Search results

1 – 10 of over 45000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Abdulrazzak Charbaji, Tarek Mikdashi and Hadi Chebaro

The past two decades have seen the emergence of a growing interest in using quantitative techniques in decision making. This study investigated “extent of use” and…

Abstract

The past two decades have seen the emergence of a growing interest in using quantitative techniques in decision making. This study investigated “extent of use” and “barriers to using quantitative techniques.” Results suggest that managers over time and across boundaries, have shown weakness in using quantitative techniques. Lebanese managers in the banking industry in particular are unaware of quantitative techniques and intuitive in nature and they rely less on hard data and/or sophisticated models. The debate is no longer about “why use quantitative technique” but about “how should quantitative techniques be used?” As every profession is expected to change, so will the teacher's and the most significant and urgent question at the moment is how to train academic staff to practice what they preach.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Clive Nancarrow, Alexander Moskvin and Avi Shankar

Discusses ways in which qualitative techniques might be incorporated in quantitative research and quantitative techniques in qualitative research ‐ a transfer of techniques

Abstract

Discusses ways in which qualitative techniques might be incorporated in quantitative research and quantitative techniques in qualitative research ‐ a transfer of techniques. Explores the use of neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP) and projective techniques in quantitative research. Reports the results of customizing a self‐completion questionnaire to a respondent’s preferred representational system (PRS). This application of NLP produced encouraging findings. Provides suggestions for further research. Describes an example of how NLP and projective techniques can benefit a quantitative study with a case study in which TRBI’s BrandWorks was used. Suggests that, although the adoption by qualitative researchers of techniques used in quantitative research focuses on computer applications, the recent academic interest in the use of text analysers has not been matched by practitioners. Discusses issues related to quality, validity, transparency and value, and reports the findings of a survey of the largest qualitative marketing research suppliers. Finally, examines the use of correspondence analysis and describes ways in which correspondence analysis might benefit the qualitative researcher.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

A. Olaleye, B.T. Aluko and C.A. Ajayi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that have influenced the use of implicit (naïve) techniques in property portfolio diversification evaluation in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that have influenced the use of implicit (naïve) techniques in property portfolio diversification evaluation in the Nigeria property market. This is necessitated by the need to look at the ways by which the property portfolio diversification evaluation practice in the market could be made to improve and adjust to ever changing global trends in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors of this paper administered questionnaires, backed up with interviews, on 28 institutional property investors and 128 real estate practitioners in three locations (commercial nerve centres) of the country, namely, Lagos, Abuja and Port‐Harcourt metropolitan areas. Data were analysed with the use of frequency distribution, mean and standard deviation measures, relative importance index and Pearson Chi‐Square test.

Findings

The results of the study in this paper revealed, among others, that lack of time series data and the small size of many of the investors' portfolios in Nigeria encouraged the use of implicit analysis in their property portfolio evaluation techniques. The study also showed that investors and practitioners detest complex calculations and were using traditional evaluation techniques because they considered the methods as needing no pre‐requisite knowledge before they could be used.

Practical implications

The study in the paper concluded that there is the need for a restructuring of the Nigerian real estate education and portfolio evaluation practice and the use of a micro‐real estate specific data derived from local market information to develop property performance indices towards building up functional real estate indices at the regional and national levels.

Originality/value

This paper is a pioneering attempt at establishing the factors that influenced the use of implicit techniques in property portfolio diversification evaluation in emerging property markets like Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Peter Hofer, Christoph Eisl and Albert Mayr

– The purpose of this paper is a comparison of forecasting behaviour of small and large Austrian firms, analysing their forecast practices in a volatile business environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is a comparison of forecasting behaviour of small and large Austrian firms, analysing their forecast practices in a volatile business environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis of the paper, deductive by nature, was conducted by means of a quantitative online-survey (199 data sets). The relationship of perceived volatility and forecast predictability was evaluated by correlation analysis. t-Test and analysis of variances were used to examine significant differences in the forecast characteristics between small and large Austrian companies and different industries.

