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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Lori G. Beaman and Cory Steele

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the ways in which the Supreme Court of Canada has shifted away from transcendent/religious to nonreligious…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the ways in which the Supreme Court of Canada has shifted away from transcendent/religious to nonreligious conceptualizations of assisted dying.

Design/methodology/approach

A discourse analysis of a Supreme Court of Canada case on assisted dying and the facta of the 26 associated interveners.

Findings

The research points to a shift away from religious to nonreligious understandings in the way the Court conceptualizes suffering, pain, illness and assisted dying.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of nonreligion as a social phenomenon.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2018

Harold Braswell

This article intervenes in the debate, among US disability rights advocates, about physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Through an ethnographic study, I situate this debate…

Abstract

This article intervenes in the debate, among US disability rights advocates, about physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Through an ethnographic study, I situate this debate in the context of the dominant form of end-of-life care in the US hospice. Based on this analysis, I argue that PAS should be an issue of secondary concern to disability rights advocates, and that their primary concern, at the end-of-life, should be the improvement of US hospice care. By thus “putting the ‘right to die’ in its place,” they can achieve consensus among themselves and leverage this consensus to achieve the most substantial advancement of disability rights.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-208-0

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

DeMond Shondell Miller and Christopher Gonzalez

This paper views the growing popularity of death tourism which directs the confrontation with grief and mortality with the expressed purpose of orchestrating travel that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper views the growing popularity of death tourism which directs the confrontation with grief and mortality with the expressed purpose of orchestrating travel that culminates in assistance to end one's life. The specific aims of this paper are to describe the emerging phenomenon of death tourism and situate it as a form of dark tourism, to present briefly the social and legal aspects of assisted suicide in conjunction within the tourism industry, and to conclude with how the trend of death tourism is potentially spreading to other countries beyond Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

By employing a variety of primary and secondary resources, from death tourism industry documents, legal statutes, and news reports, this study explores the propositions of this article.

Findings

Whereas much of the contemporary research in dark tourism focuses on sights, experiences, and actual memorialization, death tourism tends to comprise a holistic view of the emerging phenomenon by viewing supply and demand management (and promotion), political interpretation and control. The final component of the paper views societal interpretations of death tourism and its potential for market expansion.

Research limitations/implications

There have been several social movements and legislative attempts to curtail the spread of assisted suicide and death tourism; however, the demand for the services has grown to the point where jurisdictions are considering measures to allow this practice. Such an expansion of legalized assisted suicide will allow those seeking the right to die more options for a death within a diversified tourism industry.

Originality/value

Death tourism, within dark tourism, represents an emerging field with few academic resources. This paper works to conceptualize and clarify the unique place death tourism holds within tourism and dark tourism specifically.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Sushant Shivaji Pawar, Pallavi V. Madiwale, Ashitosh Pawar and Ravindra Vithal Adivarekar

Dyeing of silk fabric was studied to increase dye uptake using eco-friendly glycerine based eutectic solvent (GES), which acts as a swelling agent.

Abstract

Purpose

Dyeing of silk fabric was studied to increase dye uptake using eco-friendly glycerine based eutectic solvent (GES), which acts as a swelling agent.

Design/methodology/approach

The swelling behaviour of silk fabric in GES was analyzed using three-dimensional laser scanning microscope. Dyeing parameters such as time, temperature and GES concentration were optimized using design of experiments.

Findings

In total, 5.34 F-value and 0.0014 p-value of ANOVA represent that the model is significant. An optimized GES assisted dyeing was carried out with two different classes of dyes such as Acid Blue 281 and Acid Red 151 and further compared with that of conventional aqueous dyeing method.

Originality/value

At 70°C, silk fabric achieves desired colour strength after 35 min of dyeing (10 min lesser than conventional) using GES assisted dyeing method. % Dye exhaustion of GES assisted dye bath was carried out and found to be very good. Fastness properties such as washing, light and rubbing fastness of conventional and GES assisted dyed silk fabric showed comparable results.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Angelika Reichstein

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether, although the state has a duty to protect prisoners, there should nevertheless be a right for prisoners to decide when and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether, although the state has a duty to protect prisoners, there should nevertheless be a right for prisoners to decide when and how they die.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising a utopian thought experiment, the paper covers a series of interrelated issues: the aims of punishment, the functions of prisons, the rights of prisoners and the responsibilities of the state towards inmates. While the paper takes a European focus, it is of interest to a global audience, as the philosophical ideas raised are universally applicable.

Findings

As the right to die advances in society, so should it advance for prisoners. Once assisted dying has been legalised, it should also be available for dying prisoners.

Originality/value

The question has so far not been analysed in depth. With an ageing prison population, however, it is vital that we start engaging with the problems posed by an ageing and dying prison population.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Book part
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Katharina Heyer

This chapter examines disability rights movement's rejection of a right to physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Supporters of PAS frame the right to enlist a physician's help…

Abstract

This chapter examines disability rights movement's rejection of a right to physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Supporters of PAS frame the right to enlist a physician's help in determining the nature and timing of one's death as a fundamental liberty interest and as a right to privacy. The disability opposition counters this with disparate impact and slippery slope arguments and stories of disability pride as a rhetorical rejection of a right it deems dangerous and discriminatory. In examining this clash of rights talk, this chapter analyzes the legal and political consequences of anti-rights rhetoric by a movement that is grounded in notions of autonomy and self-determination.

