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1 – 10 of 393
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Mostaque Zebal, Ahmed Ferdous and Colin Chambers

The purpose of this paper is to develop and propose an integrated model of marketing knowledge from a tacit knowledge management perspective. This paper further aims at developing…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and propose an integrated model of marketing knowledge from a tacit knowledge management perspective. This paper further aims at developing a linkage between explicit knowledge perspective (internal and external marketing) and tacit knowledge orientation of an organization, leading to improved business success.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a conceptual model showing the integration of the internal, tacit and explicit knowledge perspectives that results in improved business success. The proposed model and associated propositions are drawn from the synthesis of relevant knowledge and marketing literature.

Findings

Five major associated propositions are offered in the paper, which inform both scholars and practitioners about what constitutes a holistic market orientation and how organizations can achieve business success by adopting both an internal and external orientation to tacit and explicit knowledge management.

Originality/value

The model makes an original contribution to theoretical and organizational marketing management knowledge. It does this by extending the conceptual and operational boundaries of existing models of internal and external marketing, aimed at helping organizations achieve competitive advantage and business success.

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2014

Dick Martin

This paper aims to re-examine Marshall McLuhan ' s most famous aphorism – “the medium is the message” – within the context of recent sociological findings and concludes…

1668

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to re-examine Marshall McLuhan ' s most famous aphorism – “the medium is the message” – within the context of recent sociological findings and concludes that business strategists should take heed of McLuhan’s warnings, both in their personal and professional lives. Marshall McLuhan was a sociologist of the 1970s whose observations about the impact of modern technology were quoted more widely than they were actually understood.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reviews recent findings on the sociological and psychological impact of digital technologies and examines them within the context of McLuhan’s theories. The article includes a basic explanation of McLuhan’s classic aphorism – “The medium is the message.”

Findings

Digital technologies promised to make the world smaller, but, in many ways, they have made us smaller. The fragmentation of audiences, more powerful tools for filtering information and the heightened availability of personal media have all led to increased polarization and a decline in empathic perspective sharing.

Practical implications

This article invites practicing strategists to consider the implications of these developments in their personal and professional lives and offers practical advice for doing so.

Originality/value

The article presents an original perspective on McLuhan’s thesis, drawing from a broad range of recent studies.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 December 2022

Colin O'Reilly

Cross-country studies have shown that higher costs to starting a business tend to reduce entrepreneurship (Chambers and Munemo, 2019) and that an unfavorable environment for…

Abstract

Purpose

Cross-country studies have shown that higher costs to starting a business tend to reduce entrepreneurship (Chambers and Munemo, 2019) and that an unfavorable environment for business can increase poverty and income inequality (Chambers et al., 2019a; Djankov et al., 2018). Building on the current literature, the authors test whether barriers to starting a business at the state and city level in the USA are associated with changes in entrepreneurship and income inequality.

Design/methodology/approach

Measures of entrepreneurship (establishment entry rate and exit rate) are regressed on measures of barriers to entry in a cross-section of 50 states as well as a cross-section of 73 cities in the USA. Further, the authors regress measures of income inequality on measures of barriers to entry using the same two cross-sections. State level data on barriers to entry are from Teague (2016), published in the Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy. City level data on barriers to starting a business are from the Doing Business in North America (DBNA) dataset.

Findings

Results show that there is a negative and significant association between barriers to starting a business and the rate of firm exit. A standard deviation increase in barriers to entry is associated with a five percent decrease in the firm exit rate at the state level. The authors find only limited evidence that barriers to entry are associated with income inequality.

Originality/value

Despite a large volume of scholarship on how regulation and barriers to entry influence entrepreneurship, no study (to the authors’ knowledge) has investigated how general entry regulation affects the entry or exit rate of establishments at the state or municipal level in the USA.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2023

