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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Megha Bharti, Vivek Suneja and Ajay Kumar Chauhan

This paper conducts a meta-analytic review of literature focused on the salient socio-psychological and personality antecedents of luxury purchase intention. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper conducts a meta-analytic review of literature focused on the salient socio-psychological and personality antecedents of luxury purchase intention. It investigates the role of moderators that can assist an effective market segmentation of the luxury market in both emerging and developed economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The final analysis includes 95 effect sizes from 42 studies conducted in 15 countries, spanning 5 continents, from 2000 to 2020. The review examined moderating role of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, market type (emerging vs developed) and other study characteristics.

Findings

Findings show that socio-psychological antecedents had a more salient role than personality antecedents in driving luxury purchase intention (LPI), across both emerging and developed markets. Normative influence, status consumption and materialism exhibited a stronger influence on LPI in emerging markets than developed markets. Further, stronger effects for normative influence and status consumption on LPI were found in high power distance cultures. The role of seeking uniqueness was more salient and the role of normative influence was less salient in studies with a higher percentage of females. Conspicuous consumption was a stronger driver of LPI for fashion luxury products than other luxury products. The study also proposes distinct definitions of status and conspicuous consumption as there is often theoretical overlap of these constructs in literature.

Research limitations/implications

A meta-analytic review may leave blind-spots due to lack of sufficient number of studies investigating certain theoretically relevant moderators. The authors discuss these gaps, along with study limitations.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no previous study has conducted a meta-analytic review of the antecedents and moderators of LPI. With the extension of luxury demand beyond the developed countries in the West to the “new rich” consumers in the East, it becomes imperative to conduct a meta-analysis for a richer understanding of the drivers of luxury demand across different cultural orientations and market segmentations.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Sameeullah Khan, Asif Iqbal Fazili and Irfan Bashir

This paper aims to theorize counterfeit luxury consumption among millennials from a generational identity perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to theorize counterfeit luxury consumption among millennials from a generational identity perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes and tests a model of counterfeit buying behavior using an online survey of 467 millennial respondents. The study uses multi-item measures from the extant literature and uses the structural equation modeling technique to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings reveal when millennials have a self-defining relationship with their generation, they tend to internalize the generational norm pertaining to counterfeit luxury consumption. Millennials’ counterfeit related values: market mavenism, postmodernism, schadenfreude and public self-consciousness contribute to their generational identity. Moreover, market mavenism, cool consumption and public self-consciousness establish counterfeit luxury consumption as a generational norm.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper suggest that the expertise and influence of market mavens can be used to deter counterfeit consumption. Moreover, luxury brands must communicate a cool image to offset the rebellious image of counterfeits. Further, from a standardization versus adaption standpoint, the generational perspective allows for the standardization of anti-counterfeiting campaigns.

Originality/value

The paper makes a novel contribution to the counterfeiting literature by demonstrating that millennials pursue counterfeit luxury brands when they pledge cognitive allegiance to their generation. The paper, thus, extends the identity perspective of counterfeit luxury consumption to group contexts. The authors also test and validate the role of descriptive norms in group contexts by introducing the construct generational norm to counterfeiting literature.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Christiana Mbang Emmanuel-Stephen and Ayantunji Gbadamosi

Although consumption is a universal phenomenon, it is characterised with considerable degree of diversity in relation to various factors such as culture, age, gender…

Abstract

Purpose

Although consumption is a universal phenomenon, it is characterised with considerable degree of diversity in relation to various factors such as culture, age, gender, ethnicity and many others. Accordingly, more often than not, these factors underpin consumers' reactions to different market offerings including luxury products. While a plethora of scholarship efforts are evident in the extant literature in regards to luxury consumption, there is dearth of studies around how this is linked hedonism and ethnic consumers. Hence, this paper aims to fill a palpable gap in the literature by exploring the UK Black African women's taste for luxury fashion consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is interpretive in nature with the use of 20 in-depth interviews conducted with Black African women through the use of snowballing and purposive sampling methods.

