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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2011

Cheryl J. Craig

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to trace the origins of narrative inquiry as an empirical research method specifically created to examine how teachers come to…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to trace the origins of narrative inquiry as an empirical research method specifically created to examine how teachers come to know in their own terms.

Approach – The chapter reviews key conceptualizations in the teaching and teacher education field chronologically.

Findings – The review begins with Clandinin and Connelly's groundbreaking work concerning teachers’ personal practical knowledge, the professional knowledge landscapes of schools, and stories to live by (teacher identity). Three other important narrative conceptualizations on the research line are then highlighted: narrative resonance, narrative authority, and knowledge communities. Special attention is also paid to how narrative inquiry has fueled studies having to do with curriculum, subject matter, and culture. Narrative inquiry's important contributions to the emergence of the self-study of teaching and teacher education practices genre of research is additionally highlighted, along with several more recent advances having to do with collaborative narrative inquiries, studies with children, and reforming school landscapes.

Research implications – Lingering issues relating to narrative inquiry's acceptance as a legitimate research approach are also discussed; latent opportunities are likewise paid attention.

Value – The value of the chapter is that it is the first work that has specifically followed developments on the Connelly–Clandinin research line. The chapter shows the major contributions that the world-class research program – and the associated research projects spawned from it – have made to teaching and teacher education internationally.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Sharon Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to promote narrative inquiry as a legitimate and rich research approach for academics undertaking postgraduate studies in higher education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to promote narrative inquiry as a legitimate and rich research approach for academics undertaking postgraduate studies in higher education learning and teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is framed within a personal narrative – one that draws upon the author's personal experience as an academic developer. It draws heavily on narrative theory to support its claims.

Findings

It is argued that when narrative inquiry is presented as a complement to, rather than a replacement for, other research approaches, uptake amongst diverse groups of academics is strong. Furthermore, it is suggested that when accompanied by personal engagement with narrative inquiry and presented within a theoretical framework that honours its history, its robust literature and highlights its fundamental purpose and unique qualities, the possibilities offered by narrative are more likely to be understood and embraced.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based upon the experience of one academic working within one university.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the possibilities offered by narrative inquiry as a research approach for diverse groups of teaching academics.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

C. L. Clarke

In this chapter, I explicate the engagement of poetic expression as research analysis to understand more deeply and to represent more rigorously the experience of research…

Abstract

In this chapter, I explicate the engagement of poetic expression as research analysis to understand more deeply and to represent more rigorously the experience of research participants within educational research. As a tool of analysis, poetry has the strength to disrupt expectations and invite multiple interpretations of research. Here, I articulate a methodology for engaging poetic expression fully as a tool of narrative research to reach beyond textual analysis and representation of participants’ conversations into a deeper expression of their stories to live by. Poetic expression of narrative research is the particular emphasized, which is to say that meaning-making facilitated by poetic expression relies on a consistent and minute focus on the particular. Through poetic expression of research, thoroughly member-checked by participants, I surface and make evident my position as a researcher within the research. This chapter identifies ways in which poetic expression of research invites voice on multiple levels. The poetic expression of research within a narrative inquiry makes visible the experience of the research as an unfolding experience itself for the participant, the researcher, and the reader. I demonstrate the ways in which infusing a narrative inquiry with the poetic expression of research provokes the researcher as well as the reader to draw deeply on personal experience to make sense of the research. Furthermore, poetic expression of research invites participation from readers to engage poetically with the research and become a subsequent co-participant/researcher as they make sense, themselves, of the poetic expressions of research.

Details

Landscapes, Edges, and Identity-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-598-1

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2012

Stefinee Pinnegar and Mary Lynn Hamilton

Purpose – In this chapter, we examine the influence of the commonplace of sociality within narrative inquiry during the process of interpretation and meaning-making. Our…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter, we examine the influence of the commonplace of sociality within narrative inquiry during the process of interpretation and meaning-making. Our project was multivisioned because we were interested in what we learned about the methodology of narrative inquiry within the context of a phenomenon for inquiry (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000), which for this study was our identity as teacher educators (Bullough, 2005).

Approach – Using narrative inquiry, we interrogate our interpretive processes privileging the commonplace of sociality in examining stories of our identity as teacher educators from our own experience as teacher educators.

Findings – In our inquiry into interpretation from the orientation of the narrative commonplace of the social, four points of understanding emerged: (1) interpretation within the methodology of narrative inquiry is living and interpretation exists in the midst; (2) all three dimensions of the narrative inquiry space are always part of the process regardless of the commonplace under consideration; (3) if we look inward/outward in the process of interpretation, it always leads us back to the relational; and (4) when we deepen the analytic process, ethical issues, and therefore renewed grappling with our identity, emerge.

Research implications – Narrative inquiry at every phase – design, data collection, analysis, and representation – is a form of living and analysis and interpretation. As well, representation must allow space for the holistic and organic quality that this form of inquiry demands in the development and communication of ideas.

Value – The study points to the ways in which research on humans’ action and interaction returns to the relational and ethical even when that is not the focus of the research. Further, our response to narrative inquiry is not always analysis but often turns to story instead.

