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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

K.L. Choy, Harry K.H. Chow, W.B. Lee and Felix T.S. Chan

To develop a performance measurement system (PMS) in the application of supplier relationship management operated under a supply chain benchmarking framework. Acting as a…

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6116

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a performance measurement system (PMS) in the application of supplier relationship management operated under a supply chain benchmarking framework. Acting as a monitoring tool for evaluating the performance of maintenance logistics providers against the defined performance levels stated in the contract, and facilitating the application of benchmarking approach in maintenance logistics activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A six tiers collaborative management model is designed in building the PMS, by which information sharing of performance history of suppliers is made possible. By following the work flow of the PMS, performance of suppliers is benchmarked with the best‐in‐class supplier, resulting in the identification of the most appropriate supplier for the particular requirement.

Findings

PMS helps a company and its suppliers to understand the performance gap between its service levels with the best‐in‐class practice. The resulting performance gap provides valuable information in the formulating of a new supply chain and strategic plan in solving problems and challenges in aviation industry. By means of PMS, a company can make decisions with the basis of a good relationship with its business partners, especially in the maintenance logistics area.

Research limitations/implications

The design of PMS must take into consideration of the data sources, the duration of taking the required data, and the focal point on collecting information. Moreover, findings from the study have to be revised every two years.

Originality/value

By applying PMS in one of the leading airlines in Hong Kong, suppliers' deficiencies in the logistics performance are identified easily. Moreover, current operational service level is effectively enhanced and the combination of the best‐in‐class supplier service package is accurately selected.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Lawrence S. Pryor

Benchmarking can improve strategic and operational effectiveness by forcing companies to evaluate their efforts compared to “best in class” firms and identify ways to…

Abstract

Benchmarking can improve strategic and operational effectiveness by forcing companies to evaluate their efforts compared to “best in class” firms and identify ways to enhance that performance.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Gordon Stewart

Describes a comprehensive set of fact‐based performance measuresthat can be used to describe accurately a world‐class supply chain ofplan, source, make and deliver…

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13558

Abstract

Describes a comprehensive set of fact‐based performance measures that can be used to describe accurately a world‐class supply chain of plan, source, make and deliver activities. Aims to help companies take a broad supply‐chain‐process perspective by quantifying performance improvement opportunities across the entire supply chain. Includes quantitative measures such as cash‐to‐cash cycle time and supply chain response time, as well as qualitative analysis of best‐in‐class performance. Best practice benchmarks provide more insight into how to achieve world‐class performance.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Ravi S. Behara and Jos G.A.M. Lemmink

Notes that after‐sales field service has become an established competitive differentiator among equipment manufacturers. From the service provider’s perspective, effective…

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1417

Abstract

Notes that after‐sales field service has become an established competitive differentiator among equipment manufacturers. From the service provider’s perspective, effective field service management is essential for operational productivity, customer satisfaction and retention, and profitability. Benchmarking is a process for measuring a firm’s performance against the best‐in‐class, and using such an analysis to meet or exceed the best‐in‐class performance. Develops a benchmarking approach that utilizes customer satisfaction survey results in conjunction with a zero defects metric. The applicability of this method is demonstrated through its use in competitive and internal benchmarking of equipment field services in the case of a European office‐equipment manufacturer.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2015

Wilfried von Eiff

Hospitals worldwide are facing the same opportunities and threats: the demographics of an aging population; steady increases in chronic diseases and severe illnesses; and…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospitals worldwide are facing the same opportunities and threats: the demographics of an aging population; steady increases in chronic diseases and severe illnesses; and a steadily increasing demand for medical services with more intensive treatment for multi-morbid patients. Additionally, patients are becoming more demanding. They expect high quality medicine within a dignity-driven and painless healing environment.

The severe financial pressures that these developments entail oblige care providers to more and more cost-containment and to apply process reengineering, as well as continuous performance improvement measures, so as to achieve future financial sustainability. At the same time, regulators are calling for improved patient outcomes. Benchmarking and best practice management are successfully proven performance improvement tools for enabling hospitals to achieve a higher level of clinical output quality, enhanced patient satisfaction, and care delivery capability, while simultaneously containing and reducing costs.

Approach

This chapter aims to clarify what benchmarking is and what it is not. Furthermore, it is stated that benchmarking is a powerful managerial tool for improving decision-making processes that can contribute to the above-mentioned improvement measures in health care delivery. The benchmarking approach described in this chapter is oriented toward the philosophy of an input–output model and is explained based on practical international examples from different industries in various countries.

Findings

Benchmarking is not a project with a defined start and end point, but a continuous initiative of comparing key performance indicators, process structures, and best practices from best-in-class companies inside and outside industry.

