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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Donna J. Cunningham

While the debate about the value of teaching multiculturalism has continued, recent political events have made the task more difficult. University students affected by these…

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Abstract

While the debate about the value of teaching multiculturalism has continued, recent political events have made the task more difficult. University students affected by these events are likely to bring prejudices with them to the classroom. This article presents steps that an individual Instructor can take to apply multicultural education to an existing curriculum without systemic change to institution or curriculum. The topic is addressed in the context of a US Legal Environment of Business course. Multicultural education is defined and explained, and causes of prejudice are explored. Reactions to terrorism are addressed. Assignments, projects and strategies are presented. The article concludes with a business perspective on the value of multicultural education and its role in economic development, which will be a necessary component to eradicate the causes of terrorism.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Donna J. Cunningham and Rajesh Iyer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the changing legal landscape associated with the growth of advertising of prescription drugs directly to the consumer, and makes…

1038

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the changing legal landscape associated with the growth of advertising of prescription drugs directly to the consumer, and makes recommendations designed to assist advertisers in avoiding legal liability based on those advertisements.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates the phenomenal growth of DTC advertising since 1997, when a profound change in the FDA regulations took effect. These changes permitted advertisers significantly more flexibility in providing information about the advertised drug directly to the consumer. Since then, however, DTC advertising has repeatedly come under attack. A review of the literature, changing law, and other factors, reveals the primary criticisms of DTC advertising, and its tendency to expose pharmaceutical advertisers to legal liability.

Findings

The paper recounts the development of the law concerning pharmaceutical advertising, and particularly, the application of the Learned Intermediary Rule. Previously, this Rule operated to shield pharmaceutical companies for liability by passing liability on to the physician who wrote the prescription for the drug. Now, that law is changing, with resulting liability for pharmaceutical advertisers.

Practical implications

The study recounts the primary criticisms of DTC advertising, and provides a number of steps that can be taken to help avoid legal liability for pharmaceutical companies that engage in DTC advertising.

Originality/value

The study looks at DTC advertising from both a marketing and a legal perspective, and combines those disciplines to draw conclusions helpful to DTC advertisers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

George B. Cunningham and Christina A. Rivera

The purpose of this paper is to (a) distinguish the structural designs, and (b) examine the relationship between structure and effectiveness in American sport organizations…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to (a) distinguish the structural designs, and (b) examine the relationship between structure and effectiveness in American sport organizations. Formalization, centralization, and specialization were examined to determine the structural designs. Senior level administrators from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I (N = 86) departments completed an electronic questionnaire. Cluster analysis was used to group departments according to the three dimensions of structure. Results demonstrated the presence of two structural designs—the Simple Structure and the Enabling Structure. MANCOVA procedures showed differences between departments in athletic achievement, but not in the education of student athletes. Discussion of the findings and future directions are presented.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and…

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Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Clare Kelliher and Emma Parry

This paper seeks to examine the practice of human resource management (HRM) in the UK voluntary sector. In recent years many voluntary sector organisations have experienced a…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the practice of human resource management (HRM) in the UK voluntary sector. In recent years many voluntary sector organisations have experienced a changing context, where they have become increasingly involved in contracting for the provision of publicly funded services. This paper examines the suggestion made by a number of commentators that as a result the government has exercised influence over the way in which human resources are managed in this sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses data from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey 2004 (WERS 2004) to examine HRM practice in the voluntary sector and compares this with the public and private sectors.

Findings

The findings show that most voluntary sector organisations have adopted performance‐oriented HR practices, communication and involvement schemes, and welfare‐oriented practices. This suggests a departure from the relatively unsophisticated HRM that has traditionally been found in the voluntary sector and which may be as a result of the influence of government on HRM standards in the sector.

Research limitations/implications

Future research, which adopts a longitudinal approach, would allow the impact of government influence on HRM practices in the voluntary sector to be examined in more depth.

Originality/value

This paper represents a rare examination of HRM practice across a wide range of voluntary sector organisations and provides insight into the potential influence of government on HRM in the sector.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Philip James

This paper aims to provide a reflection on the other contributions to this special issue of IJPSM on the “employment implications of the outsourcing of public services to…

1200

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a reflection on the other contributions to this special issue of IJPSM on the “employment implications of the outsourcing of public services to voluntary, not‐for‐profit organisations” in the light of more widely available discourses and evidence.

