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1 – 10 of over 9000
Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Cathy Atkinson, George Thomas and Sarah Parry

Motivational interviewing (MI) has developed considerably since its inception, which may have led to diverse practice across contexts and differential understanding of…

Abstract

Purpose

Motivational interviewing (MI) has developed considerably since its inception, which may have led to diverse practice across contexts and differential understanding of core principles. Concept mapping is one potential method for offering insight into practitioner awareness, understanding and application of MI. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 29 professionals from a range of disciplines, including counselling, education and health, completed concept maps about MI, following brief training at the UK regional MI interest network. In total, 17 completed maps were submitted for analysis using quantitative and qualitative methods.

Findings

A total of 186 concepts and 175 propositional links were found within the 17 maps. The most commonly identified concepts were: change, empathy, collaboration, open-ended questions, affirmations, reflections, summaries (OARS), client centred and compassion. The concept maps also suggested differing levels of expertise across network members using concept mapping morphology classification.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was small scale and located in one region of the UK. Maps were submitted anonymously meaning that participant data could not be matched to the maps.

Practical implications

Concept mapping is a potentially useful method for auditing practice and developing skills in MI, as well as exploring participants’ understanding of related concepts and therapeutic mechanisms.

Social implications

MI has a strong evidence-based across a variety of disciplines and contexts. Refining practitioner skills in MI has implications for the integrity of delivery, and improved client outcomes in areas such as substance use, health promotion and educational disaffection.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate concept mapping as a means of understanding MI practice. It has potential implications for training, monitoring, supervision and development in MI practice.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Rosemary Kent

Practitioners working within alcohol and other drug services are often delighted when they ‘discover’ motivational interviewing (MI). Some regard it as confirmation of a…

Abstract

Practitioners working within alcohol and other drug services are often delighted when they ‘discover’ motivational interviewing (MI). Some regard it as confirmation of a style they believe they are using already, while others see it as representing a radically different approach. Whatever the response, no one can argue that MI is one of the most influential developments to hit social care in decades. Rosemary Kent explains why it has had such an impact and describes how it can be applied to almost all areas of support.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2013

Anita J. Green and Alexandra J. Joy

The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of a small, early-stage feasibility project that used a motivational interviewing (MI) informed intervention on a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of a small, early-stage feasibility project that used a motivational interviewing (MI) informed intervention on a psychiatric intensive care unit (PICU).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes a MI informed intervention implemented on a PICU for service users who use cannabis. The intervention was evaluated using a feedback questionnaire post intervention. Due to the small number of service users (n=5) in the first cohort there is limited narrative and quantitative data available.

Findings

The project raised awareness for staff of the potential usefulness of applying MI informed interventions in a PICU setting. All participants stated the intervention should continue to be offered after the project. The intervention needs to be further developed with the possibility of it being used on an acute open ward environment with a larger cohort and consider the use of a randomised-controlled trial approach to validate the results.

Research limitations/implications

The small cohort (n=5) used for this feasibility project and the evaluation limited the opportunity to make general conclusions and recommendations. However, the learning gained can be applied to future applications.

Practical implications

Practitioners can consistently apply the MI informed intervention using templates as a guide when providing drug urine screening results.

Originality/value

The intervention is a novel approach. The authors found no literature on incorporating MI principles and skills with providing drug urine screening results on a PICU; the paper helps to address this dearth of clinical examples.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2022

Aimee Riedel, Rory Mulcahy, Amanda Beatson and Byron Keating

This paper aims to report on the first comprehensive, social marketing systematic review of interventions targeting illicit drug use by young adults.

1084

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the first comprehensive, social marketing systematic review of interventions targeting illicit drug use by young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 3,169 papers were screened, with 20 relevant empirical studies meeting the eligibility criteria for the systematic review. These were analysed according to Andreasen’s (2002) and NSMC’s (2006) social marketing benchmarks.

Findings

The findings provide evidence regarding the efficacy of behavioural and clinical interventions targeting individuals and groups, including motivational, life skills training, cognitive behavioural therapy, comprehensive health and social risk assessments and buprenorphine treatment interventions. Further, results evidence that there is yet to be an intervention which has implemented the full marketing mix, and limited studies have used the social marketing benchmarks of exchange and competition.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to conduct a comprehensive systematic review and provide key recommendations outlining the potential for social marketing to support the improved uptake and efficacy of interventions. A research agenda is also put forward to direct future social marketing scholarship in the area of young adult drug interventions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Brian Wansink

Inside sources are people who interact with target consumers on a frequent or intense basis. They can have powerful insights about why consumers behave as they do. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Inside sources are people who interact with target consumers on a frequent or intense basis. They can have powerful insights about why consumers behave as they do. This paper aims to focus on how to identify, interview and leverage inside sources to uncover new insights about target consumers and how to better engage with them.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides field-tested techniques on how to elicit the most useful insights from inside sources. The paper demonstrates how the generated insights can be used for everything from more precise targeting and message development to modifying products and services to increase loyalty, usage frequency or switching behavior.

Findings

Generating novel insights about a unique target market involves four steps: identify, locate, interview inside sources and then apply the insights.

Research limitations/implications

There can be limitations to interviewing inside sources, such as interviewer bias, respondent bias and the Hawthorne effect. Some individuals react differently to different events, and some insights are not generalizable.

Practical implications

Costly wide-scale surveys, laddering interviews or focus groups are not always needed to uncover insights about target consumers. Within 24 hours, inside sources can produce the insights needed to better market products, develop research questions or design interventions.