Peter H. Reid, Elliot Pirie and Rachael Ironside

This research explored the storytelling (collection, curation and use) in the Cabrach, a remote Scottish glen. This study aims to capture the methodological process of…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explored the storytelling (collection, curation and use) in the Cabrach, a remote Scottish glen. This study aims to capture the methodological process of storytelling and curation of heritage knowledge through the lens of the Cabrach's whisky distilling history, a central part of the area's cultural heritage, tangible and intangible. This research was conceptualised as “telling the story of telling the story of the Cabrach”. It was concerned with how the history, heritage, historiography and testimony associated with the parish could be harvested, made sense of and subsequently used.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was epistemological in nature and the research was concerned with how heritage knowledge is gathered, curated and understood. It was built around the collection of knowledge through expert testimony from Colin Mackenzie and Alan Winchester, who have extensively researched aspects of life in the Cabrach. This was done using a series of theme-based but free-flowing conversational workshop involving participants and research team. Issues of trust and authority in the research team were crucial. Data were recorded, transcribed and coded. A conceptual model for heritage storytelling in the Cabrach was developed together with a transferable version for other contexts.

Findings

The research was conceived around identifying the stories of the Cabrach and grouping them into cohesive narrative themes focused on the most important aspect of the glen's history (the development of malt whisky distilling). The research showed how all crucial narratives associated with the Cabrach were interconnected with that malt whisky story. It was concerned with identifying broad thematic narratives rather than the specific detailed stories themselves, but also from a methodological perspective how stories around those themes could be collected, curated and used. It presents the outcome of “expert testimony” oral history conversations and presents a conceptual model for the curation of heritage knowledge.

Practical implications

This paper reports on research which focuses on the confluence of those issues of heritage-led regeneration, intangible cultural heritage, as well as how stories of and from, about and for, a distinctive community in North-East Scotland can be collected, curated and displayed. It presents methodological conceptualisations as well as focused areas of results which can be used to create a strong and inclusive narrative to encapsulate the durable sense of place and support the revival of an economically viable and sustainable community.

Social implications

This conceptual model offers a framework with universal elements (Place, People, Perception) alongside a strong core narrative of storytelling. That core element may vary but the outer elements remain the same, with people and place being omnipresent and the need to build an emotional or visceral connection with visitors being crucial, beyond “telling stories” which might be regarded as parochial or narrowly focused. The model informs how communities and heritage organisations tell their stories in an authentic and proportionate manner. This can help shape and explain cultures and identities and support visitors' understanding of, and connection with, places they visit and experience.

Originality/value

The originality lies in two principal areas, the exploration of the narratives of a singularly distinctive community – the Cabrach – which plays a disproportionately significant role in the development of malt whisky distilling in Scotland; and also in terms of the methodological approach to the collection and curation of heritage storytelling, drawing not on first-hand accounts as in conventional oral history approaches but through the expert testimony of two historical and ethnographic researchers. The value is demonstrating the creation of a conceptual model which can be transferred to other contexts.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 80 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Garry D. Carnegie and Brendan T. O'Connell

The purpose of this Australian case study, set in the 1960s, is to comprehensively examine the responses of the two major professional accounting bodies to a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this Australian case study, set in the 1960s, is to comprehensively examine the responses of the two major professional accounting bodies to a financial/corporate/regulatory crisis necessitating the defence of the profession's legitimacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This historical paper draws on surviving primary records and secondary sources and applies the perspectives on the dynamics of occupational groups and the legitimacy typology of Suchman.

Findings

While the history of the accounting profession has been characterized by intra‐professional rivalries, this case study illustrates how such rivalries were put aside on recognising the power of collectivizing in defending the profession's legitimacy. Based on the available evidence, pragmatic legitimacy is shown to have been a key focus of attention by the major accounting bodies involved.

Research limitations/implications

The paper may motivate similar studies in Australia and elsewhere, thus potentially contributing to developing a literature on comparative international accounting history. The evidence for this historical investigation is largely restricted to surviving documents, making it necessary to rely on assessments of the key sources.

Originality/value

In addressing responses to crises in defending the legitimacy of the profession as a whole, the paper makes an original contribution in exploring the relationship between literature on the dynamics of occupational groups and on legitimacy management.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2022

Jane Parker, James Arrowsmith, Amanda Young-Hauser, Darrin Hodgetts, Stuart Colin Carr, Jarrod Haar and Siatu Alefaio-Tugia

The study maps workplace stakeholders’ perceptions of living wage (LW) impacts in New Zealand. Empirical findings inform an inaugural model of LW impacts and contingent factors at…

Abstract

Purpose

The study maps workplace stakeholders’ perceptions of living wage (LW) impacts in New Zealand. Empirical findings inform an inaugural model of LW impacts and contingent factors at individual, organisation, sector/industry and national levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a national employee survey, semi-structured interviews with business sector representatives, and staff in two LW organisation cases were subjected to thematic content analysis.