Benchmarking is an ongoing process of measuring and searching for best-in-class performance:

  • Measure yourself with yourself over time against key performance indicators

  • Measure yourself against others

  • Identify best practices

  • Equal or exceed this best practice in your institution

  • Focus on simple and effective ways to implement solutions

Measure yourself with yourself over time against key performance indicators

Measure yourself against others

Identify best practices

Equal or exceed this best practice in your institution

Focus on simple and effective ways to implement solutions

Comparing only figures, such as average length of stay, costs of procedures, infection rates, or out-of-stock rates, can lead easily to wrong conclusions and decision making with often-disastrous consequences. Just looking at figures and ratios is not the basis for detecting potential excellence. It is necessary to look beyond the numbers to understand how processes work and contribute to best-in-class results. Best practices from even quite different industries can enable hospitals to leapfrog results in patient orientation, clinical excellence, and cost-effectiveness.

Originality/value

Despite common benchmarking approaches, it is pointed out that a comparison without “looking behind the figures” (what it means to be familiar with the process structure, process dynamic and drivers, process institutions/rules and process-related incentive components) will be extremely limited referring to reliability and quality of findings.

In order to demonstrate transferability of benchmarking results between different industries practical examples from health care, automotive, and hotel service have been selected.

Additionally, it is depicted that international comparisons between hospitals providing medical services in different health care systems do have a great potential for achieving leapfrog results in medical quality, organization of service provision, effective work structures, purchasing and logistics processes, or management, etc.

Details

International Best Practices in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-278-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Per V. Freytag and Svend Hollensen

Benchmarking is more than giving marks. It is a way of measuring a firm’s strategies and performance against "best‐in‐class” firms, both inside and outside the industry…

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8706

Abstract

Benchmarking is more than giving marks. It is a way of measuring a firm’s strategies and performance against "best‐in‐class” firms, both inside and outside the industry. The aim is to identify best practices that can be adopted and implemented by the organization with the purpose of improving a company’s performance. The process of benchmarking is divided into seven phases: which functions to benchmark; importance of each subject area; whom to benchmark against; gather the benchmarking information; identify performance gaps; how to learn from the “best‐in‐class” (benchlearning); and implementation of the changes (benchaction). Benchmarking, benchlearning and benchaction is not a one‐time project. It is a continuous improvement strategy and a change management process. Thus benchmarking is a part of the total quality management (TQM) system, and it relates well to other TQM initiatives.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Togar M. Simatupang and Ramaswami Sridharan

Intense competition forces companies to become involved in supply chain collaboration with their upstream and downstream partners. The key to ensuring that the…

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7284

Abstract

Intense competition forces companies to become involved in supply chain collaboration with their upstream and downstream partners. The key to ensuring that the participating members are progressing on the right track of creating the best‐in‐class practice is to conduct benchmarking. Benchmarking stimulates collective learning for performance improvement that brings benefits to all participating members. However, previous research has focused mainly on supply chain benchmarking at the intra‐company ‐‐ rather than the inter‐company ‐‐ level. Inter‐company benchmarking requires a new perspective for understanding collaborative learning amongst the participating members that encourages them to improve supply chain performance as a whole. This research aims to develop a benchmarking scheme for supply chain collaboration that links collaborative performance metrics and collaborative enablers. The proposed benchmarking scheme can be used to examine the current status of supply chain collaboration among the participating members, identify performance gaps and systematize improvement initiatives.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Investigates the fourth annual survey of practices in productdevelopment by Product Development Consulting, Inc. and the ManagementRoundtable. Focuses on best practices in…

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1014

Abstract

Investigates the fourth annual survey of practices in product development by Product Development Consulting, Inc. and the Management Roundtable. Focuses on best practices in product definition. Concludes that several product definition practices distinguish best‐in‐class companies and goes on to list these.

Details

World Class Design to Manufacture, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-3074

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Lawrence S. Pryor and Steven J. Katz

This producer of specialized industrial products with high margins was suffering from slow growth. So it benchmarked its sales effectiveness against four direct…

Abstract

This producer of specialized industrial products with high margins was suffering from slow growth. So it benchmarked its sales effectiveness against four direct competitors, a non‐competitor in its industry, and one of the best sales forces in the nation. This case study also looks at implementation after three years.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Kong Fah Tee

Overall, the UK’s representation in the top 100 in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings has declined since 2011. The basic rationale of the project is to…

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1149

Abstract

Purpose

Overall, the UK’s representation in the top 100 in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings has declined since 2011. The basic rationale of the project is to improve performance of universities generally and their standings in rankings particularly. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The key research questions of this study ask which performance indicators should be improved and which benchmarking partners should be chosen. Two selected universities have been chosen as featured case studies to illustrate the proposed template.

Findings

A user-friendly template for benchmarking has been developed as a tool for self-evaluation and self-improvement by having a systematic comparison of appropriate measures of performance among the universities in the UK. The template can be extended by identifying internal and external benchmarking partners for the corresponding indicators.

Research limitations/implications

There is more work to be done during and after the formal benchmarking activity which has not been addressed in the template.

Practical implications

This is a practical approach. It is very simple to be implemented for self-evaluation and self-improvement.

Social implications

Once completed it will help institutions to assess their performance, identify areas for benchmarking and select internal and external partners.

Originality/value

This is a new and practical approach. The proposed template is designed to be used before the formal benchmarking activities or site visits.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 64 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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