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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Bethany Holt

This paper aims to determine any barriers and gaps within one community Forensic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (FCAMHS) provision for young people presenting with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine any barriers and gaps within one community Forensic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (FCAMHS) provision for young people presenting with risk of harm to others or involvement with the youth justice system, from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents a systematic review of literature into the barriers and gaps within community FCAMHS, which showed little research in the area. Because of this, referral numbers for five major cities within the Yorkshire and Humber community FCAMHS region were compared to population statistics and youth justice caution and sentencing data.

Findings

Comparison suggests that BAME young people are under-represented across referrals to community FCAMHS. Also, there were differences in the representation of BAME young people when compared to youth justice data across the five major cities.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of literature, combined with disparities in proportional representation of BAME young people within the Yorkshire and Humber FCAMHS, shows the need for a detailed study and analysis within national community FCAMHS.

Practical implications

More needs to be done within community FCAMHS to ensure that services are meeting the needs of young people at risk of criminalisation.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, there is currently no published literature that explores ethnic representation and access to community-based FCAMH services. Exploration within one regional service suggests that young people from BAME backgrounds may be under-represented within such services, whilst at the same time being over-represented within formal criminal justice.

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2010

Anders Bengtsson, Fleura Bardhi and Meera Venkatraman

The brand management literature argues that the standardization of branding strategy across global markets leads to consistent and well‐defined brand meaning. The paper aims to…

15396

Abstract

Purpose

The brand management literature argues that the standardization of branding strategy across global markets leads to consistent and well‐defined brand meaning. The paper aims to challenge this thesis by empirically examining whether and how global brands travel with consumers. The paper studies how consumers create brand meanings at home and abroad as well as the impact of context (e.g. place) on the meaning of global brands for the same consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a qualitative approach to examine brand meanings for two prototypical global brands, McDonald's and Starbucks, at home and abroad. Data were collected through photo‐elicited interviews, personal diaries, and essays with 29 middle‐class American consumers before, during, and after a short‐term trip to China. Interviews lasted from 30 to 90 minutes and the data were analyzed using a hermeneutic approach.

Findings

Taking a cultural branding approach, the paper demonstrates that despite perceived standardized global brand platforms, consumers develop divergent brand meanings abroad. While at home, global brands have come to symbolize corporate excess, predatory intentions, and cultural homogenizations; abroad they evoke meanings of comfort, predictability, safety, and national pride. In foreign contexts, global brands become dwelling resources that enable travelers to sustain daily consumption rituals, evoke sensory experiences of home, as well as provide a comfortable and welcoming space.

Originality/value

The paper challenges the brand management literature assumption of a consistent brand image for standardized global brands. It shows that the cultural context (e.g. place) impacts consumer‐derived brand meanings even among the same group of consumers. Further, it argues that standardization offered by global brands provides an important symbolic value to mobile consumers of serving as an anchor to the home left behind.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Abstract

Details

Sensory Penalities: Exploring the Senses in Spaces of Punishment and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-727-0

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Janet L. Sims‐Wood

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the…

Abstract

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the Afro‐American experience and to show the joys, sorrows, needs, and ideals of the Afro‐American woman as she struggles from day to day.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Bethany Bryson

Draws on interviews with 76 English professors in 4 US universities to document emerging definitions of multiculturalism and connect them to organizational conditions in each…

1506

Abstract

Draws on interviews with 76 English professors in 4 US universities to document emerging definitions of multiculturalism and connect them to organizational conditions in each department. Suggests that findings showed that the professors assigned meaning to the ambiguous and contested word, multiculturalism, according to the principles of organizational convenience rather than poligical conviction. Emphasizes the power of institutional routines for withstanding ideological challenges and illuminates the mechanisms through which resistance operates.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Leadership and Power in International Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-116-0

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Lisa Fedina, Bethany L. Backes, Hyun-Jin Jun, Jordan DeVylder and Richard P. Barth

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship among police legitimacy/trust and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV), including victims’ decisions to…

1092

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship among police legitimacy/trust and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV), including victims’ decisions to report IPV to police and police responses to IPV.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were drawn from the 2017 Survey of Police–Public Encounters II – a cross-sectional, general population survey of adults from New York City and Baltimore (n=1,000). Regression analyses were used to examine associations among police legitimacy/trust, IPV exposure, police reporting of IPV, and perceived police responses to IPV and interaction effects.

Findings

Higher levels of IPV exposure were significantly associated with lower levels of police legitimacy/trust; however, this relationship was stronger among African–American participants than non-African–American participants. Higher levels of police legitimacy/trust were significantly associated with more positive police responses to IPV and this relationship was stronger among heterosexual participants than sexual minority participants.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine prospective relationships to understand causal mechanisms linking individual perceptions of police legitimacy/trust, experiences with IPV and victims’ interactions with police.

Practical implications

Low levels of legitimacy/trust between police and citizens may result, in part, if police are engaged in negative or inadequate responses to reports of IPV. Police–social work partnerships can enhance effective police responses to IPV, particularly to racial/ethnic and sexual minority individuals.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence linking police legitimacy/trust to the experiences of IPV and perceived police responses to reports of IPV, including important group differences among victims based on race/ethnicity and sexual orientation.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Bethany Driver and Verity Chester

Autistic women and girls have received comparatively less attention within clinical practice and research. Research suggests women tend to be diagnosed later than men, and are…

1934

Abstract

Purpose

Autistic women and girls have received comparatively less attention within clinical practice and research. Research suggests women tend to be diagnosed later than men, and are more likely to experience misdiagnosis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper aims to report a narrative literature review that examines research on the presentation, recognition, and diagnosis of autistic women and girls.

Findings

Findings suggest that autistic females present differently to males and highlight low recognition of the female presentation of autism among the general public, in social spheres, educational, clinical and forensic settings. This lack of recognition appears to affect the likelihood of females being referred for diagnosis, the reliability of diagnostic assessments and subsequent access to support.

Originality/value

Recommendations for clinical practice focus on initiatives to increase awareness of the female presentation of autism, improving the diagnostic process for females, increasing female representation within autism training and for future research to support these goals.

Abstract

Details

Leadership and Power in International Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-116-0

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

An astute and dedicated follower of The New York Times Book Review “Bestsellers” column may have noted an unusual entry in the hardcover bestseller list on September 11, 1983. The…

Abstract

An astute and dedicated follower of The New York Times Book Review “Bestsellers” column may have noted an unusual entry in the hardcover bestseller list on September 11, 1983. The nonfiction title popped up, in fifth place no less, and just as quickly went off the list in the next issue of NYTBR; but that is not what made the title unusual. What did is the fact that it was published by Thomas Nelson Publishers, a religious publishing house which claims to be the “world's leading Bible publisher,” and produces such giants for the bible‐buying world as The Open Bible, The New King James Version, and The Good News Bible, huge sellers all. The book which made the list in The New York Times Book Review, however, was not a bible, but a self‐help book called Tough Times Never Last But Tough People Do, by Robert H. Schuller, a radio/TV evangelist whose weekly programs claim a listening/viewing audience in the millions.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

1 – 10 of 21