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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Gazi Mahabubul Alam, Morsheda Parvin, Ahmad Fauzi Bin Mohd Ayub, Romana Kader and Md. Mahfuzur Rahman

An old saying –“Jack of all trades, master of none”– deliberately asserts that the purpose of a master’s degree program is to generate high level job skills in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

An old saying –“Jack of all trades, master of none”– deliberately asserts that the purpose of a master’s degree program is to generate high level job skills in order to improve a nation's economy, while a bachelor degree produces economically productive graduates. Employment of such graduates is fundamentally important for personal and economic development. There is a link between a bachelor’s and master's degree and how these qualifications are linked to the job market. Both horizontal and vertical mismatches are developed which is the central focus of this research.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the differentiated nature of research questions, multiple techniques are used to collect the data. However, this research bears the norms of the qualitative method. Both secondary and primary data are used, and meanwhile secondary data are collected by the banks, Bangladesh Bureau of Educational Information and Statistics (BANBEIS), University Grants Commission (UGC) and by the institutions sampled. Primary data are gathered from interviews with key people. Data were collected from three institutions of higher education and from six commercial banks and from the Central Bank. The academic results of 21,325 MBA graduates and education backgrounds of 750 executives working in banks served as the basis for establishing our arguments.

Findings

This study discovers that MBA graduates who have studied science subjects achieved much better grades in the MBA compared to their counterparts who studied business from secondary provision to first degree. The market-driven MBA programme has become a “business product”. The major revenue of higher education institutions comes from enrolment in MBA courses. For this reason, a science-friendly MBA program is developed to generate more business. If this continues, the philosophy of the master's program would either be lost or will have to be redefined in the 21st century.

Originality/value

While a few studies have investigated the area of HE in Bangladesh, none covers the impact of MBA degrees on the job market and its contribution to enhancing job skills.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Provides the abstracts of 41 articles published in a number of 1996 journals, with a focus on management training. Enables readers to select areas of interest such as…

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834

Abstract

Provides the abstracts of 41 articles published in a number of 1996 journals, with a focus on management training. Enables readers to select areas of interest such as MBAs, management education methods, university‐industry co‐operation, competence assessment, business schools, continuous learning and international education

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Case study
Publication date: 5 May 2016

Monika Hudson and Keith O. Hunter

When do you throw it all away? The first senior female in a male-dominated business school decides it all comes down to a question of principle – and maybe a few others…

Abstract

Synopsis

When do you throw it all away? The first senior female in a male-dominated business school decides it all comes down to a question of principle – and maybe a few others. What is the best balance between her responsibilities to students, family, and the next generation of female leaders? Can she both be true to herself and compromise? What factors should influence this decision? This case brings together questions about power and influence, rational decision-making, leadership, and the intra and inter-personal responsibilities of organizational “firsts.” Further, issues related to a university's effort to better compete within the global higher education marketplace, provide a valuable opportunity to explore institutional approaches to promoting diversity, inclusion, and cultural competency.

Research methodology

This case, which was developed from primary sources, highlights the array of competing objectives and personal and political tensions involved in university administration.

Relevant courses and levels

This case was designed for graduate students in Masters of Public Administration, Masters of Business Administration, Masters of Education in Organizational Leadership, or similar graduate degrees that include significant management and leadership content. Students working with this case should have already completed foundational courses in topics such as organizational management, public policy, leadership, strategic human resources management, or their equivalents within their respective programs of study. Virtually all of the issues raised by this case address core themes, concepts, theses, and theories associated with an accredited graduate program in educational management, business or public administration.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Harry Gray

The paper aims to make a broad assessment of the proliferation of Master of business administration (MBA) degrees and to consider comparative value.

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691

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to make a broad assessment of the proliferation of Master of business administration (MBA) degrees and to consider comparative value.

Design/methodology/approach

There is brief description and analysis of what MBAs are and are intended for, with best and worst kinds of provision discussed

Findings

The conclusion is that the whole concept of MBA needs to be rethought bearing in mind the wide variety of careers and ages of students.

Originality/value

The conclusion is that there should be more specialist masters degrees for mature professionals and better consideration should be given to real career needs of younger students.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Eddie Blass and Pauline Weight

Building on part 1 of this series, this paper aims to look at alternative ways in which business schools can develop the future managers and leaders needed by

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1958

Abstract

Purpose

Building on part 1 of this series, this paper aims to look at alternative ways in which business schools can develop the future managers and leaders needed by organisations. It draws attention to an emerging gap in the marketplace and suggests one possible model for addressing it.

Design/methodology/approach

A year‐long future study was undertaken at Cranfield School of Management combining a range of traditional research methods and samples including literature review, surveys of alumni, academics and futurists, interviews with recruiters and human resource (HR) managers, a Delphi study with international participants, and interviews and a focus group with business leaders. The results were then analysed and combined to form the pictures developed in this article and its counterpart.

