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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Elizabeth Koschmann, James L. Abelson, Amy M. Kilbourne, Shawna N. Smith, Kate Fitzgerald and Anna Pasternak

Mood and anxiety disorders affect 20–30 percent of school-age children, contributing to academic failure, substance abuse, and adult psychopathology, with immense social and…

Abstract

Purpose

Mood and anxiety disorders affect 20–30 percent of school-age children, contributing to academic failure, substance abuse, and adult psychopathology, with immense social and economic impact. These disorders are treatable, but only a fraction of students in need have access to evidence-based treatment practices (EBPs). Access could be substantially increased if school professionals were trained to identify students at risk and deliver EBPs in the context of school-based support services. However, current training for school professionals is largely ineffective because it lacks follow-up supported practice, an essential element for producing lasting behavioral change. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this pilot feasibility study, the authors explored whether a coaching-based implementation strategy could be used to integrate common elements of evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) into schools. The strategy incorporated didactic training in CBT for school professionals followed by coaching from an expert during co-facilitation of CBT groups offered to students.

Findings

In total, 17 school professionals in nine high schools with significant cultural and socioe-conomic diversity participated, serving 105 students. School professionals were assessed for changes in confidence in CBT delivery, frequency of generalized use of CBT skills and attitudes about the utility of CBT for the school setting. Students were assessed for symptom improvement. The school professionals showed increased confidence in, utilization of, and attitudes toward CBT. Student participants showed significant reductions in depression and anxiety symptoms pre- to post-group.

Originality/value

These findings support the feasibility and potential impact of a coaching-based implementation strategy for school settings, as well as student symptom improvement associated with receipt of school-delivered CBT.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Rebecca Lengnick-Hall, Karissa Fenwick, Michael S. Hurlburt, Amy Green, Rachel A. Askew and Gregory A. Aarons

Researchers suggest that adaptation should be a planned process, with practitioners actively consulting with program developers or academic partners, but few studies have examined…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers suggest that adaptation should be a planned process, with practitioners actively consulting with program developers or academic partners, but few studies have examined how adaptation unfolds during evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation. The purpose of this paper is to describe real-world adaptation discussions and the conditions under which they occurred during the implementation of a new practice across multiple county child welfare systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This study qualitatively examines 127 meeting notes to understand how implementers and researchers talk about adaptation during the implementation of SafeCare, an EBP aimed at reducing child maltreatment and neglect.

Findings

Several types of adaptation discussions emerged. First, because it appeared difficult to get staff to talk about adaptation in group settings, meeting participants discussed factors that hindered adaptation conversations. Next, they discussed types of adaptations that they made or would like to make. Finally, they discussed adaptation as a normal part of SafeCare implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include data collection by a single research team member and focus on a particular EBP. However, this study provides new insight into how stakeholders naturally discuss adaptation needs, ideas and concerns.

Practical implications

Understanding adaptation discussions can help managers engage frontline staff who are using newly implemented EBPs, identify adaptation needs and solutions, and proactively support individuals who are balancing adaptation and fidelity during implementation.

Originality/value

This study’s unique data captured in vivo interactions that occurred at various time points during the implementation of an EBP rather than drawing upon data collected from more scripted and cross-sectional formats. Multiple child welfare and implementation stakeholders and types of interactions were examined.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Chamila Perera and Chandana Hewege

This study aims to explore how young adults understand the climate change problem. It also explores whether environmental paradigms explain how young adults perceive climate…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how young adults understand the climate change problem. It also explores whether environmental paradigms explain how young adults perceive climate change risks in their everyday green conscious behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This interpretive research draws on in-depth interviews with 20 young Australians (aged between 19-25 years) who engage in green conscious behavior.

Findings

Three thematic categories (“non-local” climate change risk, oscillation between environmental paradigms and anthropocentric environmentalism) emerged from the data. The study finds that “non-local” climate change risk perceptions and environmental paradigms inform green conscious behavior. However, no association between environmental paradigms and climate change risk perceptions is found. The study postulates a skeletal theoretical framework for understanding the green conscious behavior of young adults.

Practical implications

Recommendations are provided on how to sustain young adults’ interest in environmental wellbeing and in promoting green commodities in young consumer markets. Suggestions include creating a clear awareness of climate change with a constructive or positive appeal resolving ‘non-local’ climate change risk perceptions and position green commodities as “pro-actions” or “solutions”, as opposed to “reactions”, when reaching young consumer markets.