Findings

The study provides evidence that the surveyed companies have been hit by volatility, showing that Austrian SMEs are significantly more severely affected than large companies. The increasing volatility correlates with a reduced forecast predictability of sales quantities and commodity prices. Large Austrian companies primarily use a broad spectrum of qualitative forecasting methods. In contrast, Austrian SMEs utilize simple quantitative and qualitative forecast techniques, like the forward projection of historical data.

Research limitations/implications

Relevant for the forecasting of small and large companies.

Practical implications

Although management requests a broad spectrum of forecast qualities, the current usage of less sophisticated methods reveals a gap between intention and reality. Companies that supplement their qualitative techniques by sophisticated quantitative ones should expect less forecast bias.

Originality/value

This paper initially compares forecast methods in large and small Austrian firms and additionally provides the impact of volatility on the forecast predictability.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Tillal Eldabi, Zahir Irani, Ray J. Paul and Peter E.D. Love

Discrete event simulation (DES) is widely known to be a quantitative research tool. A simulation modelling process is mainly based on feeding quantitative data into a…

Abstract

Discrete event simulation (DES) is widely known to be a quantitative research tool. A simulation modelling process is mainly based on feeding quantitative data into a model to produce quantitative results in a structured sequential process. Qualitative approaches to research take a less structured approach with more of an inclination towards judgmental and expert knowledge rather than hard data. In this paper the authors suggest that DES can be employed as both a qualitative and quantitative research tool. The paper demonstrates how simulation may represent both stances either separately or combined. This is based on the fact that the basic objectives of simulation are either for understanding – which needs a qualitative perspective – or performance measurement – which a needs quantitative perspective. Traditional quantitative and qualitative methods are discussed showing how DES might cope with the weaknesses of both stances. A structure for using DES as a combined research methodology is proposed.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Dilanthi Amaratunga, David Baldry, Marjan Sarshar and Rita Newton

Built environment research consists of cognitive and affective, as well as behavioural, components. Existing built environment research utilises either strong qualitative…

Abstract

Built environment research consists of cognitive and affective, as well as behavioural, components. Existing built environment research utilises either strong qualitative or, more often, strong quantitative methodologies. Aims to discuss some of the philosophical issues that would be considered when undertaking academic research into the built environment. Considers the available research options or paradigms and suggests ways in which a researcher can make an informed and sensible decision as to how to proceed. The main dimensions of the debate about the relative characteristics and merits of quantitative and qualitative methodology are outlined, developing the argument that the use of a single methodology often fails to explore all of these components. The use of a mixed methods approach is suggested to counteract this weakness and to enhance research into the built environment.

Details

Work Study, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Lynne Bowker

The purpose of this paper is to generate awareness of and interest in the techniques used in computer-based corpus linguistics, focusing on their methodological…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to generate awareness of and interest in the techniques used in computer-based corpus linguistics, focusing on their methodological implications for research in library and information science (LIS).

Design/methodology/approach

This methodology paper provides an overview of computer-based corpus linguistics, describes the main techniques used in this field, assesses its strengths and weaknesses, and presents examples to illustrate the value of corpus linguistics to LIS research.

Findings

Overall, corpus-based techniques are simple, yet powerful, and they support both quantitative and qualitative analyses. While corpus methods alone may not be sufficient for research in LIS, they can be used to complement and to help triangulate the findings of other methods. Corpus linguistics techniques also have the potential to be exploited more fully in LIS research that involves a higher degree of automation (e.g. recommender systems, knowledge discovery systems, and text mining).

Practical implications

Numerous LIS researchers have drawn attention to the lack of diversity in research methods used in this field, and suggested that approaches permitting mixed methods research are needed. If LIS researchers learn about the potential of computer-based corpus methods, they can diversify their approaches.

