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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2022

Narottam Yadav, Mathiyazhagan Kaliyan, Tarik Saikouk, Susobhan Goswami and Ömer Faruk Görçün

The present paper proposes a framework for zero-defect manufacturing in Indian industries. Due to the current competitive market, there is a strong need to achieve zero

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper proposes a framework for zero-defect manufacturing in Indian industries. Due to the current competitive market, there is a strong need to achieve zero defects from the customer's perspective. A survey questionnaire is analyzed based on the responses and a structured framework is drafted to implement zero defect manufacturing in the Indian industry.

Design/methodology/approach

To analyze zero-defect in Indian industries, a literature review and a survey questionnaire constituted a framework. This framework is independent of the type of process and product.

Findings

The findings of this study are based on a total of 925 responses received through survey questionnaires by different mediums. The framework has been tested in different manufacturing organizations to achieve zero-defect through the continuous improvement approach.

Practical implications

The study results aim to achieve zero-defect, help to improve customer satisfaction, reduce waste and rework in the manufacturing process. This framework is also used as a problem-solving approach to implement Six Sigma in the Indian industries.

Originality/value

Zero defect manufacturing is growing in India and globally. This framework helps to implement zero defect manufacturing in Indian industries. It is an essential tool to capture the voice of the customer.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

J. Tracy O'Rourke

A zerodefect quality philosophy must exist throughout any organisation before it can successfully implement computer‐integrated manufacturing (CIM). Once established, zero

Abstract

A zerodefect quality philosophy must exist throughout any organisation before it can successfully implement computer‐integrated manufacturing (CIM). Once established, zerodefect quality pays for itself by mailing a company a stronger, more vigorous competitor.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Deepankar Sinha and Shuvo Roy Chowdhury

Ports are a significant link in a global supply chain and an economic entity that contributes to the country's economy. India has around 200 ports along its coastline of…

Abstract

Purpose

Ports are a significant link in a global supply chain and an economic entity that contributes to the country's economy. India has around 200 ports along its coastline of about 8,000 Km, yet none of them perform at par with many Asian ports. In the Indian port system, cargo throughput and the turnaround time (TAT) of ships calling at ports constitute the most significant performance measures. These performance metrics do not integrate sustainability measures such as emission levels and energy consumed. The draft is a constraint in many ports and ships visit with less than full shipload cargo. The TAT for such vessels may be lower, but the emission per ton of cargo carried is higher compared to a ship with full shipload cargo. Many ports have old or poorly maintained equipment. This state of equipment increases pollution and consumption of energy. In this paper, an attempt has been made to address the issue of undesirable and right outputs simultaneously in an Indian port system. This paper proposes a framework to ensure zero defects in Indian port operations and a port-sustainability-index to measure sustainable services in Indian ports.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used data envelopment analysis (DEA) to show that all private terminals did not perform efficiently and contradicted the notion of Indian policymakers that privatization will lead to an increase in performance levels. A literature review was carried out to identify the dimensions and factors that affect ports' performance. A case study of a major port in India and expert group discussion was done to ascertain the views of stakeholders on deficiencies in the system. The authors complemented this approach with sentiment analysis of opinions expressed by stakeholders over a while, using SentiStrength analysis software (Thelwell, 2010, 2012). The authors used the combined findings to develop the port-sustainability-index (PSI), identify the research question, and develop an ontology of the port system. The authors use the concepts of ontology-design-pattern (ODP) and logistics-service-map (Glöckner et al., 2014; Glöckner and Ludwig, 2016, 2017), opinion mining (Pang and Lee, 2008) and competency questions (Glöckner and Ludwig, 2017) to develop a port system map followed by the identification of critical elements; and the flows (physical and information flow) that gets disrupted due to defects in the system. The ontology led to the identification of competencies and capabilities a port needs to possess. Based on these identification process competency questions were drawn, and the authors identified the plausible defects that port may encounter. The authors suggested the sustainability metrics for monitoring port performance and policy changes based on the competency questions, defects, and mitigation plans.

