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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Clara R.B. Oguntona, Monsurat Apoyin and Anne‐Marie Olateju

The food and nutrient intake of 250 (135 male, 115 female) adolescent Nigerian high school students have been surveyed to determine the contributions of different food groups to…

659

Abstract

The food and nutrient intake of 250 (135 male, 115 female) adolescent Nigerian high school students have been surveyed to determine the contributions of different food groups to their intakes of protein, calcium and iron. Twenty‐four‐hour dietary recall technique was used to obtain details of food intake and questionnaires administered to obtain social and economic circumstances of subjects’ family. Male subjects had more energy, protein, calcium and iron intake but no significant (p < 0.05) differences when compared with females. Cereal based foods were the most important sources of dietary protein, supplying between 40‐52 per cent for all subjects and 60 per cent or more for 29 per cent of the subjects. Proportions of dietary protein from legumes, meats, vegetables and roots ranged from10‐21 per cent, 3‐13 per cent, 7‐17 per cent, 6.5‐12.9 per cent respectively. Cereals were also the most important source of dietary calcium (56.8 per cent) and iron (33.16 per cent) for most subjects. The contribution of meats and legumes however, approximate that of cereals for 36 per cent of subjects. Apart from gender, residence at home or in boarding house and the socio‐economic status of the subject’s family significantly affect the sources of dietary protein, calcium and iron.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Clara R.B. Oguntona, Justina A. Odunmbaku and Bolanle O. Ottun

The objectives of the study are the standardization of ten Nigerian dishes and the determination of their proximate composition. Recipes for the ten dishes were obtained through…

1040

Abstract

The objectives of the study are the standardization of ten Nigerian dishes and the determination of their proximate composition. Recipes for the ten dishes were obtained through the use of questionnaires. There were 200 respondents to the questionnaires consisting of housewives living in the major towns of south‐western Nigeria. One recipe for each meal was extracted from a known cookery book. The means for each ingredient of all the dishes were calculated from ten randomly selected recipes and then used in the preparation of the standardized dishes. The standardized dishes are: Burabisko, Jollof rice, Agbono soup, Stewed beans and fried plantain, Bean pudding, Melon seed and vegetable soup, Ikokore, Eba imoyo, Yam and eggs and Yam pottage. Consumer acceptability tests were conducted as well as proximate analyses according to AOAC. All dishes were considered acceptable since they scored more than 3, the benchmark for acceptability. Energy content of the dishes ranged from 281Kcal/100g (Jollof rice) to 510Kcal/100g (Agbono soup). The crude protein content ranged from 7.5g/100g for Burabisko to 27.4g/100g for Jollof rice. The results suggest that these dishes are good sources of energy and protein.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

S.S. Nupo, C.R.B. Oguntona, O.O. Onabanjo and E.O. Fakoya

The aim of the study is to assess the dietary diversity score (DDS) and nutritional status of women in the University of Agriculture extension village in rural areas of Ogun…

348

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to assess the dietary diversity score (DDS) and nutritional status of women in the University of Agriculture extension village in rural areas of Ogun State, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative sample of 204 women was surveyed from the rural villages in two seasons using simple random technique. A pretested interview guide was used to collect information on personal data, and socio demographic characteristics of the subjects. Information on dietary diversity was obtained using Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance Project questionnaire (FANTA). Body mass index (BMI), waist‐hip ratio (WHR) and skin fold thickness were used in classifying obesity. Information on food intake was obtained from 24‐hour dietary recall techniques. For each season, a DDS was computed and the nutritional status was assessed. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics; SPSS software package version 16.0.

Findings

The socio economic characteristic revealed that more than half (53 percent) had no formal education, 59 percent were small scale farmers. The DDS increased from 3.55±7.6 to 3.93±4.3 between the two seasons. DDS within the various food groups showed that fruit group increased from 0.48±0.20 to 0.52.±0.10, vegetable group 0.60±0.30 to 0.66±0.30, and meat group 0.48±0.20 to 0.58±0.30 while cereals/grain groups and oil/dairies group decreased from 0.42±0.30 to 0.37, 0.11±0.30 to 0.09, respectively, between the two seasons. The nutrient content of the subjects was calculated from nutrient contents of foods obtained from food composition tables and compared to dietary reference intake (DRI). The results showed that the protein, energy and fat intakes of the subjects increased significantly during the rainy season (p<0.05). Two percent of the subjects gained weight, 4 percent had weight reduction from overweight and obese category. The result of the waist‐hip ratio showed that 78 percent had normal waist‐hip ratio, 14 percent had overweight, and 7 percent were obese. The dietary diversity score of the subjects was low. There is need for nutritional education in the villages.