Originality/value

Generating novel insights about a unique target market can be done quickly and inexpensively. It involves leveraging inside sources – those people who interact frequently or intensively with target consumers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2022

Jacqui Horsburgh

Abstract

Details

Improving Outcomes for Looked after Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-078-8

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2016

Morten Hesse and Birgitte Thylstrup

This article presents the Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling program, a time-limited psychoeducational approach to increasing patient awareness of antisocial personality…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents the Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling program, a time-limited psychoeducational approach to increasing patient awareness of antisocial personality disorder and its consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

This article describes the ILC program, a program developed as an add-on to treatment for substance use disorders, gives examples of issues and patient-counsellor interactions in the ILC sessions.

Findings

During the ILC sessions the patients engaged with the counsellors in diverse ways, reflecting the varying levels of psychopathology and overall functioning and barriers and incentive for lifestyle changes.

Originality/value

Patients with substance use disorder and comorbid antisocial personality disorder can receive better care with brief counselling that focuses on antisocial behavior and thinking. More diverse evidence-based treatments are needed for this disorder.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 9 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

Sixtus Dane Asuncion Ramos

The Philippines’ nationwide campaign on drugs has been under the limelight due to its controversial approaches in dealing with the problem of addiction. Despite the…

Abstract

Purpose

The Philippines’ nationwide campaign on drugs has been under the limelight due to its controversial approaches in dealing with the problem of addiction. Despite the government’s current efforts, substance use disorders continue to persist within the population. The purpose of this paper is to provide recommendations for addressing the issue of substance use disorder treatment through a modification of the therapeutic community (TC) in the Philippine context.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper reviews the existing facts about the Philippines’ campaign against drugs, the approaches implemented by the government, current state and research developments of TCs, and its resulting impact on contemporary evidence-based treatment for addiction in the country.

Findings

A treatment framework outlining a recovery-oriented therapeutic community (ROTC) is presented. The ROTC aims to address addiction as a chronic, relapsing disease. This alternative approach for addiction treatment in the Philippines is based on the concept of recovery, principles of effective substance use disorder treatment, and recent developments in TC best practices from the international community.

Originality/value

This paper discusses different recommendations for policy development, interventions and research, aimed at improving the odds of securing recovery for people suffering from addiction.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Xiaoyun Zhou, Matthew Bambling and Sisira Edirippulige

Eating disorders (EDs) is a major health condition affecting 9% of the global population and 10% of those with EDs lost their lives as a result. Text-based telehealth…

Abstract

Purpose

Eating disorders (EDs) is a major health condition affecting 9% of the global population and 10% of those with EDs lost their lives as a result. Text-based telehealth interventions (TTIs) seem to provide a low-cost and convenient treatment option; however, the evidence is scarce. This study aimed to synthesize evidence relating to the use of TTIs for the management of EDs.

Design/methodology/approach

Five databases were searched published between January 2020 and May 2019. The authors used keywords relating to telehealth and EDs. The authors used Joanna Briggs Institute's (JBI's) critical appraisal instrument to assess the methodology quality of included studies.

Findings

Fifteen studies were included in this mix-method systematic review and assessed for methodology quality. Email, web-based texting, text-messaging and online chat room were used as mode for deliver healthcare for patients with EDs. In the treatment phase, all studies (nine studies; n = 860 participants) showed effectiveness (for RCTs) and usefulness (for non-RCT studies). In the aftercare phase (six studies; n = 364 participants), the results regarding the effectiveness of TTIs were mixed. Two studies showed effectiveness whilst four studies did not find statistically significant change of ED outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The qualities of these studies varied; firstly, 66% (n = 10) of the studies were non-randomized studies (e.g. single-arm trial, case report) with small samples. Moreover, one-fourth (n = 4) of the studies did not use validated instruments or indicate the instrument. Also, half (n = 7) of the studies used TTIs as adjunct to face-to-face treatment or bigger online treatment, it is hard to make conclusion that the changes were due to TTIs' effect. In addition, follow-up rate is not satisfactory, thus results should be interpreted cautiously.

Practical implications

TTIs seem to be promising for management of EDs, particularly in the treatment phase. This provides an important treatment option for health practitioners and people with EDs as an alternative or in adjunct with face-to-face services.

Originality/value

This is the first review to synthesis the use of TTIs for ED management.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Clive Tobutt and Raffaella Milani

The aim of this randomised intervention study was to test the use of two counselling styles in reducing alcohol consumption in offenders who were hazardous drinkers and…

Abstract

The aim of this randomised intervention study was to test the use of two counselling styles in reducing alcohol consumption in offenders who were hazardous drinkers and who had been charged with alcohol‐related offences. An additional aim was to evaluate the research process itself before embarking on a larger trial. Participants were recruited from a police custody suite in the south east of England and randomised to receive either a motivational interviewing brief intervention (MIBI) or a standard brief intervention (BI). The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) was used to screen offenders for hazardous drinking. Participants were asked to complete a second AUDIT 12 weeks later. Two hundred offenders with alcohol‐related offences were screened over a 10‐month period. Of these, 182 were alcohol dependent and were therefore excluded from the study. Of the 18 who were eligible to enter the study, six refused to participate. Five were randomised to the MIBI group and seven into the BI group (BI). The mean age of the MIBI group was 25 (SD±3.86) years and the mean age of the BI group was 32.4 (SD±7.9). Audit scores were significantly lower at time 2 compared to time 1 for both intervention groups (t(11) = 17.60; p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the different intervention groups.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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