Findings

The study shows that the respondents' motivation for luxury consumption is driven by success and evolutionary motives, belongingness, societal pressures, cultural connection, anthropomorphism, consumer brand relationship and hedonism.

Originality/value

Apart from the theoretical implication of the study, which revolves around extending the discourse of taste in consumption and ethnic consumer behaviour, the paper will be greatly beneficial for marketing practitioners, especially in the area of segmentation, targeting and positioning vis-à-vis the marketing of luxury products.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Tingting Mo

The transgenerational influence of inherited family capital on consumers' luxury consumption has been studied recently in the mature luxury market. However, little…

Abstract

Purpose

The transgenerational influence of inherited family capital on consumers' luxury consumption has been studied recently in the mature luxury market. However, little research explores this topic in the emerging luxury market. In China's Confucian culture, “family face” as part of “family inheritance” has been conceptualized as a factor driving luxury consumption. However, this hypothesis has not been empirically tested. The current research, therefore, seeks to examine the impact of economic and cultural capital on Chinese consumers' luxury consumption within the family inheritance context and the roles that face concern and gender play to reveal the particularities of a specific emerging luxury market.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 324 Chinese consumers was recruited in Shanghai. With the full sample, the author first assessed the effects of economic and educational capital (both personal and family sources) and face concern on luxury consumption using regression analyses. Next, the author conducted the regression analyses again by gender.

Findings

Unlike trends in the mature luxury market, Chinese consumers' educational levels do not drive their luxury consumption, and the transgenerational influence of economic and cultural capital functions as a negative factor. Influenced by the patrilineal tradition, higher levels of luxury consumption to compensate for parents' lower income and educational levels and to enhance family face are found only in the male consumer group, but not in the female group.

Originality/value

This research contributes to expanding the current understanding of emerging luxury markets and how the Confucian tradition influences Chinese consumers' luxury consumption through gender role norms.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Noha M. El-Bassiouny

The purpose of this paper is to take the case of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as a starting point for the analysis of the blend between the notions of halal and luxury

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to take the case of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as a starting point for the analysis of the blend between the notions of halal and luxury in the Arab region because the UAE presents an interesting multicultural yet Islamic blend, which has yet not been investigated. Scholarly calls for the assessment of the relationship between consumption and wellbeing have raised interest in conspicuous consumption research. The global phenomenon of luxury consumption has drawn researcher interest at recent times. Despite consumer affluence in the oil-rich Arabian Gulf, research into this phenomenon at this emerging region to-date is still lacking. As the Arabian Gulf is also particularly Islamic, a significant body of literature has addressed halal purchasing yet had failed to examine the intersections between luxury and halal consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The research takes a qualitative methodological approach utilizing unstructured observation and content analysis of 138 visuals collected from prominent shopping malls in Dubai and Abu-Dhabi during the occasion of the minor Islamic Eid following Ramadan.

Findings

The results show that the UAE consumer culture combines authenticity with modernity portraying highly savvy cosmopolitan consumers sharing the global values of urbanization within the halal parameters.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations relate to the utilization of the qualitative methodological approach; hence, the research findings need to be generalized with caution to relevant contexts. This research should be regarded as a critical starting point in analyzing the syllogisms between the notions of halal and affluence.

Practical implications

The findings are relevant to consumer culture research which looks at the implications of modern consumption within the boundaries of halal. The research presents a critical approach and questioning of the overlaps between halal consumption, responsible consumption and luxury consumption in a unique multicultural and affluent setting which is the UAE.

Social implications

The present paper invites academics and practitioners to introspect into the dimensions of responsible consumption, luxury consumption and halal consumption. It asks the critical metaphorical question of whether halal and luxury consumption are two faces of the same coin.