Originality/value

Over the past quarter century, corpus linguistics has established itself as one of the main methods used in the field of linguistics, but its potential has not yet been realized by researchers in LIS. Corpus linguistics tools are readily available and relatively straightforward to apply. By raising awareness about corpus linguistics, the author hopes to make these techniques available as additional tools in the LIS researcher’s methodological toolbox, thus broadening the range of methods applied in this field.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Girish Prayag

The purpose of this paper is to assess the brand image of Cape Town as a tourist destination using a progressive method of unstructured and structured techniques such as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the brand image of Cape Town as a tourist destination using a progressive method of unstructured and structured techniques such as word association and free association.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method study was designed incorporating two phases. Phase one involved in‐depth interviews with a convenience sample of 85 international visitors to Cape Town. Phase two consisted of a survey, which resulted in 585 useable questionnaires that incorporated both open and closed‐ended questions.

Findings

The results indicate the strengths and weaknesses of each technique used. For example, word association is effective at eliciting positive images and holistic impressions but weak at identifying affective images. The free‐choice technique offers a more balanced perception of positive, negative, cognitive and affective images of a brand.

Research limitations/implications

It is possible through the use of unstructured and structured techniques together to identify commonality in image perceptions but also differences in such perceptions on the basis of visitors' demographic and travelling characteristics.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the strengths and weaknesses of techniques such as word association and free association. The results indicate that some image attributes may not always adequately differentiate the brand from its competitors.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to understand the relationship between three components of brand knowledge namely, image, differentiating attributes and choice factors in the context of an African city brand.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Matthew R. Johnson, Nick J. Wagner and Jonathan Reusch

The purpose of this paper is to analyze author and methodological characteristics in top-tier publications in higher education. As the importance of research in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze author and methodological characteristics in top-tier publications in higher education. As the importance of research in the professoriate continues to grow and faculty face ratcheted-up expectations for prestige in their research, such data are important contextually and historically.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study examines 587 articles within four top-tier higher education research journals from 2008 to 2012. Data were open coded and analyzed with a research team, resulting in an intercoder reliability of 0.96.

Findings

Results show most authors are assistant professors, overwhelmingly received PhD’s from very high research institutions (Carnegie classification), and currently work in similar institutions. Five degree-granting institutions accounted for 29.0 percent of publications in top-tier journals. Additionally, quantitative research accounted for 60.6 percent of published articles, with regression as the most commonly used analytic technique (34.7 percent).

Research limitations/implications

This study examined only higher education faculty and institutions based in the USA as well as first authors.

Practical implications

These results are meant to provide baseline data for top-tier journals within higher education and might inform conversations about methodological acceptability, respectability of qualitative research, graduate education research requirements, journal editor trainings, and tenure and promotion criteria.

Originality/value

This paper provides an update to previous studies that examined publications in higher education within the last three decades. In addition, this study examines author characteristics, which previous studies have mostly excluded. This study offers empirical data to inform conversations about the state of research in top-tier publications within higher education.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Garry G. Azgaldov and Alexander V. Kostin

The purpose of this paper is to provide the reader, who may have little or no knowledge of qualimetry, with first, an outline of the history and development of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide the reader, who may have little or no knowledge of qualimetry, with first, an outline of the history and development of this relatively new scientific discipline, which deals with the methodology of and problems in the integral quantitative assessment of the quality of objects of any nature: things and processes, products of labour and products of nature, whether material or ideal, animate or inanimate, simple or complex, natural or man‐made, etc.; and second, the most common errors that occur in the design and application of quality assessment techniques, which result in the depreciation of findings obtained by these techniques, and methods for eliminating such errors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used to obtain the results described in the paper is based on a deductive‐axiomatic approach and, occasionally, on expert judgements.

Findings

The findings presented in the paper can raise the research community's awareness of the great opportunities that the qualimetry toolbox offers them in addressing their problems; at the same time, they can help them to avoid many pitfalls.

Practical implications

The information found in the paper broadens the range of business problems and problem‐solving procedures that can make use of qualimetric techniques and approaches.

Originality/value

The vast majority of the readers of this journal will find information contained in this paper both novel and potentially useful.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 45000