Findings

The authors introduced four KPIs, namely, port-sustainability-index (PSI), load factor (lx and ly), draft ratio (dr), and turnaround-time ratio (TATR). The authors suggested significant policy changes for Indian ports. These included –(1) Introduction of virtual arrival (VA) policy, reducing randomness in the system by pre-scheduling arrivals and activities. (2) Redefining economic life of equipment and machinery in terms of expenditure, income and desired levels of output. (3) Pricing port charges based on stakeholders’ ability and willingness to pay. The port needs to declare its productivity levels and frame their charges accordingly. (4) The ports need to frame an output-oriented privatization policy where it specifies the growth of the port. (5) Framing vessel pricing policy where a vessel may pay tax for the use of non-clean fuel or a get discount for bringing higher parcel load. (6) Levy lower port charges for the shipper for transporting cargo by rail and barges. (7) Introduce a differential pricing system where port levies lower charges for export cargo compared to import load.

Research limitations/implications

The research work can be extended to develop a simulation model to carry out policy experimentations concerning the improvement of performance and carry out sustainable operations. Alternatively, researchers may develop a multi-criteria optimization model to determine the best course of action, keeping the objective function as minimization of PSI value.

Practical implications

This paper provides the means to the Indian ports to remain competitive, lower emission levels and energy consumption, and optimize emission per ton of cargo handled in the port.

Social implications

Society significantly benefits from this study as it recommends ways to minimize pollution that has a significant impact on human lives. Besides, the measures suggested in the paper will lower the cost of exports and imports, enhancing the real income of consumers.

Originality/value

The area of sustainable port operations has previously been under-researched in the Indian context. Authors contribute to the sustainable port operation literature by suggesting a port-sustainability-index, a framework to assess the defects in port operation and development of a port-ontology for further research in the area of a port system.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Gordon E. Smith

Zero acceptance number plans (c = 0 plans) are sometimes described as the only appropriate method of acceptance sampling in an environment in which zero defects is a…

Abstract

Zero acceptance number plans (c = 0 plans) are sometimes described as the only appropriate method of acceptance sampling in an environment in which zero defects is a meaningful concept. Considers the operating characteristic curves of such plans, and evaluates their effectiveness in the presence of low levels of defects. Suggests a confidence interval approach to establish sample size for c = 0 plans. Refers to alternative approaches.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Michael Fisher

Outlines the concept of poka‐yoke (as developed by Shigeo Shingo) as a quality methodology, and contrasts it with statistical process control. Highlights the inherent…

6701

Abstract

Outlines the concept of poka‐yoke (as developed by Shigeo Shingo) as a quality methodology, and contrasts it with statistical process control. Highlights the inherent simplicity and the breadth of coverage, and the way it can be used to underpin a policy of zero defect manufacturing.

Details

Work Study, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Bin Srinidhi and K.R. Balachandran

The traditional view of quality treats it as an economic good which can be developed by incurring costs. Proponents of total quality management have rejected the…

1573

Abstract

The traditional view of quality treats it as an economic good which can be developed by incurring costs. Proponents of total quality management have rejected the traditional view and stress the complementary nature of cost and quality. Reconciles these two views as different manifestations of the same underlying phenomenon within the same strategic framework. This requires precise definitions of quality concepts such as conformance and performance quality. The organization first examines its current position within this framework. The definitions of quality help sharpen the formulation of strategic objectives and the framework helps in mapping out a policy for moving the firm from the current position to the desired position. In addition, also determines the operating systems of quality management by how quality is defined in the organization. In conjunction with the strategic direction, the operational management procedures facilitate the process of cost management.

