Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Marie Anne Hutton

The title of this chapter was inspired by Martin, a prisoner the author met while conducting fieldwork. Martin remarked that, despite the common rhetoric around prisoners…

Abstract

The title of this chapter was inspired by Martin, a prisoner the author met while conducting fieldwork. Martin remarked that, despite the common rhetoric around prisoners ‘maintaining’ their family ties, the reality was that during imprisonment it became more about trying to cling on to them. Imprisonment is perhaps one of the most brutal disruptions a family can undergo, leaving them little choice but to adapt to this enforced transition. Immediately, the spaces where family life can happen narrow severely and become dictated by the prison environment and the plethora of rules that regulate it. The immediate physical separation, onerous restrictions on physical contact and the heavily surveilled nature of family contact during imprisonment constricts space for emotional expression, often rendering romantic relationships clandestine and fatherhood attenuated. Further, the temporal space for family is reduced as limited opportunities for visits lead prisoners to eschew contact with wider family members and prioritise their ‘nuclear’ family. Drawing on empirical research conducted at two male prisons in England and Wales, this chapter then, will detail the complexities of how families navigate this transition and the limitations on what family can mean in the prison environment. The chapter will conclude with the implications of these restrictions for the ultimate transition when prisoners return ‘home’.

Details

Families in Motion: Ebbing and Flowing through Space and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-416-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Mogens Dahl

The paper identifies lessons to be learned from the planning of Euronet‐DIANE and SCANNET with a view to the general prerequisites and problems to be handled when several…

Abstract

The paper identifies lessons to be learned from the planning of Euronet‐DIANE and SCANNET with a view to the general prerequisites and problems to be handled when several interested parties are brought together for the purpose of setting up information services from databases and networks. Online services are placed as one among several communication channels for scientific information. The planning of Euronet‐DIANE and SCANNET in this environment followed different patterns. The basic elements were the same, but the order in which the problems received attention differed.

Details

Program, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

Michael Casey

Up to 25 hosts will eventually make approximately 150 databases available on Euronet‐DIANE. If European users are to benefit from, rather than be totally confused by this…

Abstract

Up to 25 hosts will eventually make approximately 150 databases available on Euronet‐DIANE. If European users are to benefit from, rather than be totally confused by this massive store of information they must be educated, trained and supported in their efforts to exploit it. The common command set is already with us, as are multilingual thesauri and many other user aids for bibliographic retrieval systems. User manuals, however, present a confused picture to the user because they exhibit such a wide variation in content, structure and design. This paper summarises the recommendations of a study on the harmonisation of user manuals carried out under contract to the Commission of the European Communities as part of the Euronet‐DIANE project.

Details

Online Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Michael Lazo and James Kirk

The need to improve performance and productivity causes conflict when a blind typist comes under scrutiny. Although not intentionally singled out, she felt threatened…

Abstract

The need to improve performance and productivity causes conflict when a blind typist comes under scrutiny. Although not intentionally singled out, she felt threatened. This is a sensitive issue that needs to be handled with tact and professionalism. Because of the personalities involved, there is no easy solution to this case, a characteristic that makes “performance shock” a valuable learning tool.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-617-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Philip John Archard

This paper is concerned with what intensive family intervention professionals reveal to the parents with whom they work about whether they themselves are parents or not…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is concerned with what intensive family intervention professionals reveal to the parents with whom they work about whether they themselves are parents or not, as a form of professional self-disclosure in child welfare work. This paper also addresses the act of lying in professional self-disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on material from a series of narrative interviews completed with practitioners from one family intervention programme in an English local authority as part of a study looking at how children’s services professionals experience the suffering of parents. The study was based on a psychoanalytically informed methodological approach, which is represented in the analysis provided in the paper.

Findings

The overall team ethos regarding parental status disclosure is considered briefly first then two participants’ accounts are explored in depth. These involved, what can be considered as, questionable or unorthodox stances regarding parental status disclosure (and self-disclosure more generally). The exploration illustrates the role that practitioners’ personal lives and histories can play in influencing how the act of professional parental status disclosure is experienced and how particular positions are invested in regarding the role of self-disclosure in working relationships with parents.

Originality/value

Child welfare and family intervention professionals are often asked personal questions by the parents and carers they work with, including questions about whether they are a parent or not. These questions can be difficult to answer and there is a need for dedicated empirical analysis into the ways in which professionals experience, think about and respond to them and what they disclose about themselves when working with families.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Bob Gorman

With one foot in HR and training, and the other in communication, Diane Gayeski is well placed to understand the strategic role HR has to play in aligning corporate…

Abstract

With one foot in HR and training, and the other in communication, Diane Gayeski is well placed to understand the strategic role HR has to play in aligning corporate culture with the external brand. Here she explains to Bob Gorman why the best place for HR professionals to start is by taking the marketing vice‐president to lunch.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Arnie Hilgert

This study demonstrated that women EMBA graduates experience broadened perspectives. They “think more broadly”, “understand more comprehensively” and report the “life…

Abstract

This study demonstrated that women EMBA graduates experience broadened perspectives. They “think more broadly”, “understand more comprehensively” and report the “life changing” outcomes expected by their sponsoring organizations. The focus was on the development of women managers from specialist perspectives to a more integrated generalist perspective. Personal development, and career development literatures provided the theoretical basis for this study. Data were collected using invited essays, and semi‐structured interviews. Evidence of change appeared in the essays and the interviews. The essays indicated graduates experienced increased confidence, cognitive flexibility, and broadened perspectives. The interviews indicated: greater self‐determination, more flexible approaches to roles, greater value of self and time, more process‐oriented, increased understanding of self and others, the meaning of success was competence, and that competence was valued over political gamesmanship.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2017

Cheryl Joseph

Abstract

Details

You’re Hired!
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-489-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Kelly Lockwood

Imprisonment has the potential to significantly impact mothering (Lockwood, 2017). For some women, imprisonment may present the opportunity to repair and rebuild fractured…

Abstract

Imprisonment has the potential to significantly impact mothering (Lockwood, 2017). For some women, imprisonment may present the opportunity to repair and rebuild fractured relationships with their children; however, for many, being separated from their children is constructed as the most difficult aspect of imprisonment (Crewe, Hulley, & Wright, 2017), with the potential to severely alter, disrupt or even terminate mothering (Lockwood, 2017; 2018). Available research highlights the importance of mothering in relation to women's adjustment to and experiences of imprisonment and upon their rehabilitation, resettlement and potential reunification (Baldwin, 2017; Lockwood, 2017, Lockwood, 2018). However, consistent with prison policy and practice, available research tends to rely on narrow definitions that often construct motherhood in relation to younger children, under the age of 18 (Caddle & Crisp, 1997). Consequently, the stories, experiences and needs of mothers in prison with older adult children often remain unheard.

Focussing on the individual stories of mothers in prison and those who have recently been released from prison, within this chapter, I consider the way in which women story motherhood in relation to older adult children. Presenting three interrelated narratives, ‘Mothering from a distance: stories of missing out on children's transitions to adulthood’; ‘“Motherwork: stories of participating in mothering adult children’ and ‘“Role reversal: stories of receiving support from adult children’, I consider the specific challenges and opportunities for mothers in prison with older adult children.

1 – 10 of over 2000