Originality/value

This may be the first research work to assess the dietary diversity score of rural women in Nigeria.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Saheed Adewale Omoniyi, Michael Ayodele Idowu, Abiodun Aderoju Adeola and Adekunle Ayodeji Folorunso

This paper aims to review the chemical composition and industrial benefits of oil extracted from dikanut kernels.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the chemical composition and industrial benefits of oil extracted from dikanut kernels.

Design/methodology/approach

Several literatures on chemical composition of dikanut kernels, methods of oil extraction from dikanut kernels and chemical composition of oil extracted from dikanut kernels were critically reviewed.

Findings

The review showed that proximate composition of dikanut kernels ranged from 2.10 to 11.90 per cent, 7.70 to 9.24 per cent, 51.32 to 70.80 per cent, 0.86 to 10.23 per cent, 2.26 to 6.80 per cent and 10.72 to 26.02 per cent for moisture, crude protein, crude fat, crude fibre, ash and carbohydrate contents, respectively. The methods of oil extraction from dikanut kernels include soxhlet extraction method, novel extraction method, enzymatic extraction method and pressing method. The quality attributes of dikanut kernel oil ranged from 1.59 to 4.70 g/100g, 0.50 to 2.67 meq/Kg, 4.30 to 13.40 g/100g, 187.90 to 256.50 mg KOH/g and 3.18 to 12.94 mg KOH/g for free fatty acid, peroxide value, iodine value, saponification value and acid value, respectively. Also, the percentage compositions of oleic, myristic, stearic, linolenic, palmitic, lauric, saturated fatty acids, monosaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids ranging from 0.00 to 6.90, 20.50 to 61.68, 0.80 to 11.40, 0.27 to 6.40, 5.06 to 10.30, 27.63 to 40.70, 97.45 to 98.73, 1.82 to 2.12 and 0.27 to 0.49 respectively. The results showed that dikanut kernels has appreciable amount of protein, carbohydrate and high level of fat content while oil extracted from dikanut kernels have high saponification value, high myristic acid and high lauric acid.

Research limitations/implications

There are scanty information/published works on industrial products made from oil extracted from dikanut kernels.

Practical implications

The review helps in identifying different methods of extraction of oil from dikanut kernels apart from popular soxhlet extraction method (uses of organic solvent). Also, it helps to identify the domestic and industrial benefits of oil extracted from dikanut kernels.

Originality/value

The review showed that oil extracted from dikanut kernels could be useful as food additive, flavour ingredient, coating fresh citrus fruits and in the manufacture of margarine, oil creams, cooking oil, defoaming agent, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

S.O. Ismaila and T.M. Samuel

There is the need to focus on humans while designing engineering facilities for users. The need to focus on Nigerians when designing for them is presented in this paper. The paper…

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Abstract

Purpose

There is the need to focus on humans while designing engineering facilities for users. The need to focus on Nigerians when designing for them is presented in this paper. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literatures were consulted on the history of ergonomics and its importance was stressed. Some instances where ergonomics should be applied in the country were identified.

Findings

The paper observed that the application of ergonomics in Nigeria is low and some constraints that are militating against the use of ergonomics in Nigeria are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper suggested ways to fully imbibe the use of human-centered engineering (ergonomics) in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Fatai Abiola Sowunmi, Oladunni Akinwande Daramola and Ishaq Adewale Tijani

The economic recession that Nigeria recently passed through caused distortions in economic and well-being of Nigerians. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The economic recession that Nigeria recently passed through caused distortions in economic and well-being of Nigerians. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the economic recession on households’ demand for basic foodstuffs in Southwest Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 380 respondents drawn from urban areas of Lagos, Osun and Oyo states using multistage sampling technique. Descriptive statistics and Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System were employed to analyze data collected.

Findings

The study showed sharp increase in the prices of basic foodstuffs during recession. Households were compelled to spend higher percentage of their monthly income on basic foodstuffs. Also, 51.1 percent of the respondents were government workers who experienced inconsistent or modulated monthly salary during the period. The percentage of households that were food insecure was 36.4 percent. Osun State had the highest monthly per capita expenditure (₦5,147.13) on foodstuffs, followed by Lagos and Oyo states while rice had the highest expenditure share (0.26), followed by yam (0.18), beans (0.106), vegetable oil (0.104) and garri (0.101). The breakdown also showed that 11.7, 18.1 and 17.7 percent of the total household monthly expenditures in Lagos, Osun and Oyo states, respectively, were spent on basic foodstuffs.

Research limitations/implications

There purchasing power of naira reduced significantly during recession, thus compelled households to spend more on basic foodstuffs compared to similar purchases before economic recession.

Practical implications

The reduction in purchasing power of naira affected the formal and informal sector. Irregular salary for civil servants reduced their expenditure on goods and services.