Details

Narrative Inquirers in the Midst of Meaning-making: Interpretive Acts of Teacher Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-925-7

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

M. Shaun Murphy

In this chapter, the process of doctoral research is discussed in relation to narrative inquiry. I was the doctoral supervisor for Cindy and Derek while they completed…

Abstract

In this chapter, the process of doctoral research is discussed in relation to narrative inquiry. I was the doctoral supervisor for Cindy and Derek while they completed their PhDs. I examine in this chapter my experiences alongside Derek and Cindy. I consider the process of recruitment, field text collection and generation, the writing process, and considerations based on the methodology on narrative inquiry, with attention focused on the Deweyan ontology of experience, the three-dimensional narrative inquiry space, co-composition of research texts, narrative threads, living and telling narrative inquiries, and the relational quality of narrative inquiry. This chapter closes with thoughts about who we are in relationship with each other in the graduate process and the fluid nature of research.

Details

Landscapes, Edges, and Identity-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-598-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 April 2017

Trudy Cardinal and Sulya Fenichel

In this chapter, we explore our experiences of co-teaching an undergraduate elementary teacher education class titled, “Teaching Language Arts in FNMI (First Nations…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore our experiences of co-teaching an undergraduate elementary teacher education class titled, “Teaching Language Arts in FNMI (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) Contexts.” In our curriculum-making for the course, we drew on Narrative Inquiry as pedagogy, as well as on Indigenous storybooks, novels, and scholarship. We chose to work in these ways so that we might attempt to complicate and enrich both our experiences as teacher educators, and the possibilities of what it means to engage in Language Arts alongside Indigenous children, youth, and families in Kindergarten through Grade 12 classrooms. Thus, central to this chapter will be reflection on our efforts to co-create curriculum alongside of students – considered in their multiplicity also as pre-service teachers, mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, daughters, sons, etc. – in ways that honored all of our knowing and experience. The relational practices inherent to Narrative Inquiry and Indigenous approaches to education, such as the creation and sharing of personal annals/timelines and narratives, along with small and large group conversations and talking circles are pedagogies we hoped would invite safe, reflective, and communal spaces for conversation. While certainly not a tension-free process, all of the pedagogical choices we made as teacher educators provide us the opportunity to attend to the relational and ontological commitments of Narrative Inquiry, to the students in their processes of becoming, to Indigenous worldviews, and to the responsibilities of the Alberta Language Arts curriculum.

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2014

C. Aiden Downey, Lee Schaefer and D. Jean Clandinin

Abstract

Details

Narrative Conceptions of Knowledge: Towards Understanding Teacher Attrition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-138-1

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Brenda Green

Traditional academic discourse in qualitative studies is devoid of the subjective individual, and lacks the particulars of experience and the lifelikeness that evokes…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional academic discourse in qualitative studies is devoid of the subjective individual, and lacks the particulars of experience and the lifelikeness that evokes meaning when researchers address real‐life problems. This paper aims to explore the value and application of utilizing narrative inquiry in nursing research. As a result, this review seeks to argue that understanding the lived experience allows nurse researchers an “insider view” and a deeper understanding of health and social issues that arises from the relationship between the participant and researcher. Additionally this paper aims to highlight some of the challenges and tensions in narrative work including the researcher's self‐reflection within the research process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

This paper highlights some of the challenges and tensions in narrative work including the researcher's self‐reflection within the research process. It argues that understanding the lived experience allows nurse researchers an “insider view” and a deeper understanding of health and social issues that arises from the relationship between the participant and researcher.

Originality/value

This original article presents an argument that suggests narrative inquiry in nursing research offers a particular way of caring about how knowledge is produced and the importance of the relationship between the researcher and the co‐researcher.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

D. A. Hutchinson and C. L. Clarke

In this chapter, we inquire into our ever-unfolding experiences as teachers and with teacher research participants in order to explore the complexities of curriculum…

Abstract

In this chapter, we inquire into our ever-unfolding experiences as teachers and with teacher research participants in order to explore the complexities of curriculum making in teacher education. In doing so, we lay the foundation for understanding narrative inquiry as both theory and method as such, frame our work in this volume. Curriculum making, a term introduced by Joseph Schwab, reflects the dynamic process of learning in which the teacher, learner, subject matter, and milieu interact. Moreover, we think about the ways people make sense of themselves, identity-making, in the process of curriculum making. Through Derek’s experiences with Lee, a previous Grade five student, and Cindy’s work with Jesse, a research participant, we inquire into their curriculum making and identity-making. We argue that in schools, there are multiple curricula in the making, going beyond the formal notions of curriculum as grade-level standards or classroom objectives. In our inquiry process, we consider experiences in schools through Aoki’s understanding of curriculum-as-plan and lived curriculum. In his writing, Aoki noted that the lived experience of curriculum in schools is much more complex and varied than the planned curriculum that is meant for a generalized audience; students and teachers bring their lives with them into particular contexts that indelibly shape the ways that curriculum is lived out. As well, we think about the ways experiences and places shape teachers and researchers and the ways we see the world.

Details

Landscapes, Edges, and Identity-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-598-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

The purpose of this chapter is to make visible the similarities and differences among narrative, self-study of teacher education practices, and autoethnographic…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to make visible the similarities and differences among narrative, self-study of teacher education practices, and autoethnographic methodologies to generate clarity about when each methodology might be most appropriate. Using Margery Wolf’s (1992) A Thrice Told Tale as a heuristic to support our exploration, we look at a selected slice of data as if standing within each methodology. As we do that we consider ways that we might engage each methodology to push forward our thinking about powerful research. Our goal is to critically examine the processes that researchers use for the study and to explore the ways using particular methodologies in appropriate ways that can strengthen our thinking about professional knowledge.

Details

Knowing, Becoming, Doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

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