Originality/value

A high level of green consciousness among young adults is recorded in recent global surveys. This green conscious young consumer segment, however, appears to be largely ignored by green commodity marketers. This study provides green commodity marketers with necessary insights to explore the opportunities that might arise in this unique market segment.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

John B. Ford, Michael S. LaTour and William J. Lundstrom

Uses an upscale female sample to extend previous research onwomen′s perceptions of their role portrayal in advertising media.Indicates that serious disenchantment with perceived…

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Abstract

Uses an upscale female sample to extend previous research on women′s perceptions of their role portrayal in advertising media. Indicates that serious disenchantment with perceived portrayal of women still exists for this important group of consumers. Measures various attitudinal, company image, and purchase intention responses in addition to salient demographic and role orientation variables. Discusses the implications for advertisers using female models in their advertisements.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Muzammil Hussain and Mohammad Saud Khan

To survive in this competitive era of modern business environment, organizations have to constantly develop, adapt and react to new challenges. Therefore, it is critical for…

Abstract

Purpose

To survive in this competitive era of modern business environment, organizations have to constantly develop, adapt and react to new challenges. Therefore, it is critical for organizations to create a sense of justice and involve their employees in business activities; thereby achieving the organization’s strategic goals. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organizational justice (OJ) on job turnover behavior of employees within the print media sector of Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a quantitative methodology. It uses a sample of 402 employees from the newspaper industry to test hypotheses using regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that perceived distributive justice, procedural justice and informational justice have a negative relationship with turnover intentions of employees (as hypothesized) whereas; interpersonal justice did not result in a significant relationship.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first within a Pakistani context in print media sector, aiming to examine the relationship of OJ (addressing all of its dimensions) and “intentions to leave the organization.”

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Nikita Sharda and Anil Kumar Bhat

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of materialism and brand consciousness in determining the luxury consumption among the young Indian consumers.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of materialism and brand consciousness in determining the luxury consumption among the young Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to measure materialism, brand consciousness, attitude toward luxury brands and purchase intention, pre-established scale items were used to design the self-administered questionnaire. A valid sample of 342 respondents was collected through mall intercepts, in-store intercepts, luxury brands exhibitions and festivals and international airports. The relationship was tested using regression analysis.

Findings

The findings support that the materialism and brand consciousness are positively related to the luxury consumption in India and play an important role in predicting the behavior of the young luxury buyers. The Indian youth is buying expensive luxury brands as symbols of status success and wealth in order to fulfill their materialistic goals. The desire to own and possess the well-known and expensive brand names demonstrates the importance the consumers attach to the social and symbolic value of the luxury brands.

Practical implications

The study reveals that the young Indian luxury buyers choose to buy brands that are most advertised. Creative advertisements enhancing luxury brands’ symbolic and social value can be effective. The study has implications for the international luxury brands, as they are expensive, well known and famous among the global consumers.

Originality/value

The key contribution of the study is the establishment of materialism and brand consciousness as important antecedents in the development of attitude toward luxury brands among the young Indian consumers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

Gregory Jeffers, Rashawn Ray and Tim Hallett

Methodological traditions are like any other social phenomena. They are made by people working together, criticizing one another, and borrowing from other traditions. They are…

Abstract

Methodological traditions are like any other social phenomena. They are made by people working together, criticizing one another, and borrowing from other traditions. They are living social things, not abstract categories in a single system.– Andrew Abbott (2004, p. 15)

Details

New Frontiers in Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-943-5

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

John Ovretveit, Susanne Hempel, Jennifer L. Magnabosco, Brian S. Mittman, Lisa V. Rubenstein and David A. Ganz

– The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence based guidance to researchers and practice personnel about forming and carrying out effective research partnerships.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence based guidance to researchers and practice personnel about forming and carrying out effective research partnerships.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature, interviews and discussions with colleagues in both research and practice roles, and a review of the authors' personal experiences as researchers in partnership research.

Findings

Partnership research is, in some respects, a distinct “approach” to research, but there are many different versions. An analysis of research publications and of their research experience led the authors to develop a framework for planning and assessing the partnership research process, which includes defining expected outcomes for the partners, their roles, and steps in the research process.

Practical implications

This review and analysis provides guidance that may reduce commonly-reported misunderstandings and help to plan more successful partnerships and projects. It also identifies future research which is needed to define more precisely the questions and purposes for which partnership research is most appropriate, and methods and designs for specific types of partnership research.

Originality/value

As more research moves towards increased participation of practitioners and patients in the research process, more precise and differentiated understanding of the different partnership approaches is required, and when each is most suitable. This article describes research approaches that have the potential to reduce “the research-practice gap”. It gives evidence- and experience-based guidance for choosing and establishing a partnership research process, so as to improve partnership relationship-building and more actionable research.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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