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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Alison Taysum

This chapter addresses how Black, Asian Minority Ethnic (BAME) Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of Multi-academy Trusts (MATs) with track records of outstanding school…

Abstract

This chapter addresses how Black, Asian Minority Ethnic (BAME) Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of Multi-academy Trusts (MATs) with track records of outstanding school improvement navigate turbulence when leading school improvement to optimise students’ learning. There are different ideas of what it means to have equitable access and equitable outcomes in education systems, and beyond, and how to live a good life on the journey to both. These different ideas and values’ systems have different intersectionalities of recognition by ‘the other’ in societies. Crenshaw argues, once these intersectionalities of discrimination have been identified, it will be possible to understand what Dewey calls their intrinsic nature and to seek ways to reconnect the isolated, and marginalised that are subjects of discrimination. The BAME CEOs articulate the current Public Governance of Education Systems that induces fear of forced takeovers and job insecurity creates a kind of divide and conquer approach of colonialism and intersectionalities of discrimination. The chapter identifies BAME CEOs want to create cultures where they can make a commitment to take the time to know the self, in relationship with the other, and build bridges between different groups in society for equity, renewal, trust, and peace in our time. The BAME CEOs wishing to empower others to engage in this moral training for democracy in education need to have and share the thinking tools to prevent community members from being manipulated by people who wish to rush them into new ways of thinking and doing. Change requires giving mature citizens the time and space to think things through by: asking good questions, critiquing the evidence underpinning the change, inquiring into the logic of the change and holding the moral compass of the change to check the direction steers a sure and steady ethical course with what Adler calls the primary virtues of social justice, prudently and with courage.

Details

Turbulence, Empowerment and Marginalisation in International Education Governance Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-675-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2022

Mohammed Ishaq and Asifa Maaria Hussain

The research was aimed at gauging the experiences of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) staff working in academic and research libraries across the UK, part of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The research was aimed at gauging the experiences of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) staff working in academic and research libraries across the UK, part of the higher education and public sector significantly under researched.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an essentially qualitative approach involving a focus group and in-depth interviews, the research design aimed to capture the lived experiences of BAME library employees.

Findings

BAME employees are very conscious of their ethnicity due to a feeling of being monitored and under pressure to perform to a higher standard. BAME staff are subjected to verbal racism including microaggression from co-workers. There is no adequate mechanism in place to address the concerns of BAME staff and represent their interests. BAME employees are overrepresented at lower ends of the profession and are not encouraged by line managers to pursue promotion opportunities leading to a distinct lack of diversity at the top level of academic libraries.

Research limitations/implications

There are implications for the work experience and career development of BAME library staff, for the leadership and management of libraries and the wider higher education sector to reflect upon.

Originality/value

Based on real life experiences of BAME staff, this research plugs a gap in a neglected area of the public and higher education sector and provides an opportunity for managers of academic libraries to reflect on the issues raised and consider interventions.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Valerie Lipman

The purpose of this paper is to explore current provision of targeted social care services for the growing populations of Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) older people in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore current provision of targeted social care services for the growing populations of Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) older people in England and Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a mixed study. Following a review of the policy and research literature, 12 semi-structured interviews were undertaken in 2013/2014. Most participants were recruited from BAME policy and service provider organisations and organisations focusing on older people.

Findings

There is some evidence that BAME voluntary organisations are experiencing disproportionately greater funding cuts than mainstream voluntary service providers: moreover some mainstream providers reported reducing services targeted at BAME older people, while others expressed the view that choices for BAME older people are likely to become more limited following recent health and equalities policy changes.

Practical implications

Practitioners should contribute to data collection about protected characteristics, such as race/ethnicity to establish if BAME older people’s needs are being assessed equitably, whether access to care and support is easy; and how market-shaping at local levels can ensure a range of providers.

Originality/value

This study provides an overview of voluntary sector provision for the growing numbers of BAME older people in need of care and support that should be useful to practitioners and service commissioners.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Mariama Seray Kandeh, Mariama Korrca Kandeh, Nicola Martin and Joanna Krupa

Little is known about the way autism is interpreted and accepted among the black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations in the UK. This report summarises a…

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Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the way autism is interpreted and accepted among the black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations in the UK. This report summarises a Symposium on autism in the UK-BAME community in 2018, organised by Autism Voice UK, Participatory Autism Research Collective and the Critical Autism and Disabilities Studies Research Group at London South Bank University.

Design/methodology/approach

The stance a family or community takes about a condition such as autism is influenced by their cultural background. The aims of the Symposium were to highlight different perspectives about autism in BAME communities and to preserve the cultural dignity of the community in supporting autistic members. Beliefs about autism, its diagnosis and acceptance of and support for autistic people from a specific cultural perspective of BAME communities must be cautiously interpreted by autism professionals because beliefs vary among different cultural groups.