Findings

Informants emphasised anticipated LW impacts amid complex workplace and regulatory dynamics. Employers/managers stressed its cost effects. However, employees, human resource (HR) advocates and other LW proponents highlighted employee “investment” impacts that improve worker productivity and societal circumstances.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the need for further context-sensitive LW analysis. An initial model of LW impacts provides a framework for comparative and longitudinal work in other national contexts.

Practical implications

The proposed model categorises perceived LW effects and can inform policy development. Findings also stress a need for cross-agency initiatives to address LW concerns, including a key role for HR.

Social implications

The findings highlight perceptions of a LW impacting within and beyond the workplace. Whilst higher-quality management is seen to encourage better-informed decisions about “going living wage”, a LW's positive socio-economic impacts require multi-lateral initiatives, suggesting that those initiatives are is part of wider obligations for policy makers to encourage decent living standards.

Originality/value

This study provides a much-needed and inaugural focus on the intertwined workplace and wider impacts of a LW, extending extant econometric analyses. The paper also synthesizes different data sources to develop an inaugural, context-sensitive model of perceived LW effects.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Kyle John Lorenzano, Miles Sari, Colin Harrell Storm, Samuel Rhodes and Porismita Borah

Political polarization and incivility manifested itself online throughout the 2016 US presidential election. The purpose of this paper is to understand how features of social…

Abstract

Purpose

Political polarization and incivility manifested itself online throughout the 2016 US presidential election. The purpose of this paper is to understand how features of social media platforms (e.g. reacting, sharing) impacted the online public sphere during the 2016 election.

Design/methodology/approach

After conducting in-depth interviews with politically interested young people and applying deductive coding procedures to transcripts of the interviews, Dahlberg’s (2004) six normative conditions for the public sphere were used to empirically examine this interview data.

Findings

While some participants described strategies for productive political discussion on Social Networking Sites (SNS) and a willingness to use them to discuss politics, many users’ experiences largely fall short of Dahlberg’s (2004) normative criteria for the public sphere.

Research limitations/implications

The period in which these interviews were conducted in could have contributed to a more pessimistic view of political discussion in general.

Practical implications

Scholars and the public should recognize that the affordances of SNS for political discussion are not distributed evenly between different platforms, both for the sake of empirical studies of SNS moving forward and the state of democratic deliberation.

Originality/value

Although previous research has examined online and SNS-based political discussion as it relates to the public sphere, few attempts have been made understand how specific communicative practices or platform-specific features of SNS have contributed to or detracted from a healthy public sphere.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Colin M. Clarke‐Hill and Terry Robinson

Reports the results of fieldwork conducted in September 1994 on a sample of UK companies which had acquired businesses from the German privatization agency, the Treuhand, and a…

667

Abstract

Reports the results of fieldwork conducted in September 1994 on a sample of UK companies which had acquired businesses from the German privatization agency, the Treuhand, and a number of local agencies that had direct roles to play in the economic redevelopment of the new Eastern Länder. Develops and relates the experiences of these companies and explores the strategic motivations for their entry to the East German market. Questions the need for UK firms to gain experience in East Germany before venturing further into the developing economies of central and eastern Europe.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 96 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

39

Abstract

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Phil Chambers

To introduce the framework of accelerated learning and some of the pioneers who have helped to shape it. It also aims to give the reader tips on improving the speed and

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Abstract

Purpose

To introduce the framework of accelerated learning and some of the pioneers who have helped to shape it. It also aims to give the reader tips on improving the speed and effectiveness of their learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A description of the MESSAGE model and review of research behind it. Practical approach to applying accelerated learning in personal learning and training situations.

Findings

Insight into the multiple facets of a very wide subject area.

Practical implications

Improvement of learning effectiveness or at least curiosity to find out more.

Originality/value

An overview of accelerated learning. Useful for anyone studying or developing training.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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