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1 – 10 of 186
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Cindy Lee, Hyejin Bang, Doyeon Won and Lei Chen

This study investigated the influence of residents' perceived benefits and costs of hosting an international sporting event (i.e. 2019 Military World Games) on their attitudes and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated the influence of residents' perceived benefits and costs of hosting an international sporting event (i.e. 2019 Military World Games) on their attitudes and support toward the event.

Design/methodology/approach

Using social exchange theory, this study developed a model taking into consideration both benefits and costs in respondents' evaluations of hosting an event, which further influenced their attitude and support. A structural equation model was used to test the developed model with 461 responses from the 2019 Military World Games.

Findings

The results showed that the model has an acceptable fit to the data and supported all three hypotheses: Hypothesis 1 (Individuals' perceived benefits of hosting an event will positively influence their attitude toward the event), Hypothesis 2 (Individuals' perceived costs of hosting an event will negatively influence their attitude toward the event) and Hypothesis 3 (Individuals' attitude toward an event will influence their support for the event).

Originality/value

The developed model intended to provide a more comprehensive picture of individuals' evaluation of hosting an international sporting event by including both benefits and costs of hosting the event. As the support of residents becomes more important in successfully hosting an event, this model helps to understand what factors influence residents' support.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2017

Miriam Stewart, Denise L. Spitzer, Kaysi E. Kushner, Edward Shizha, Nicole Letourneau, Edward Makwarimba, Cindy-Lee Dennis, Michael Kariwo, Knox Makumbe and Jocelyn Edey

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test an accessible and culturally appropriate social support intervention designed to meet the support needs and preferences identified…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test an accessible and culturally appropriate social support intervention designed to meet the support needs and preferences identified by African refugee parents of young children.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was built on the research team’s preceding study assessing social support needs and intervention preferences of Sudanese and Zimbabwean refugee parents of young children. Face-to-face support groups led by peer and professional mentors were conducted bi-weekly over seven months. Qualitative data collection methods were employed through group and individual interviews.

Findings

In total, 85 refugee parents (48 Sudanese, 37 Zimbabwean; 47 male, 38 female) in two Canadian provinces participated in the social support intervention. Results demonstrated that this intervention increased participants’ social support by: providing information, enhancing spousal relationships, and expanding engagement with their ethnic community. This pilot intervention decreased refugee new parents’ loneliness and isolation, enhanced coping, improved their capacity to attain education and employment, and increased their parenting competence.

Practical implications

Peer mentors who were refugee parents of young children were key to facilitating the support intervention and to enhancing confidence of group members to raise their children in Canada. They acted as role models as they had faced similar challenges. Success of this intervention can also be attributed to its flexibility and participant-centered focus.

Originality/value

This is the first reported study to design and test the impacts of support interventions for African refugee parents of young children.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Catherine Mobley, Cindy Lee, John C. Morse, Jeffery Allen and Christine Murphy

The paper aims to report on the experiences moderating an interdisciplinary graduate-level sustainability seminar. Initiated in Fall 2002, the seminar has explored diverse…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to report on the experiences moderating an interdisciplinary graduate-level sustainability seminar. Initiated in Fall 2002, the seminar has explored diverse sustainability topics and reached approximately 150 faculty and students. The paper describes how the course shaped participants' perceptions of sustainability and influenced their viewpoints on interdisciplinarity. The paper discusses the implications of this seminar format for communicating about sustainability and provides suggestions for replicating the course at other institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Information about the course is complemented by analyses of the results of 15 in-depth interviews of students and faculty who have participated in the course.

Findings

The course facilitated positive outcomes for students and faculty by expanding their familiarity with interdisciplinary perspectives on sustainability and environmental issues, increasing respect for other disciplinary perspectives, learning the basic vocabulary of disciplines outside their area of expertise, and strengthening collaborations between faculty. The course can be strengthened with more involvement from colleagues from the humanities and social sciences, and with attention to equal participation from all involved.

