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1 – 10 of 257
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000001382. When citing the…

1231

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000001382. When citing the article, please cite: Steven H. Appelbaum, Barbara T. Shapiro, (1991), “Pay for Performance: Implementation of Individual and Group Plans”, Journal of Management Development, Vol. 10 Iss: 7, pp. 30 - 40.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02621719410057078. When citing the…

2305

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02621719410057078. When citing the article, please cite: Steven H. Appelbaum, Stephen Ritchie, Barbara T. Shapiro, (1994), “Mentoring Revisited: An Organizational Behaviour Construct”, Journal of Management Development, Vol. 13 Iss: 4, pp. 62 - 72.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Steven H. Appelbaum, Louis Vigneault, Edward Walker and Barbara T. Shapiro

The primary goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of meso ethics from a corporate governance perspective, and the strategic process of integration between…

2531

Abstract

Purpose

The primary goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of meso ethics from a corporate governance perspective, and the strategic process of integration between corporate and individual ethics for the creation of an ethical culture. A secondary aim is to identify the organizational behavior variables that are affected by the ethical congruence between employee ethics and the prevailing corporate ethical climate.

Design/methodology/approach

By first situating organizational ethics within the broader phenomenon of business ethics, the authors then more aptly examine corporate ethics at the upper and lower permeable meso boundaries where a shared ethic is negotiated. This conceptual paper tries to capture through a phenomenological approach how strategic governance level (macro) and individual ethics (micro) interact in a complex and dynamic way at the organizational level (meso).

Findings

Normative literature suggests that organizations require more than ethical safeguards to ensure ethical conduct. For example, ethics training programs are demanded and perceived as effective by employees. Recent empirical studies on “ethical fit” have converged and support the assertion that it is in an organization's best interest to continually look for ethical congruence between their workforce and the ethical climate that they intentionally foster. Furthermore, these studies show that perceived ethical congruence positively affects an individual's affective commitment to an organization, and reduces turnover intent.

Research limitations/implications

There is a general lack of consensus, cohesion and empiricism in the current literature. Few studies deal with meso ethics, which have wide‐ranging implications for current and future research.

Practical implications

Demand for business ethics is on the rise as is its corporate response commonly defined as corporate social responsibility (CSR). Standard responsive measures taken by executives are shown to generally be unsubstantiated or insufficient for ethical conduct to truly take root in an organization.

Originality/value

The scope of the paper, with its phenomenological approach, identifies the complexities of corporate ethics for academics and managers alike, where traditionally fragmented organizational levels are herein understood to be permeable and dynamic. The meso perspective of this study provides a new foundation for the study of corporate ethics. Its phenomenological approach provides a conceptual common ground and facilitates convergence in the field. Moreover, the conceptual framework of this paper can enable practitioners to formulate the appropriate strategic intent and governance strategy for their organization.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Steven H. Appelbaum, Maria Serena and Barbara T. Shapiro

A case study was conducted to identify and to dispel the current stereotypes in the workplace regarding Generation X and Baby Boomers. For the purpose of the study Generation X…

6324

Abstract

A case study was conducted to identify and to dispel the current stereotypes in the workplace regarding Generation X and Baby Boomers. For the purpose of the study Generation X consisted of those born between 1961 and 1981, while Baby Boomers consisted of those born between 1943 and 1960. The purpose of this article was to use a custom designed survey based on the literature as the foundation to test congruence or lack of it, to address six commonly held myths presented by Paul and Townsend (1993). Furthermore it was intended to test empirical research gathered by a literature review of the stereotypes in the workplace, to better understand the profiles and factors that motivate the Baby Boomers and Generation X, in conjunction with the following independent variables: age, productivity, motivation, training, mentoring and job satisfaction. The hypothesis tested suggested that Generation Xers are more productive, more motivated, and easily trainable and exhibit higher job satisfaction levels as compared to Baby Boomers. It is important for or ganizations to recognize the limitations that stereotypes create in the workplace. As was demonstrated by the survey, Baby Boomers and Generation Xers are not dissimilar as employees; they possess more similarities than differences. Organizations need to foster an environment of respect/equity for both groups to create synergies between them to build and maintain a productive workforce.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Steven H. Appelbaum, Frederic Lefrancois, Roberto Tonna and Barbara T. Shapiro

The aim of this paper is to establish what managers need in terms of being acculturated and trained to manage the implications of mergers and acquisitions (M&A) on their

6970

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to establish what managers need in terms of being acculturated and trained to manage the implications of mergers and acquisitions (M&A) on their organizations considering the variables: change, communications, leadership, culture and stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compiles strategies gleaned from academic research literature with particular reference to the most common problems management encounters during M&A implementation and execution.

Findings

The independent variables key for successful M&A implementation and execution are identified: communication, leadership and trust, organizational culture, change and stress. The literature review demonstrates the important roles played by each variable throughout the M&A process.