Design/methodological approach

The paper, in line with the purpose, draws on relevant secondary sources, including those forming part of this special issue.

Findings

The provided analysis centrally concludes that, against the backcloth of growing competitive pressures and public expenditure cuts, there is a real threat of a general downward trend in the employment conditions of voluntary sector staff engaged in the delivery of outsourced public services that has the potential to adversely affect service quality.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for much more extensive research on how market‐based outsourcing is impacting on the work experiences of voluntary sector staff outside the area of social care and the implications that it has for the quality of service provision.

Practical implications

The analysis draws attention to the need to consider further regulatory action to protect the terms and conditions of voluntary sector staff engaged in the delivery of outsourced public services.

Originality/value

The paper serves to highlight that, rather than improving the value for money of social care services, outsourcing has the potential to do the opposite by adversely impacting on the employment conditions of staff and hence the quality of services provided.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

The most significant event for the School has been the announcement of the creation of the National Centre for Management Research and Development. The Centre is due to open in…

Abstract

The most significant event for the School has been the announcement of the creation of the National Centre for Management Research and Development. The Centre is due to open in 1986 and will provide research facilities for up to 20 major projects designed to improve the competitiveness of Canadian business practices.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Serdar Ögel and İlkin Yaran Ögel

Introduction: As internet and communication technologies are getting developed, the commercial transaction is becoming more electronic. This change also brings new approaches to…

Abstract

Introduction: As internet and communication technologies are getting developed, the commercial transaction is becoming more electronic. This change also brings new approaches to new payment mechanisms like emergence of crypto currencies. They are virtual and digital currencies which can only be used in electronic environment but they are increasingly treated as a new payment and investment tool. Nevertheless, their use has not spread into the general public, yet. At this point, it will better to take the complex nature of the crypto currencies into consideration because it may still lead to some risks for people and the type of the risks perceived by consumers may influence their attitudes toward and intention to use crypto currencies.

Aim: Accordingly, this study attempts to examine the interaction between perceived risk, attitudes toward and intention to use crypto currencies within the context of Bitcoin, as the first crypto currency.

Method: This study was designed as a causal research. The sample of the study was reached by using convenience sampling method and data were collected with survey. The compiled data were tested with Structural Equation Model.

Findings: A statistically significant and negative relationship was found between perceived financial, time and psychological risk and attitudes toward the use of Bitcoin, and a statistically significant and positive relationship was found between attitudes toward and intention to use Bitcoin. The findings of the study are expected to contribute to both relevant literature and practice by explaining the financial behavior of the individuals within the context of perceived risk theory.

Details

New Challenges for Future Sustainability and Wellbeing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-969-6

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Daniel Briggs, Luke Telford, Anthony Lloyd and Anthony Ellis

This paper aims to explore 15 UK adult social care workers’ experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore 15 UK adult social care workers’ experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper’s 15 open-ended interviews with adult social care workers are complemented by digital ethnography in COVID-19 social media forums. This data set is taken from a global mixed-methods study, involving over 2,000 participants from 59 different countries.

Findings

Workers reported a lack of planning, guidance and basic provisions including personal protective equipment. Work intensification brought stress, workload pressure and mental health problems. Family difficulties and challenges of living through the pandemic, often related to government restrictions, intensified these working conditions with precarious living arrangements. The workers also relayed a myriad of challenges for their residents in which, the circumstances appear to have exacerbated dementia and general health problems including dehydration, delirium and loneliness. Whilst COVID-19 was seen as partially responsible for resident deaths, the sudden disruptions to daily life and prohibitions on family visits were identified as additional contributing factors in rapid and sudden decline.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the paper’s sample cohort is small, given the significance of COVID-19 at this present time the findings shed important light on the care home experience as well as act as a baseline for future study.

Social implications

Care homes bore the brunt of illness and death during the first and second COVID-19 waves in the UK, and many of the problems identified here have still yet to be actioned by the government. As people approach the summer months, an urgent review is required of what happened in care homes and this paper could act as some part of that evidence gathering.

Originality/value

This paper offers revealing insights from frontline care home workers and thus provides an empirical snapshot during this unique phase in recent history. It also builds upon the preliminary/emerging qualitative research evidence on how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted care homes, care workers and the residents.

1 – 10 of 51