Findings

Thematic analysis of feedback from participants yielded the following foci. Firstly, cultural, ethnic and religious sensitivities were important to participants who felt that these were often ignored by non-BAME professionals. Secondly, the need for collaboration to improve autism awareness within the community and understanding by professionals of the intersectionality between autism and identity in BAME families was prioritised. Thirdly, issues around feelings of stigma were common, but delegates felt that these were not well understood beyond people identifying as BAME.

Originality/value

An action plan was created which highlighted raising public awareness through community engagement, improvement of access to information for parents and culturally aware autism education for professionals and BAME communities.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Marilyn J. Davidson, Sandra L. Fielden and Azura Omar

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the positive and negative effects of gender and ethnicity in relation to discrimination and the problems encountered in accessing…

4320

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the positive and negative effects of gender and ethnicity in relation to discrimination and the problems encountered in accessing social support (including emotional and instrumental support).

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected through in‐depth interviews with 40 Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) female small business owners based in north west England. The main aims and objectives of the study were to: investigate the discriminatory experiences of BAME female small business owners related to their gender and ethnicity; and to identify the forms (formal and informal) and types (emotional/instrumental) of social support available in relation to their entrepreneurial activities that enabled them to cope with and overcome, the discrimination they may encounter.

Findings

Over half of the respondents in the study had experienced discriminations because of their gender, ethnic background or both. This was attributed to a number of factors, including stereotypical images of specific ethnic cultures, religions and practices. Many respondents reported difficulties in accessing different types of formal social support, e.g. formal business and financial support. Informal support by respondents' families was reported as a key source of both emotional and instrumental.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is just a starting point for this area of research and, because the sample covers women from a variety of BAME backgrounds, it is not possible to generalize the findings to the wider population of BAME women. However, it does give an indication of what issues need to be considered in the provision of instrumental support for BAME women small business owners.

Practical implications

The paper shows that a key element in the development of a strategy for addressing the needs of the BAME female small business owners is the necessity to appropriately re‐design mainstream business support systems and financial services, in order to provide these women effective access to formal social support.

Originality/value

The experiences of BAME small business owners have received little attention and this paper offers a unique insight into the relationship between social support, gender, ethnicity and business ownership.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Sandra Fielden and Marilyn J. Davidson

The aim of this paper is to explore the intersection between gender and ethnicity in relation to discrimination and the problems encountered in accessing social support…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the intersection between gender and ethnicity in relation to discrimination and the problems encountered in accessing social support (including emotional and instrumental support) experienced by Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) women business owners.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected through in‐depth interviews with 40 BAME women small business owners based in North West England. The main aims and objectives of the study were to: investigate the discriminatory experiences of BAME women small business owners related to the intersection between their gender and ethnicity, and to identify the forms (formal and informal) and types (emotional/instrumental) of social support available in relation to their entrepreneurial activities that enabled them to cope with and overcome, the discrimination they may encounter.

Findings

The degree of discrimination experienced was reported as a result of gender, ethnic background or an intersection between both. This was attributed to a number of factors, including stereotypical difficulties in accessing different types of formal social support, e.g. formal business and financial support. Informal support by respondents' families was reported as a key source of both emotional and instrumental support.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is just a starting point for this area of research and, because the sample covers women from a variety of BAME backgrounds, it is not possible to generalise the findings to the wider population of BAME women. However, it does give an indication of what issues need to be considered in the provision of instrumental support for BAME women small business owners.

Practical implications

The paper shows that a key element in the development of a strategy for addressing the needs of the BAME women small business owners is the necessity to appropriately re‐design mainstream business support systems and financial services, in order to provide these women effective access to formal social support.

Originality/value

The experiences of BAME women small business owners have received little attention and this paper offers a unique insight into the relationship between how the intersection between gender and ethnicity impact on experiences of discrimination and social support. Whilst it highlights many intra group differences, it has also demonstrated the lack of homogeneity between and within women from different ethnic backgrounds.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Simisola Akintoye, George Ogoh, Zoi Krokida, Juliana Nnadi and Damian Eke

Digital contact tracing technologies are critical to the fight against COVID-19 in many countries including the UK. However, a number of ethical, legal and socio-economic…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital contact tracing technologies are critical to the fight against COVID-19 in many countries including the UK. However, a number of ethical, legal and socio-economic concerns that can affect uptake of the app have been raised. The purpose of this research is to explore the perceptions of the UK digital contact tracing app in the Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) community in Leicester and how this can affect its deployment and implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected through virtual focus groups in Leicester, UK. A total of 28 participants were recruited for the study. All participants are members of the BAME community, and data was thematically analysed with NVivo 11.