Originality/value

The study is original and topical, serving as literature of accounts that transpired among the households as far as demand for basic foodstuffs is concerned during the economic recession.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

C.A. Agbon, O.O. Onabanjo and C.O. Akinyemi

Childhood under‐nutrition remains a major health problem in resource‐poor settings like the rural areas in Nigeria. The purpose of this paper is to determine the types and…

369

Abstract

Purpose

Childhood under‐nutrition remains a major health problem in resource‐poor settings like the rural areas in Nigeria. The purpose of this paper is to determine the types and nutrient adequacy of complementary foods used in a rural area.

Design/methodology/approach

The most frequently used (52 percent) homemade complementary food (HCF) in the area was studied, employing questionnaire, standardization of recipe and chemical analysis to evaluate the complementary food and to suggest improvement.

Findings

Two varieties of local beans (white and brown) were used in the preparation of HCF in the study area. They were either peeled to remove the coat or unpeeled. There was no significant difference (p<0.05) in the protein content of the HCF made from the two varieties. Using any of the beans unpeeled children between the ages of six and eight months meet their energy and protein requirement. The calcium, iron, and zinc contents of HCF from the two bean varieties were low.

Originality/value

This paper may be the first to evaluate HCF using mothers' method of preparation.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Wasiu A.O. Afolabi, Clara R.B. Oguntona and Bilkisu B. Fakunmoju

Reports a study to determine the suitability of beniseed for bread making as well as the chemical composition and acceptability of the bread among Nigerian bread consuming…

Abstract

Reports a study to determine the suitability of beniseed for bread making as well as the chemical composition and acceptability of the bread among Nigerian bread consuming population. Three bread samples were developed from wheat, beniseed, and cassava composite flour using the formulae 85:10:5, 80:15:5 and 75:25:5. Baking characteristics, chemical composition and acceptability tests were carried out on the samples with wheat bread serving as control. Results show that bread produced from beniseed composite flour has similar baking characteristics in terms of appearance, colour and flavour when compared with wheat bread. Consumer acceptability tests indicated that the bread samples were all acceptable, with the sample with formula 85:10:5 ranked first and being the most preferred. Analysis of chemical composition indicated that the bread samples contain higher protein, fat, crude fibre and ash. This study has shown that acceptable bread of higher nutritional value can be produced from beniseed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Olusola Omueti, E.B. Oguntona, Olayinka Jaiyeola and O.A. Ashaye

Freshly‐blanched soybean seeds, mixed with grains of freshly‐harvested green field maize were combined, in ratios of 5:1 (A), 4:1 (B), 3:1 (C); 2:1 (D), 1:0 (E) and 0:1 (F), to…

584

Abstract

Freshly‐blanched soybean seeds, mixed with grains of freshly‐harvested green field maize were combined, in ratios of 5:1 (A), 4:1 (B), 3:1 (C); 2:1 (D), 1:0 (E) and 0:1 (F), to prepare soy‐corn milk. Dried flakes of soy‐corn milk were analysed for their in vitro digestibility (IVD) and assessed on the performance of rats fed with the test materials. Protein content of the blends increased with the increased amount of soybean in the blend. The IVD of Blend C (88 per cent) was superior to the IVD of all other test blends but was similar to that of casein (90 per cent). Highest weight gain, feed intake, estimated nitrogen intake, PER, BV and NPU were associated with Blend C, and values reported for this blend compared favourably with a casein diet. Implications of the results are discussed in terms of searching for a means of combating malnutrition.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Pride Anya Ebile, Hycenth Tim Ndah and Jens Norbert Wünsche

Limited data are available in facilitating nutritional interventions in developing countries. The objective of this study is to assess the mean dietary diversity score (DDS)of…

Abstract

Purpose

Limited data are available in facilitating nutritional interventions in developing countries. The objective of this study is to assess the mean dietary diversity score (DDS)of Mbororo minority women in the Northwest region of Cameroon.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the random sampling technique within the Mbororo minority communities (Adorates). A questionnaire on dietary diversity, including 461 Mbororo women, provided information on food consumed using the 24-h dietary recall method.

Findings

Various socio-cultural and economic characteristics of the Mbororo women affected the nutrient level of their diet. Moreover, starchy staples, vitamin-A rich vegetables and palm oil and milk and milk products were consumed by more than half of the Mbororo community. Family herd size showed a positive influence on the dietary habit of the Mbororo population. The mean DDS significantly increased (p = 0.001), as herd size increased from below 50 (3.9 ± 1.1) to above 100 (4.8 ± 1.2).

Practical implications

Most of the diet consumed by the Mbororo women were low in iron, making them susceptible to nutrition anemia. The diet of the Aku women was more deficient in micronutrients than their Jaafun counterpart. These results indicate suitable areas of intervention for any nutrition program that targets the Mbororo minority group of Northwest Cameron.

Social implications

DDS can be used in assessing and classifying the population in rural communities according to the deficiencies in micronutrients of their diet.

Originality/value

The use of DDS to assess the nutrient quality of diets is frequently used to evaluate the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies but has never been applied to Mbororo minority women.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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