Details

Special Issue Social Movements/Legal Possibilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-826-8

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Judith Kennedy and Michael Kennedy

Euthanasia and assisted suicide is about changing the law to enable doctors, under certain circumstances, to intentionally kill patients. For proponents the issues have…

Abstract

Euthanasia and assisted suicide is about changing the law to enable doctors, under certain circumstances, to intentionally kill patients. For proponents the issues have been determining what are “appropriate circumstances” for such activity and gathering up enough political support to win the day on numbers. The community and medical profession have been exposed to years of misinformation about euthanasia, and advocates have become so vocal that contrary positions are now barely heard. Nevertheless, there are enormous adverse implications for all healthcare professionals. Clinical management in the twenty-first century has moved well past scenarios painted to justify killing the patient. The inclusion of killing in the therapeutic armamentarium will cause an inexorable erosion of what is at present an absolute protection for the patient, the doctor, and other healthcare professionals.

Details

Applied Ethics in the Fractured State
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-600-6

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Peter Gilbert

This paper aims to describe the content and import of a conference held in partnership between Staffordshire University and The National Spirituality and Mental Health…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the content and import of a conference held in partnership between Staffordshire University and The National Spirituality and Mental Health Forum on the importance of considering life in the context of human mortality, and the meaning and purpose of our lives. It was one of a series of conferences on the theme of health and multi‐belief systems; other conferences were on mental health and civic regeneration. A fourth conference is planned for 2012 on dementia and beliefs.

Design/methodology/approach

The conference and its format, including case studies is placed within the intense debate concerning the meaning of life in the context of death and what might be beyond “the grave”. With this conversation, and the issue of assisted dying becoming more prevalent, it was felt important to bring into the paper not just philosophical writings but examples from novels and “popular culture” which highlight the intensity of the dialogue.

Findings

Considering the perspectives of a variety of major belief systems assists in relating to and caring for the increasing diversity of older people and their carers when the ultimate challenge of dying is being faced.

Practical implications

As the discourse around assisted dying, belief systems and dignity come more to the fore, staff in health and social care will need time to discuss what are crucial issues for those they serve.

Originality/value

As religion and other belief systems come back into focus, partly through equalities legislation and increased demographic diversity, the Staffordshire University/National Spirituality and Mental Health Forum conference series has been an innovative way of meeting this renewed need.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Dorothy J.N. Kalanzi

The purpose of this paper is to explore attitudes towards euthanasia among Ugandan adults.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore attitudes towards euthanasia among Ugandan adults.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an important study because data were recently collected in 2010. The sample consists of 80 participants above age 18 who responded to an interview schedule exploring attitudes towards euthanasia. A qualitative approach was utilized to analyze the findings.

Findings

Unique to this study is the fact that almost all participants (96 percent) perceived euthanasia as murder. Religious beliefs, hope for recovery, potential for new medical technologies, health care costs, quality of life, and the right to die are some of the themes that influenced attitudes towards euthanasia. Religious and cultural beliefs appear to be the major influential factors for euthanasia attitudes in this study.

Originality/value

Generated information may assist in formulating end of life policies as well as addressing related ethical issues in low income nations. Currently, information on attitudes towards euthanasia in sub‐Sahara African countries is scarce in the literature. The paper's findings may increase knowledge in this area.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 33 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2003

Patrick Hanafin

Law attempts to govern life and death through the appropriation of images which give a fantasy of control over death. The functioning of the thanatopolitical state is…

Abstract

Law attempts to govern life and death through the appropriation of images which give a fantasy of control over death. The functioning of the thanatopolitical state is underpinned by a perceived control over death and its representation. This means of controlling death is challenged when someone wishes to die in an untimely fashion. Death may be timely when the State engages in the officially sanctioned killing of the death penalty but not when the individual assumes such a power to decide. When an individual goes before the law to obtain a right to die, instead of confronting death, legal institutions evade the issue and instead talk about life, and its sacred and inviolable nature. Yet, in the same move, many exceptions to this sacred quality of life are carved out. One can see an example of this phenomenon in the area of Supreme Court decision making on physician-assisted suicide. In Washington v. Glucksberg the applicants had died by the time of the Supreme Court’s decision. Where did they go? Were they ever really there for the law? The Supreme Court decision attempts to recompose the notion of identic wholeness in the face of bodies associated with death and decay. It is, in other words, an attempt to arrest the process of death by composing a narrative which valorises life. The case becomes a narrative about the threat to life or, more precisely, a threat to a particular way of life. In other words, the state’s interest in preserving life becomes the interest in preserving the life of the state. The state must live on. The question then moves from being one of whether the individual applicant in a case concerning physician-assisted suicide should live or die, to one which asks should we the court live or die?

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-209-2

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