Findings

A majority of the participants were unwilling to download and use the app owing to legal and ethical concerns. A minority were willing to use the app based on the need to protect public health. There was a general understanding that lack of uptake will negatively affect the fight against COVID-19 in BAME communities and an acknowledgement of the need for the government to rebuild trust through transparency and development of regulatory safeguards to enhance privacy and prevent misuse.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the research makes original contributions being the first robust study conducted to explore perceptions of marginalised communities, particularly BAME which may be adversely impacted by the deployment of the app. By exploring community-based perceptions, this study further contributes to the emerging citizens’ perceptions on digital contact tracing which is crucial to the effectiveness and the development of an efficient, community-specific response to public attitudes towards the app. The findings can also help the development of responsible innovation approaches that balances the competing interests of digital health interventions with the needs and expectations of the BAME community in the UK.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Godi Katito and Emma Davies

Despite the health benefits of physical activity (PA), participation rates Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) adults in the United Kingdom (UK) are low in comparison…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the health benefits of physical activity (PA), participation rates Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) adults in the United Kingdom (UK) are low in comparison to the general population. This study aimed to explore the social-ecological factors related to PA participation among BAME immigrants.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 12 purposively selected adults from the BAME populace residing in one postcode district of a city in southern England.

Findings

The three main themes that developed from this study demonstrated that the barriers to PA participation among BAME were perceived to exist at intrapersonal, and environmental (social and physical) levels.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding these unique social-ecological factors may assist in intervention development.

Originality/value

Prominent barriers included intrapersonal factors such as deportation fear and cultural beliefs; and environmental factors such as the cost of accessing PA facilities. Length of residency appeared to be related to increased PA.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Eula Miller, Stella Foluke Bosun-Arjie and Mandu Stephen Ekpenyong

The purpose of this study was to examine and synthesise the empirical evidence on the perceptions of Black and Ethnic Minority (BAME) carers views on mental health (MH…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine and synthesise the empirical evidence on the perceptions of Black and Ethnic Minority (BAME) carers views on mental health (MH) services and support offered in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive search conducted by searching Medline, Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection served to identify relevant studies that explored the perceptions of BAME carers on MH services. Other key sources and reference list of identified journal articles were searched to ascertain that this review contains all relevant studies and captured studies not indexed in the databases. Using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool, 20 relevant studies published between 1996 and 2020 retrieved were and reviewed. From the reviewed papers five themes emerged which summarised the perception of BAME carers views on MH services and support services offered in the UK.

Findings

Critical appraisal of 20 studies that met the ascribed inclusion criteria was undertaken. A total of 18 studies were of qualitative design, one used a quantitative approach and one was a systematic review. Several themes addressing the participants’ views were identified from the studies. The core themes central to these studies were: awareness and utilization of available MH services, language barriers to accessing MH services, positive experience whilst in contact with MH services, negative experience whilst in contact with MH services and difficulties in seeking help.

Research limitations/implications

One of the review criteria was to focus on peer-reviewed articles; grey literature was exempted from the search for relevant studies. Although a systematic literature review was conducted, there is the possibility that some appropriate studies were not identified. This could be because of different use of key terms in some of the studies. Papers that identified and acknowledged BAME MH carers and MH services were focused on, which resulted in 20 eligible studies for synthesis.

Originality/value

This review revealed the perception of BAME carers on MH services and available support offered. It highlighted that a significant number of BAME carers had limited understanding of the range of available MH services and support on offer within the UK. The review highlighted that fear of stigmatisation, discrimination in conjunction with the formulaic nature of MH services, delayed at best and inhibited at worst BAME Carers from accessing support from MH services, which consequentially had detrimental effects on service users receiving the timely appropriate support needed (Mermon et al., 2016). It is, therefore, a recommended imperative that MH services are deliberate in their endeavour to be inclusive, culturally embracing and accessible, if the MH needs of diverse ethnic minority groups within the UK are to be met appropriately.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Mariam Vahdaninia, Bibha Simkhada, Edwin van Teijlingen, Hannah Blunt and Alan Mercel-Sanca

Mental health disparities exist among Black, Asian and Minority Ethnics (BAME) populations. This paper aims to provide an overview of mental health services designed for…

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Abstract

Purpose

Mental health disparities exist among Black, Asian and Minority Ethnics (BAME) populations. This paper aims to provide an overview of mental health services designed for the BAME population in the UK, both established BAME communities and refugee/asylum-seekers.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies conducted within the past decade in the UK. Using the Arksey and O’Malley methodology, data were extracted, analysed and summarised.

Findings

A total of 13 papers were identified, mostly non-randomised community-based. Studies were very heterogeneous in terms of their sample and service provided. After the initial appraisal, the authors presented a narrative synthesis. Overall, all studies reported positive mental health outcomes and beneficial effects.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the time limitations and quality of the papers, the authors only included peer-reviewed journal papers.

Practical implications

Mental health services provided for BAME people, both established and refugee/asylum-seekers are feasible and improve engagement with the services and mental health outcomes. Initiatives are required to facilitate the integration of these targeted services within mental health and community services for BAME in the UK.

Originality/value

This scoping review is a snapshot of the mental health services designed for BAME people in the UK, either established or refugee/asylum-seekers in the past 10 years and adds to the evidence-based knowledge from these studies.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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