four South African prisons…

Abstract

To examine a possible link between substance use and risky sexual behaviour, a cross‐sectional study was conducted among 357 inmates across four South African prisons involved in a pre‐release intervention programme for parolees. About 93% of the participants reported using alcohol and 52% used marijuana prior to imprisonment, while 56% reported previous occurrence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Logistic regression analyses explored the impact of substance use on intention to reduce risky sexual behaviour. Age and inconsistent use of condoms were positively associated with having an STI prior to incarceration, while reported alcohol and marijuana intake had no effect. Never using condoms before was highly associated with lower intention to engage in preventive behaviours upon release. It can be concluded that inmates demonstrate high levels of substance use and engagement in risky sexual behaviours. Targeted pre‐release substance abuse interventions are essential to reduce the burden of disease amongst offenders.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article

Marc Dupuis, Stéphanie Baggio, Marion Emilie Accard, Meichun Mohler-Kuo and Gerhard Gmel

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between alcohol abstinence and illicit drug use during early adulthood, and compares abstinence to moderate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between alcohol abstinence and illicit drug use during early adulthood, and compares abstinence to moderate drinking and binge drinking, regrouped in different frequencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 5,968 young male adults who completed the questionnaires were selected for the analyses. Alcohol abstinent participants were compared to moderate drinkers (who did not experience binge drinking during the previous 12 months), and casual, monthly, weekly and daily binge drinkers in terms of prevalence of drug use during early adulthood.

Findings

Alcohol abstinence was associated with higher risks of drug use than moderate drinking (odds ratio (OR)>3) for most of drugs, especially last-stage drugs: crystal meth, solvents, spice and heroin (6.50<OR<13.50). Such findings encourage rethinking prevention among alcohol abstainers who were so far considered at low risk of drug use.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of the study are the fact that it is cross-sectional, gender-blind and focussing on Swiss native who are less vulnerable than migrants.

Practical implications

High-risk subjects should be identified among young people who do not drink in order to develop specific preventive interventions.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first that compare alcohol abstinence, moderate drinking and binge drinking. Separate results covering 15 different drugs are presented.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article

Maria Eugenia Fernandez, Lilian Daset, Wouter Vanderplasschen, Cesar Daniel Costa Ball, Lore Van Damme and Sofie Vindevogel

The purpose of this paper is to explore risk and protective factors for alcohol use among school-going adolescents in Montevideo (Uruguay).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore risk and protective factors for alcohol use among school-going adolescents in Montevideo (Uruguay).

Design/methodology/approach

A self-report survey was administered to 331 school-going adolescents in Montevideo (Uruguay) (Mage=13; SD=0.05), using the alcohol screening instrument of the Uruguayan National Drug Board to assess adolescents’ alcohol use (yes/no), a screening instrument for psychopathology and resilience (the adolescent self-report) and a socio-demographic questionnaire.

Findings

Logistic regression analyses identified antisocial behaviour, substance use and negative emotionality (F2), disruptive and dysregulated behaviour (F8), higher age and recent death of a close relative as risk factors, while the number of close friends was identified as a protective factor for past year alcohol use (yes/no). No straightforward relationship was found between schools and the risk for the past year alcohol use. In addition, age, F2, F8 and recent death of a close relative appeared to be the most robust predictors.

Research limitations/implications

The study was the first in Uruguay to relate adolescents’ alcohol use to risk and protective factors. Given the cross-sectional nature of the study, causal relationships could not be determined.

Originality/value

The study provides preliminary recommendations for policy makers and other stakeholders involved in youth affairs on core elements to focus on school-, community- and family-based alcohol prevention programmes for adolescents.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article

Madison Wyn Silverstein, Rebecca L. Fix and Apryl A. Alexander

Risky sexual behavior (RSB) on college campuses contributes to elevated rates of sexually transmitted infections and sexual assault. Research indicates a positive…

Abstract

Purpose

Risky sexual behavior (RSB) on college campuses contributes to elevated rates of sexually transmitted infections and sexual assault. Research indicates a positive association between sexual victimization history (SVH) and RSB with alcohol use and sexual sensation seeking as mediators to this association. Hypermasculinity has also been shown to play a moderating role amongst these associations. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to test the associations between RSB, SVH, alcohol use, sexual sensation seeking, and hypermasculinity.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 493 undergraduates who completed measures of RSB, SVH, alcohol use, sexual sensation seeking, and hypermasculinity. A moderated mediation model was run examining the association between SVH and RSB, with alcohol use and sexual sensation seeking tested as mediators of the relationship between SVH and RSB. In addition, hypermasculinity was tested as a moderator of the mediated relationship between SVH and the aforementioned mediator variables.

Findings

Alcohol use and sexual sensation seeking partially mediated the association between SVH and RSB. Masculinity moderated the association between SVH and RSB via sexual sensation seeking and between SVH and RSB via alcohol use.

Research limitations/implications

Individuals with SVH might be at a higher risk for alcohol use and sexual sensation seeking, ultimately increasing their risk for RSB. University policy implications include implementing alcohol use and awareness interventions, strengthening sexual victimization policies, and including screenings for SVH at counseling and medical centers.

Originality/value

Previous findings were extended by showing how SVH leads to RSB.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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