Originality/value

The research concludes with raising critical questions around the boundaries of luxury consumption from an Islamic perspective, thereby combining elements of religion and cultural approaches to Islamic marketing.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Subhadip Roy, Varsha Jain and Nikita Matta

The purpose of this paper is to empirically validate a model of luxury fashion consumption that integrates the antecedents and consequences of luxury buying in a…

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2672

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically validate a model of luxury fashion consumption that integrates the antecedents and consequences of luxury buying in a developing nation context.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses developed in the conceptual model are tested using survey data collected through mall intercept survey of real consumers (with sample sizes 382 and 544). Factor analysis and structural equation modeling are used to analyze the data.

Findings

Major results suggest a significant impact of consumer’s local/global orientation on the motivations and associations behind the luxury buying. Motivations and associations are found to influence luxury consumption, which in turn is found to have a positive effect on post-purchase thoughts/feelings. Social influence is found to have a moderating impact on the effects of motivations and associations on luxury consumption, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The study is restricted to a developing nation context. However, this is one of the novel attempts to validate a comprehensive model of luxury consumption that could be replicated in other contexts.

Practical implications

The findings provide guidelines for a luxury marketer on the factors to consider and monitor while marketing a luxury fashion brand.

Originality/value

The present study adds a new perspective to the literature on luxury buying behavior with its empirically validated comprehensive model.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Hannah L. Wolf, Sussie C. Morrish and Joanna Fountain

Consumer perceptions and motivation for luxury consumption are extensively investigated in the existing literature, although studies have largely focused on branded…

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1633

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer perceptions and motivation for luxury consumption are extensively investigated in the existing literature, although studies have largely focused on branded products with not much attention given to luxury wine. The wine category is distinctive, and luxury wine consumption is notably different from other luxury products. Over the past 20 years, the luxury segment of the wine industry has experienced steady growth, yet understanding of consumer perceptions and motivation for luxury wine consumption is still underdeveloped. Using self-congruency theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework of the perceptions of, and motivation for, luxury wine consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a scoping review approach, the current literature on luxury wine and luxury branded products is analyzed for existing gaps in understanding luxury wine consumption.

Findings

The conceptualization of luxury wine along with the perceptions, motivators and indicators for wine consumption are currently underdeveloped. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for understanding what drives perceptions and motivators of luxury wine consumption.

Originality/value

Emerging from a scoping review of extant literature, this paper proposes a conceptual framework for understanding consumers’ perceptions of luxury wine and motivations for consumption. This framework will enable a better understanding of the dynamics of luxury wine consumption.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Melika Husic and Muris Cicic

The purpose of the paper is to analyse the luxury market and determine the factors that determine luxury consumption. Luxury consumption has been neglected, and yet many…

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40975

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to analyse the luxury market and determine the factors that determine luxury consumption. Luxury consumption has been neglected, and yet many questions arise concerning the underlying dimensions of luxury shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

Two scales were used: questions concerning luxury consumption were used in order to determine the sample of luxury consumers, and a PRECON scale was used to measure individual differences in consumers’ prestige shopping preferences. After the scale validation process, factor analysis was conducted, along with regression analysis of all PRECON factors.

Findings

The results show that in this market consumers perceive quality as a brand determinant. Further, strong patron status suggests a “snob effect” among respondents, who buy exclusive items in an attempt to distinguish themselves. Hence, rare products indicate respect and prestige among the respondents. Furthermore, this paper defines two sub‐categories, namely “old aristocracy” and “new money”, with the latter more ascendant in the case of a developing market. It also showed that luxury consumers behave similarly worldwide, regardless of economic or social surroundings.

Research limitations/implications

Luxury consumption should be put in the context of psychological determinants, and perhaps tested according to lifestyle.

Originality/value

This paper brings attention to luxury consumption, its motives and consumer styles.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Stephanie Geiger-Oneto and Elizabeth A. Minton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of religion, morality and mindset in influencing perceptions of luxury products.

