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Book part
Publication date: 15 March 2021

William J. Scarborough, Deborah Fessenden and Ray Sin

Research on gender attitudes has consistently found that younger generations have more gender egalitarian views than older generations. Less attention, however, has been…

Abstract

Research on gender attitudes has consistently found that younger generations have more gender egalitarian views than older generations. Less attention, however, has been directed toward examining whether the generation gap has grown or shrunk over time and whether it differs across dimensions of gender attitudes. Using data from the General Social Survey for years 1977–2018,the authors examine the generational gap in gender attitudes across three components: views toward women in leadership, working mothers, and the gendered division of family labor between public and private spheres. The results show that differences between generations vary significantly across these dimensions. Attitudes have converged over time in support for women’s leadership, yet Baby Boomers espouse slightly higher levels of support than other generations, including the younger Generation Xers and Millennials. In contrast, consistent generation gaps are observed in support for working mothers, where younger generations hold more supportive views than respective older generations. Attitudes toward the gendered division of public/private sphere labor have converged between Millennials, Generation Xers, and Baby Boomers, with only Pre-Baby Boomers holding significantly more traditional views. Collectively, these trends highlight how cultural change through cohort replacement does not uniformly advance gender egalitarian ideologies. Instead, these shifts vary across specific dimensions of gender attitudes.

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Gender and Generations: Continuity and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-033-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

James A. Roberts and Chris Manolis

The purpose of the current study was to compare and contrast various marketing‐ and consumer‐related attitudes and behavior across the baby boomer (those born between…

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12401

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to compare and contrast various marketing‐ and consumer‐related attitudes and behavior across the baby boomer (those born between 1946‐1964) and baby buster (those born between 1965‐1976) generations. Study results suggest that baby busters, compared with baby boomers, are more favorably predisposed toward marketing and advertising. It was also found that the two generations differ in their understanding of the domain of marketing. These findings have important implications for marketing practitioners and academics alike. Possibly the most significant finding of the present study was the generally elevated levels of compulsive buying found across both generations. Using Faber and O’Guinn’s compulsive buying clinical screener, we found that 7 percent of baby boomers and 11 percent of baby busters were classified as compulsive buyers. These are considerably higher than earlier estimates of the incidence of compulsive buying and warrant further investigation.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Monika Rahulan, Olga Troynikov, Chris Watson, Marius Janta and Veit Senner

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the difference in purchase decision behavior of compression sportswear by Baby Boomers and Generation Y.

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4216

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the difference in purchase decision behavior of compression sportswear by Baby Boomers and Generation Y.

Design/methodology/approach

Two methods were used for data collection: a simulation study with 17 Baby Boomers and 23 Generation Y subjects using eye-tracking technology; and a questionnaire from a sample of 82 Baby Boomers and 84 Generation Y consumers.

Findings

Generation Y are more inquisitive and focus greatly on technical information. Baby Boomers are more confident with their choices, taking a shorter time to reach a purchase decision; they are more concerned with aspects that protect the wearer.

Research limitations/implications

Limited demographic information was collected from participants in the simulation study, further research is required in this area.

Practical implications

This study provides important insights into the purchase decision behavior of Baby Boomers and Generation Y for compression sportswear. By providing better understanding of some of the key drivers for purchase decisions it enables marketers to develop more effective marketing plans to engage with these important consumer groups.

Social implications

The focus and findings of this study provide further understanding of the motivations of two significant consumer cohorts. This study provides further momentum to the body of cohort research already available.

Originality/value

This study addresses a gap in literature with reference to the comparison of consumer behavior of generational cohorts when purchasing compression sportswear. Findings can be applied in other areas of sportswear and to other countries.

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Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Steven H. Appelbaum, Maria Serena and Barbara T. Shapiro

An extensive literature search was conducted to better understand and to dispel the current stereotypes in the workplace regarding Generation X and Baby Boomers. For the…

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2898

Abstract

An extensive literature search was conducted to better understand and to dispel the current stereotypes in the workplace regarding Generation X and Baby Boomers. For the purpose of the article Generation X consisted of those born between 1961 and 1981, while Baby Boomers consisted of those born between 1943 and 1960. The purpose of this article was to use an exhaustive review of eclectic/multidisciplinary literature to address six commonly held myths presented by Paul and Townsend (1993). Furthermore, it was intended to examine empirical research gathered by a literature review of the stereotypes in the workplace, to better understand the profiles and factors that motivate the Baby Boomers and Generation X, in conjunction with the following independent variables: age, productivity, motivation, training, and mentoring and job satisfaction. Selected hypotheses were tested suggesting Generation Xers are more productive, more motivated, easily trainable and exhibit higher job satisfaction levels as compared to Baby Boomers. Results were convergent and divergent in several cases worth noting. It is important for organizations to recognize the limitations that stereotypes create in the workplace. As was demonstrated by the varied research, Baby Boomers and Generation Xers are not dissimilar as employees; they possess more similarities than differences. Organizations need to engineer/design an environment of respect for both groups to create synergies between them to build and maintain a productive workforce.