Findings

Following on from Part 1, this paper proposes a new “élite” qualification for senior managers and leaders to replace the Master of Business Administration (MBA) in the marketplace. This would allow the MBA to become the graduate conversion course in business necessary as an entry point into management. The Master's in Business Leadership (MBL) focuses on the individual rather than curriculum, and is a personal development journey rather than a functional knowledge‐based experience, as there is an assumption that this knowledge base is already there prior to the course being undertaken. This paper concludes with a comparative analysis of the MBA, the MBL and the International Master's in Practising Management which Mintzberg has proferred as his alternative to the MBA.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comparison of MBA offerings and potential substitutes. It also suggests a new curriculum for senior management education to prepare people for leadership in the future, while repositioning the MBA as a mass graduate conversion programme. By putting forward one possible way forward in the management education market, this paper hopes to open discussion for further development of the international management education sector.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Lynette Louw, Johan K. Bosch and Danie J.L. Venter

The primary purpose of this article is to report on the opinions and perceptions of graduates of the quality and standing of South African Masters of Business

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2337

Abstract

The primary purpose of this article is to report on the opinions and perceptions of graduates of the quality and standing of South African Masters of Business Administration (MBA) programmes. This article seeks to assess specific outcomes of the MBA programmes offered by South African business schools; to gauge the quality of the MBA programmes of South African business schools, based on graduates’ perceptions; to extract factors relating to the MBA programme outcomes; and MBA programme quality; and to elicit the opinions of graduates on the future development of the MBA programme in South Africa. The main findings pertain to the MBA graduates’ perceptions of the outcome and quality of the MBA programme as well as the most prominent findings in respect of the open question on the future development of South African MBA programmes, from the perspective of graduates.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

L.I. Okazaki‐Ward

Postgraduate business education in the higher educational institutions in Japan was poorly developed, and lagged far behind not only the other advanced economies, but in…

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1286

Abstract

Postgraduate business education in the higher educational institutions in Japan was poorly developed, and lagged far behind not only the other advanced economies, but in some of the developing countries until the end of the 1980s. However, during the 1990s it has undergone considerable changes as part of the reform in postgraduate education in Japan. This article attempts to explain why MBA education did not develop in Japan in the first place, and then how these changes came about. It also looks at the changes in social and economic backgrounds that promoted and speeded these changes. Finally it attempts to view the future of postgraduate professional education in Japan.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Frank Shipper

Multiple initiatives have been taken to address the lack of managerial skills of MBA graduates since the Porter and McKibbin report. How effective or widespread these…

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2035

Abstract

Multiple initiatives have been taken to address the lack of managerial skills of MBA graduates since the Porter and McKibbin report. How effective or widespread these initiatives have been has been questioned. Before proceeding, 11 managerial skills were identified and tested for their relevance to performance. Support was found that nine of the 11 skills were associated with managerial performance. Why these two skills were not associated with performance was explored. To test for the effectiveness of the initiatives to teach managerial skills in MBA programs, multiple comparisons of the managerial skills of recent and past MBA graduates and other graduates were made. In general, the comparisons failed to find that MBAs have a significant advantage in managerial skills. Reasons for these findings are explored in the paper. In addition, the challenge this represents to MBA programs is also discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Andrew Lock

Business school accreditation has been long established in North America. Its development in the UK and Europe is of much more recent origin and has been fuelled primarily…

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1451

Abstract

Business school accreditation has been long established in North America. Its development in the UK and Europe is of much more recent origin and has been fuelled primarily by concerns to protect the MBA brand. It is only recently that a European process of whole school accreditation (EQUIS) has emerged, and the process is now continuing with the “second wave” of schools. This paper traces the development of accreditation processes in the USA, the UK, across the European Union and Central and Eastern Europe. It also explores the implications of accreditation and recognition systems for providers and consumers of business qualifications, whether employers or prospective students. The relationship between these systems and national and institutional approaches to academic quality standards is explored. Finally, we analyse the future of the range of accrediting systems in the UK and the wider European Union.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2013

Isaac O. Amoako is a researcher at the Centre for Enterprise and Economic Development Research (CEEDR) and lecturer in enterprise and small business at the Department of

Abstract

Isaac O. Amoako is a researcher at the Centre for Enterprise and Economic Development Research (CEEDR) and lecturer in enterprise and small business at the Department of International Management and Innovation, all at Middlesex University Business School, UK. He completed his Ph.D. in 2012 in the same university and his paper on “alternative institutions” used by exporting SMEs in Ghana has been accepted and forthcoming in International Small Business Journal (ISBJ). His research interests include enterprise and small business start-up and management, interorganizational trust, culture and organizations, and international business management. Prior to his academic career he was an entrepreneur starting and managing his own businesses for over 20 years.

Details

(Dis)Honesty in Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-602-6

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