Originality/value

The experience is unique in that it represents a nearly decade-long initiative to teaching about sustainability and biocomplexity from an interdisciplinary perspective. The innovative format, content, and pedagogical approach used for this course can be easily implemented in other disciplines. The learning community has facilitated other teaching and research endeavors. This model of sustainability education can advance understanding of complex environmental issues at a time when both interdisciplinarity and sustainability are becoming more common in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Richard Ho, Leo Huang, Stanley Huang, Tina Lee, Alexander Rosten and Christopher S. Tang

This paper sets out to present a practical approach to develop an effective customer loyalty program by incorporating competition and heterogeneity in customers' preferences, and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to present a practical approach to develop an effective customer loyalty program by incorporating competition and heterogeneity in customers' preferences, and by avoiding the pitfalls associated with different types of loyalty programs.

Design/methodology/approach

To illustrate the approach, the paper presents a case study of T&T Supermarkets in Canada to show how a retailer can develop a cost‐effective customer loyalty program to retain and reward loyal customers so as to increase shopping frequency and shopping expenditure. The approach consists of four major steps, which are explained in detail.

Findings

Most T&T shoppers split their shopping trips at T&T (for Asian groceries and other specialty items) and a major competitor (for Western items). This creates a unique opportunity for T&T to develop a loyalty program that is intended to entice its loyal shoppers to increase their shopping frequency and expenditure at T&T. A “hybrid” reward structure was recommended to address the fact that there are two major segments of customers who prefer different types of loyalty rewards.

Originality/value

In addition to avoiding some common pitfalls of various loyalty programs, this paper presents a practical approach to develop an effective customer loyalty program by incorporating competition and heterogeneity in customers' preferences.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

D. A. Hutchinson and C. L. Clarke

In this chapter, we inquire into our ever-unfolding experiences as teachers and with teacher research participants in order to explore the complexities of curriculum making in…

Abstract

In this chapter, we inquire into our ever-unfolding experiences as teachers and with teacher research participants in order to explore the complexities of curriculum making in teacher education. In doing so, we lay the foundation for understanding narrative inquiry as both theory and method as such, frame our work in this volume. Curriculum making, a term introduced by Joseph Schwab, reflects the dynamic process of learning in which the teacher, learner, subject matter, and milieu interact. Moreover, we think about the ways people make sense of themselves, identity-making, in the process of curriculum making. Through Derek’s experiences with Lee, a previous Grade five student, and Cindy’s work with Jesse, a research participant, we inquire into their curriculum making and identity-making. We argue that in schools, there are multiple curricula in the making, going beyond the formal notions of curriculum as grade-level standards or classroom objectives. In our inquiry process, we consider experiences in schools through Aoki’s understanding of curriculum-as-plan and lived curriculum. In his writing, Aoki noted that the lived experience of curriculum in schools is much more complex and varied than the planned curriculum that is meant for a generalized audience; students and teachers bring their lives with them into particular contexts that indelibly shape the ways that curriculum is lived out. As well, we think about the ways experiences and places shape teachers and researchers and the ways we see the world.

Details

Landscapes, Edges, and Identity-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-598-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Cindy G. Grappe, Cindy Lombart, Didier Louis and Fabien Durif

Animal welfare is increasingly favoured by consumers in their choice of food and cosmetic products, proposed by manufacturers and retailers. This study aims to investigate the…

5871

Abstract

Purpose

Animal welfare is increasingly favoured by consumers in their choice of food and cosmetic products, proposed by manufacturers and retailers. This study aims to investigate the impact of the “not tested on animals” claim on consumers' attitude and behavioural intention towards a cosmetic product through an enriched version of Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects design has been used. 450 participants were recruited through the social network of a cosmetics and personal hygiene brand in Quebec, Canada, and answered a questionnaire. They were randomly assigned to either a manipulation group (n = 226) or a control group (n = 224). Data were analysed with partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study shows that external (credibility and attitude towards marketing claims) and internal psychological variables (subjective norms and altruistic concerns with animal welfare) influence attitude towards and purchase intention of “not tested on animals” personal care products. More egotistic concerns, such as personal appearance, also explain the formation of attitude towards cruelty-free cosmetics.

Research limitations/implications

This research supplements Ajzen's original model with internal psychological (individuals' concerns with animal welfare and personal appearance) and external (general credibility of cosmetic products claims, credibility of the “not tested on animals” claim and attitude towards this claim) variables. These variables, as suggested by previous research on cosmetics and their claims, improve the understanding of consumer attitude and purchase behaviour patterns.

Practical implications

The study's findings point out the role of companies to increase consumers' knowledge on the significance and transparency of their messages, notably the “not tested on animals” claim. They also stress that policymakers in regions where regulation is unclear should at least punish untruthful communication pertaining to animal testing in cosmetic and personal care products.