Details

International Journal of Quality Science, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8538

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Stanislav Karapetrovic and Walter Willborn

States that quality of university education has recently become a subject of major concern. The job market is getting tighter, and even a degree from a reputable…

1076

Abstract

States that quality of university education has recently become a subject of major concern. The job market is getting tighter, and even a degree from a reputable university does not guarantee employment in the area of the student’s expertise any more. Students, their families, employers and the government want assurance that the students will get “good quality” education. The question is: what does “good quality education” mean? Attempts to answer some of the lingering questions about quality in the university environment. Looks at the products and customers of the university, examines some quality assurance issues, and shows what the authors mean by “zerodefect” students.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2022

Craig Langston

Innovation during project delivery is contested space. The aim in this research is to empirically explore the theory of this contested space and how project implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation during project delivery is contested space. The aim in this research is to empirically explore the theory of this contested space and how project implementation can be optimized by the contractor to deliver better outcomes. It is hypothesized that project innovation has a proportional and measurable relationship to contractor success.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a novel conceptual framework, this research applies a case study methodology to analyse 31 construction projects undertaken by a single Australian middle-tier contractor. Benefits from innovation are not often equitably shared. There are risks and rewards. The project innovation zone is defined as a combination of three key performance indicators – efficacy, efficiency and margin – merged into a single index that most likely shows evidence of “working smarter”.

Findings

Client–contractor project innovation (c2pi) is demonstrated to be strongly correlated with head contractor success (HCS), yielding an r2 value of 71%. Innovative projects mostly show positive change in efficacy, efficiency and margin when comparing “planned” and “actual” outcomes. Across the cases studied, 35% demonstrated likely evidence of innovative delivery and 52% demonstrated evidence of success from the construction contractor's perspective.

Originality/value

These findings verify that, within the studied sample, the pursuit of innovation leads to projects that are likely to also have greater success for the head contractor, evidenced by the mix of five critical success factors: finishing on schedule, making profit, and having less defects, less accidents and higher quality workmanship. These outcomes arguably also apply to sub-contractors, where the head contractor assumes the role of “client”.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

A. Möller

With high growth rates, hybrid technology has attained a strong position in microelectronics. Consequently, industrial aspects are coming to the fore. The target is ‘Just…

Abstract

With high growth rates, hybrid technology has attained a strong position in microelectronics. Consequently, industrial aspects are coming to the fore. The target is ‘Just in Time’ production, which is strongly linked with concepts such as flexible automation, zero defects and zero inventory.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Esmail M.A. Mokheimer, S. Sami and B.S. Yilbas

This paper's aim is to examine flow and heat transfer through vertical channels between parallel plates, which is of prime importance in the design of cooling systems for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to examine flow and heat transfer through vertical channels between parallel plates, which is of prime importance in the design of cooling systems for electronic equipment such as that of finned cold plates in general, plate‐and‐frame heat exchangers, etc.

Design/methodology/approach

Numerical and analytical solutions are presented to investigate the heat transfer enhancement and the pressure drop reduction due to buoyancy effects (for buoyancy‐aided flow) for the developing laminar mixed convection in vertical channel between parallel plates in the vicinity of the critical values of the buoyancy parameter (Gr/Re)crt that are obtained analytically. The numerical solutions are presented for a wide range of the buoyancy parameters Gr/Re that cover both of buoyancy‐opposed and buoyancy‐aided flow situations under each of the isothermal boundary conditions under investigation.

Findings

Buoyancy parameters greater than the critical values result in building‐up the pressure downstream of the entrance such that the vertical channel might act as a thermal diffuser with possible incipient flow reversal. Locations at which the pressure gradient vanishes and the locations at which the pressure‐buildup starts have been numerically obtained and presented for all the investigated cases.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the laminar flow situation.

Practical implications

The results clearly show that for buoyancy‐aided flow, the increase of the buoyancy parameter enhances the heat transfer and reduces the pressure drop across the vertical channel. These findings are very useful for cooling channel or chimney designs.

Originality/value

The study is original and presents new findings, since none of the previous studies reported the conditions for which pressure buildup might take place due to mixed convection in vertical channels between parallel plates.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

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