Originality/value

The paper provides management with insights on how to prepare for M&A and design a sound behavioral approach in order to achieve the expected post M&A gains and opportunities in a timely manner. This is significant in training managers dealing with the M&A.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Steven H. Appelbaum and Barbara T. Shapiro

While some women have emerged as leaders within contemporaryorganizations, they occupy one‐third of managerial and professorialpositions in Canada while composing approximately…

1236

Abstract

While some women have emerged as leaders within contemporary organizations, they occupy one‐third of managerial and professorial positions in Canada while composing approximately one‐half of the workforce. At top managerial levels, they occupy less than 5 per cent of senior positions. Earlier research identified “female deficiencies” as a reason why few women have made it to the top. Other findings have indicated that following a masculine model has both advantages and disadvantages for aspiring women managers. Developmental differences between both sexes has helped to explain some of the problems for leaders and followers. Interactive leadership styles utilized by women have been beneficial in moving both genders towards a solution insofar as this style involves four factors: encouraging participation; sharing power and information; enhancing self‐worth of others and finally, energizing others. The use of an androgynous leadership model has not yielded significant findings but there are common characteristics of successful leaders combining both the masculine and feminine models. Organizations and their top leaders need to expand their definition of effective leadership so that an interactive style can be valued, allowing these organizations to be flexible in surviving within an increasingly competitive and diverse environment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Steven H. Appelbaum, Maria Serena and Barbara T. Shapiro

An extensive literature search was conducted to better understand and to dispel the current stereotypes in the workplace regarding Generation X and Baby Boomers. For the purpose…

3194

Abstract

An extensive literature search was conducted to better understand and to dispel the current stereotypes in the workplace regarding Generation X and Baby Boomers. For the purpose of the article Generation X consisted of those born between 1961 and 1981, while Baby Boomers consisted of those born between 1943 and 1960. The purpose of this article was to use an exhaustive review of eclectic/multidisciplinary literature to address six commonly held myths presented by Paul and Townsend (1993). Furthermore, it was intended to examine empirical research gathered by a literature review of the stereotypes in the workplace, to better understand the profiles and factors that motivate the Baby Boomers and Generation X, in conjunction with the following independent variables: age, productivity, motivation, training, and mentoring and job satisfaction. Selected hypotheses were tested suggesting Generation Xers are more productive, more motivated, easily trainable and exhibit higher job satisfaction levels as compared to Baby Boomers. Results were convergent and divergent in several cases worth noting. It is important for organizations to recognize the limitations that stereotypes create in the workplace. As was demonstrated by the varied research, Baby Boomers and Generation Xers are not dissimilar as employees; they possess more similarities than differences. Organizations need to engineer/design an environment of respect for both groups to create synergies between them to build and maintain a productive workforce.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Steven H. Appelbaum and Barbara T. Shapiro

A survey of over 1,000 companies conducted in 1990 indicated thattwo‐thirds will be giving merit‐only increases in 1991, which was a 60per cent increase over two years ago…

1151

Abstract

A survey of over 1,000 companies conducted in 1990 indicated that two‐thirds will be giving merit‐only increases in 1991, which was a 60 per cent increase over two years ago. However, a current question: Is pay for performance used effectively? This article examines both individual and group incentive plans and explores all key factors utilised in determining the outcome (implementation) of these plans. Furthermore, the structure of an effective pay‐for‐performance plan is outlined in light of the mission, strategy and objectives of the organisation to determine how rigid or entrepreneurial the design can be. It was concluded that pay for performance is fundamental for competitive organisations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Steven H. Appelbaum, Frank Kay and Barbara T. Shapiro

The advantages of using assessment centre methods for employeeappraisal at various organisational levels are described, with adetailed explanation of the background to the method…

634

Abstract

The advantages of using assessment centre methods for employee appraisal at various organisational levels are described, with a detailed explanation of the background to the method. Centres still need further development, and some pointers are given to help in this direction.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Steven H. Appelbaum, Heather Ayre and Barbara T. Shapiro

Examines career management, development and performance as proposed in the career management research by Noe, which was defined for studying individual career management. Reviews…

4513

Abstract

Examines career management, development and performance as proposed in the career management research by Noe, which was defined for studying individual career management. Reviews the organizational career management program and the outcomes of organizational development and performance. Applies the Noe model to measure outcomes and determine if there is a direct relationship between career management programs, performance and development. The study involved three different organizations in the IT sector and HRPs as the respondents. A questionnaire was developed using Burack’s career management audit, and selected measures from various sources for development and performance. The results do not prove that the relationships exist. However, recommendations for future study involve performance as a precursor to career management and development. Recommendations for organizations include a review of career paths, development moves, retirement planning, and a research oriented human resources database.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

1 – 10 of 257