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1352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of religion, morality and mindset in influencing perceptions of luxury products.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses three experimental studies to investigate this relationship.

Findings

Study 1 shows that religiosity influences negative moral emotions (but not positive moral emotions), which then negatively influence luxury consumption and morality evaluations. Study 2 replicates the effects of Study 1 and shows that priming a moral (marketplace) mindset decreases negative moral emotions and increases luxury consumption evaluations for highly (less) religious consumers. Study 3 explains the effects found in Studies 1 and 2 as driven by moral licensing, such that priming a moral (marketplace) mindset decreases (increases) the negative moral emotions experienced by those primed (not primed) with religiosity. Study 3 also improves the external validity of findings by including a social media sample of regular luxury purchases. Implications for theory and marketing practice are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The present research is limited by samples conducted in Western culture with a predominantly Western, Christian religious audience. Future research should examine how moral vs marketplace mindsets differentially influence the consumption of luxury products for Eastern religious consumers (e.g. Hindus, Buddhists and Confucianists). Additionally, this research was conducted using Allport and Ross’ (1967) religiosity measure. Some could argue that the measure is not the most representative for atheists or agnostics or is outdated, so further research would benefit from replicating and extending the findings in this paper with other, newer religiosity measures better adapted to measure all belief systems.

Practical implications

Marketers of luxury products should realize the potential of a new target audience – religious consumers. While religiosity is positively correlated with negative moral emotions toward luxury products in Study 1, Studies 2 and 3 reveal that priming a moral mindset can reduce negative affect and increase evaluations of luxury products. Thus, marketers could seek out ways to emphasize morality in messaging. For example, a marketer may incorporate words such as virtues, ethics and/or noble, when describing attributes of their brand in advertising, thereby resulting in a moral licensing effect. Research suggests advertising content has the potential to influence consumers’ perceived moral obligation, inclusive of the moral or immoral nature of the consumption of luxury brands.

Originality/value

While the link between religion and luxury goods is evident in popular culture, previous research has yet to empirically explore this relationship. This study fills this gap by investigating the role of religiosity on the perceived morality and ultimately the purchase of luxury branded goods.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Carolin Siepmann, Lisa Carola Holthoff and Pascal Kowalczuk

As luxury goods are losing their importance for demonstrating status, wealth or power to others, individuals are searching for alternative status symbols. Recently…

Abstract

Purpose

As luxury goods are losing their importance for demonstrating status, wealth or power to others, individuals are searching for alternative status symbols. Recently, individuals have increasingly used conspicuous consumption and displays of experiences on social media to obtain affirmation. This study aims to analyze the effects of luxury and nonluxury experiences, as well as traditional luxury goods on status- and nonstatus-related dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

After presenting the theoretical foundation, the authors conduct a study with 599 participants to compare status perceptions elicited by the conspicuous consumption of luxury goods, luxury experiences and nonluxury experiences. The authors investigate whether experiences that are visibly consumed on Instagram are replacing traditional luxury goods as the most important status symbols. Furthermore, the authors examine the effects of the content shown on nonstatus-related dimensions and analyze whether status perceptions differ between female and male social media communicators. Finally, the authors analyze how personal characteristics (self-esteem, self-actualization and materialism) influence the status perceptions of others on social media.

Findings

The results show that luxury goods are still the most important means of displaying status. However, especially for women, luxury experiences are also associated with a high level of social status. Thus, the results imply important gender differences in the perceptions of status- and nonstatus-related dimensions. Furthermore, the findings indicate that, in particular, the individual characteristics of self-actualization and materialism affect status perceptions depending on the posted content.

Originality/value

While the research has already considered some alternative forms of conspicuous consumption, little attention has been given to experiences as status symbols. However, with their growing importance as substitutes for luxury goods and the rise of social media, the desire to conspicuously consume experiences is increasing. The authors address this gap in the literature by focusing on the conspicuous display of luxury and nonluxury experiences on social media.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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