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Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Simon Biggs, Chris Phillipson, Rebecca Leach and Annemarie Money

This paper provides a critical assessment of academic and policy approaches to population ageing with an emphasis on the baby boomer cohort and constructions of late‐life…

Abstract

This paper provides a critical assessment of academic and policy approaches to population ageing with an emphasis on the baby boomer cohort and constructions of late‐life identity. It is suggested that policy towards an ageing population has shifted in focus, away from particular social hazards and towards an attempt to re‐engineer the meaning of legitimate ageing and social participation in later life. Three themes are identified: constructing the baby boomers as a force for social change, a downward drift of the age associated with ‘older people’ and a shift away from defining ageing identities through consumption, back towards work and production. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for future social and public policy.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Eddy S. Ng and Emma Parry

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers…

Abstract

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials) working side-by-side for the first time. However, it is unclear how multiple generations of workers interact with each other and affect the workplace. Although there is extant literature on generational differences, some scholars have argued that the effect sizes are small and the differences are not meaningful. The focal aim of this chapter is to present the current state of literature on generational research. We present the relevant conceptualizations and theoretical frameworks that establish generational research. We then review evidence from existing research studies to establish the areas of differences that may exist among the different generations. In our review, we identify the issues arising from generational differences that are relevant to human resource management (HRM) practices, including new workforce entrants, aging workers, the changing nature of work and organizations, and leadership development. We conclude with several directions for future research on modernizing workplace policies and practices, ensuring sustainability in current employment models, facilitating future empirical research, and integrating the effects of globalization in generational research.

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2007

Bruce Prideaux

Over the next decade the older travel market will experience a generational shift as the pre-war generation is replaced by the baby boomer generation. For destinations…

Abstract

Over the next decade the older travel market will experience a generational shift as the pre-war generation is replaced by the baby boomer generation. For destinations such as Norfolk Island that have built a substantial market segment based on older tourists this generation shift will have significant implications. While changes will be required in the type of products and experiences offered by the Island's tourism industry the increased size of the baby boomer generation offers considerable scope to increase yield. This paper examines these issues and discusses the need to recognise the importance of the baby boomer tourist as a distinct and separate tourism segment. To illustrate the possible impact of generation change the paper proposes a product gap model.

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Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-506-2

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Sarah Gardiner, Debra Grace and Ceridwyn King

The purpose of this paper is to explore congruency between the self-identity of Baby Boomer, Generation X and Generation Y consumers with the generational label and…

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2912

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore congruency between the self-identity of Baby Boomer, Generation X and Generation Y consumers with the generational label and popularised identity of each generational cohort.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a mixed methods approach of focus groups (n=49) followed by an online survey (n=627) of Baby Boomer, Generation X and Generation Y consumers. Focus group data were thematically analysed. Descriptive, ANOVA and factor analysis was conducted on the survey data.

Findings

The results show that most consumers only have a vague association with their generational label and profile and find it easier to characterise generations that are different to their own. Generation self-identity congruency is greater among members of the Baby Boomer cohort compared to the younger generations. Yet, even in the Baby Boomer cohort, generational identity is not homogenous among its members.

Practical implications

The results challenge the explicit use of generational labels and stereotypes in marketing strategy.

Originality/value

Given the immense interest and application of generational cohort segmentation, understanding whether and why consumers identify with cohort labels and profiles is critical. The paper questions the longevity of generational cohort analysis given the limited understanding and relevance of this concept to consumers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Kelly Pledger Weeks, Matthew Weeks and Nicolas Long

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between stereotypes, in-group favoritism, and in-group bolstering effects across generations.

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4819

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between stereotypes, in-group favoritism, and in-group bolstering effects across generations.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the trends found in a qualitative study on generational stereotypes, questions on work ethic, work-life balance, and use of technology were administered to 255 participants identified as Millennials, Generation X, and Baby Boomers. Hypotheses predicted that with a strong stereotype, traditional in-group favoritism will not be found; however, an in-group bolstering effect will emerge. In the absence of a strong stereotype, traditional in-group favoritism is expected.

Findings

Generally, there was a strong stereotype that Baby Boomers are worse at technology than Generation X and Generation X is worse than Millennials. There was also a strong stereotype that Millennials do not do what it takes to get the job done as much as other generations. In the presence of these stereotypes, traditional in-group favoritism was not found, but in-groups bolstered themselves by rating themselves more favorably than other groups rated them. Although these findings did not hold for every item studied, there was moderate support for all three hypotheses.

Practical implications

As employees become aware of their biases, they can collaborate better with employees who are different than they are. Practical recommendations are suggested.

Originality/value

The paper applies theory of in-group favoritism to the perceptions of generational cohorts.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Eunju Suh, Matt Alhaery, Brett Abarbanel and Andrew McKenna

This study aims to examine Millennials and generational differences in online gambling activity by comparing online gambling behavior across four different generations

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1032

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine Millennials and generational differences in online gambling activity by comparing online gambling behavior across four different generations: Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers and Millennials.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprised tracked gambling data at the individual player level provided by an online casino accepting real money wagers in a major US gambling market. Attributes of gambling behavior were examined and compared across different generations using Kruskal–Wallis test and pairwise comparisons.

Findings

Generational differences were observed in 13 of the 16 behavioral variables. Millennials spent the least amount of time on gambling and exhibited the lowest scores on the number of days for slot gambling, trip length and trip frequency among all generations. However, their average table gaming volume per play day was greater than those of other generations.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide a better understanding of the generational differences in online gambling behavior. They also help casino operators and gaming machine manufacturers develop casino games and products that can appeal to different generational groups in the online gambling market.

Originality/value

Despite the on-going industry discussion about Millennials and their potential influence on the online gambling market, there appears to be a paucity of empirical research on the online gambling behavior of the Millennial generation. This study fills that gap in empirical evidence, addressing generational differences in online gambling.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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1 – 10 of over 2000