Originality/value

Prior studies on cosmetic products did not investigate the difference of consumer attitude formation towards cruelty-free products compared to conventional cosmetic products. Consequently, this research shows that the construction of attitude towards cruelty-free products highly differs from conventional personal care.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2016

Laura J. Carfang

This chapter presents findings from the author’s qualitative descriptive phenomenological dissertation and explores the complex decision-making processes inherent to…

Abstract

This chapter presents findings from the author’s qualitative descriptive phenomenological dissertation and explores the complex decision-making processes inherent to internationalizing college and university campuses through the framework of bounded rationality. By capturing the essence of how college and university presidents describe their experiences of complex decision-making, a notable finding that emerged from the author’s study suggests that complex decision-making requires strategic decision-making approaches. Applying other decision-making strategies in complex situations empowers the decision-maker to mindfully maneuver through the intricate factors that impact choice and drive action. This chapter explores the complexity of how decisions are formulated from a strategic mindset, presents strategies and best practices, and offers recommendations that can be implemented as higher educational leaders embark on their own internationalization initiatives.

Details

University Partnerships for Academic Programs and Professional Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-299-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Jayne E. Costello and Vishal Arghode

This paper aims to explore member readiness for change in manufacturing industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore member readiness for change in manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed 14 upper management professionals in Northeast US state companies. Inductive analysis and creative synthesis were used for identifying important patterns, themes and relationships pertaining to external and internal factors influencing employee attitudes related to change processes.

Findings

The findings suggest relationship between process change and member readiness for change. Leadership and communication channels play a significant role in determining how members adapt and respond to organizational process changes. Companies can achieve desirable outcomes when members trust organizational leadership and perceive management as fair and transparent.

Originality/value

Currently, there is little known about the relationship between process change and member readiness for change in manufacturing industry. The study advances the theoretical literature and provides practical information for manufacturing professionals.

Case study
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Lee Zhuang

Business management, entrepreneurship, strategic management and business environment.

Abstract

Subject area

Business management, entrepreneurship, strategic management and business environment.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and Masters level business and management programmes.

Case overview

This case features a small labour intensive Chinese company, Bags of Luck (BoL), located in the south-eastern Fujian province. BoL makes ladies fashion handbags, unisex fashion backpacks and trendy lightweight cases for laptop and netbook computers for export to the US market. BoL have done very well over the years as a small private enterprise focusing on low-tech manufacturing and have managed to stay afloat through the most difficult period of the recent world recession. Currently troubled by fast changing market trends, rising material and employment costs, continuing appreciation of the Chinese currency, severe labour shortage, declining production volume and profitability, dated machinery, passive and reactive nature of business model, ineffective management structure and a complete lack of strategic vision, BoL is in deep crisis with its fate now hanging on the balance.

Expected learning outcomes

The case provides encourages students to: research into a range of current business management issues; analyse the impact of environmental changes on the survival and growth of a business organisation; develop their strategic thinking informed by real life and real-time research and assess the impact of exchange rate changes on the Chinese economy and the sustainability of Chinese model of economic growth.

Supplementary materials

Teaching note.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2022

Tiebing Shi, Robert Guang Tian, Cindy Zhiling Tu and Chi Lo Lim

This study aims to explore how two affective factors (i.e. brand attachment and consumer affinity) influence host country consumers' responses to an international brand alliance…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how two affective factors (i.e. brand attachment and consumer affinity) influence host country consumers' responses to an international brand alliance (IBA).

Design/methodology/approach

A two (brand attachment: high vs low) × two (consumer affinity: high vs low) factorial experiment was conducted with 336 US university students. The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method was used to test the conceptual model.

Findings

(1) Pre-attachment to the host brand and consumer affinity for the country-of-origin (COO) of the foreign partner brand positively influence attitudes toward the IBA. (2) Attitudes toward the IBA positively influence post-attachment to the host brand, intention to buy the IBA product and willingness to recommend the IBA product. (3) Pre-attachment to the host brand positively influences post-attachment to the host brand.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on factors influencing attitudes toward IBAs by finding the significant influences of pre-attachment to the host brand and consumer affinity for the COO of the foreign partner brand on host country consumers' responses to IBAs.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

1 – 10 of 186