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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Anne Lythgoe and Matthew Baqueriza-Jackson

Since the introduction of the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012, there has been a common misconception that Social Value is inherently about Procurement. We think…

Abstract

Since the introduction of the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012, there has been a common misconception that Social Value is inherently about Procurement. We think that the process of Procurement is a means through which questions can be asked around Social Value commitments; however, Social Value should come into dialogue way before a tender exercise. It must be at the forefront of political visioning, strategy development, officer behaviour and the design of goods and services. In this chapter, we explore how Public Authorities and other Anchor Institutions can embed Social Value into everything they do, utilising Commissioning and Procurement as the basis.

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Sameeullah Khan, Asif Iqbal Fazili and Irfan Bashir

This paper aims to theorize counterfeit luxury consumption among millennials from a generational identity perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to theorize counterfeit luxury consumption among millennials from a generational identity perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes and tests a model of counterfeit buying behavior using an online survey of 467 millennial respondents. The study uses multi-item measures from the extant literature and uses the structural equation modeling technique to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings reveal when millennials have a self-defining relationship with their generation, they tend to internalize the generational norm pertaining to counterfeit luxury consumption. Millennials’ counterfeit related values: market mavenism, postmodernism, schadenfreude and public self-consciousness contribute to their generational identity. Moreover, market mavenism, cool consumption and public self-consciousness establish counterfeit luxury consumption as a generational norm.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper suggest that the expertise and influence of market mavens can be used to deter counterfeit consumption. Moreover, luxury brands must communicate a cool image to offset the rebellious image of counterfeits. Further, from a standardization versus adaption standpoint, the generational perspective allows for the standardization of anti-counterfeiting campaigns.

Originality/value

The paper makes a novel contribution to the counterfeiting literature by demonstrating that millennials pursue counterfeit luxury brands when they pledge cognitive allegiance to their generation. The paper, thus, extends the identity perspective of counterfeit luxury consumption to group contexts. The authors also test and validate the role of descriptive norms in group contexts by introducing the construct generational norm to counterfeiting literature.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Leandro da Silva Nascimento, Júlio César da Costa Júnior, Viviane Santos Salazar and Adriana Fumi Chim-Miki

Coopetition is a well-studied phenomenon in traditional enterprises. However, it lacks deepening in the social sphere, specifically on hybrid organizations (social and…

Abstract

Purpose

Coopetition is a well-studied phenomenon in traditional enterprises. However, it lacks deepening in the social sphere, specifically on hybrid organizations (social and commercial goals). This paper analyzes the configuration of coopetition strategies in social enterprises and how these strategies can improve social value devolution.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a multicase study with Brazilian social enterprises and a social incubator. Semistructured interviews with founders of the social enterprises and the president of the incubator were the primary sources of evidence, supported by observations and secondary data.

Findings

The authors identified four main findings: (1) the social incubator induces coopetition among social enterprises; (2) coopetition is necessary to improve market performance; (3) coopetition is a natural strategy resulting from the activity of the social enterprise; (4) the behavior and context of social enterprises generate a new framework for coopetition formation. This framework comprises three stages of value: a social cooperation level to co-creation of value; second, a social competition level to the appropriation of value; and the third coopetition-balanced level to social value devolution.

Originality/value

The authors advance knowledge on coopetition in an exciting, underexplored context, social entrepreneurship. The authors highlight that the coopetition nature and outcome in social enterprises have specificities compared to traditional businesses. The authors also improve the understanding of social value devolution based on simultaneous cooperation and competition among small social enterprises, allowing theoretical and practical implications. Thus, they advance the recurring discussion in coopetition literature beyond the generation and appropriation of value.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Brandsford Kwame Gidigah, Kofi Agyekum and Bernard K. Baiden

Though the Public Procurement Act of Ghana makes room for specific socio-economic policies (environmental, social, economic and other policies which are intended to…

Abstract

Purpose

Though the Public Procurement Act of Ghana makes room for specific socio-economic policies (environmental, social, economic and other policies which are intended to promote social and economic impact), there is no explicit definition and provision for social value as an evaluation criterion, culminating in the absence of a definition in the Act. This paper elicits the conception and understanding of social value from stakeholders in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative method that relied on a semi-structured interview of 30 participants purposively drawn from Western, Western North and Central regions of Ghana. An inductive thematic analysis approach, which involved identifying repetitions, exploring similarities and differences, noting linguistic connectors, and a framework were employed to analyse the data.

Findings

The study established no single definition or explanation for social value in the construction industry in Ghana. However, it was revealed from the study that the concept of social value could be defined from the functional perspective of the definer, particularly from the perspective of a Procurement Officer, Works Engineer, and a Quantity Surveyor. A new insight from the study that differs from the body of literature is that participants equated benefits derived from physically constructed projects as social value.

Social implications

The study has implication for public administration and practice regarding the decision-making process in the construction industry in Ghana. It provides a vital awakening on social value as a criterion in evaluating construction works procurement in Ghana. The ability of participants to equate the benefits derived from executed construction projects as social value creates a new perspective on understanding the meaning of social value in the procurement of works construction.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the state-of-the-art and ongoing discourse on the concept of social value globally. The findings create an important catalyst for social value research in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Nebojsa S. Davcik, Daniela Langaro, Colin Jevons and Rita Nascimento

This study aims to investigate whether users’ engagement with a social media platform is affected as they engage in non-sponsored brand-related user-generated content…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether users’ engagement with a social media platform is affected as they engage in non-sponsored brand-related user-generated content (UGC). The concept of non-sponsored brand-related UGC encapsulates various social media patterns in which individuals choose how to consume, contribute or create brand-related content with no formal brand incentive or control.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on the question of how users engage with non-sponsored brand-related UGC on Instagram and assesses the influence of UGC perceived value, using partial least squares variance-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

The research shows significant and positive effects of UGC on Instagram users’ intentions to engage with the platform and the influence of UGC perceived value on UGC uses. The findings deepen the understanding of the mechanisms underlying non-sponsored brand-related UGC in consumer engagement marketing, with significant implications for brand managers and the future development of Instagram and other social media platforms.

Originality/value

The UGC functional, social and emotional values are evaluated for their effects on generating the three distinct patterns of consumer online brand-related activities (consumer, contribute and create) in the non-sponsored brand-related UGC context.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Michaela Haase

This paper aims to present a value cocreation framework that furthers understanding of social value cocreation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a value cocreation framework that furthers understanding of social value cocreation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an interdisciplinary conceptual analysis drawing on social enterprise studies, marketing research and philosophical value theory. It applies a visible-hand approach to the study of market relationships and, in line with philosophical research strategies, unfolds its analysis using conceptual distinctions.

Findings

This study provides a framework that substantiates the distinction between two modes of value cocreation and identifies the structure of the social enterprise business model. It explains how social enterprises can be conceived as role models for for-profit organizations, and it elucidates why social value cocreation is a demanding objective.

Research limitations/implications

This paper develops an integrative, nondichotomist view of value cocreation that does not conceptualize social and economic value cocreation as opposing goals.

Practical implications

Social enterprises can use the business model structure and two modes of value cocreation and view themselves as role models for for-profit organizations.

Social implications

This paper applies a visible-hand approach to both for-profit organizations and social enterprises. Using its framework, for-profit organizations can reflect on the consequences of their actions on society and how social value cocreation can improve social enterprise effectiveness.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this paper is the first to bridge service-oriented approaches to marketing and social enterprise studies using philosophical value theory to improve understanding of social value cocreation.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Book part
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Sergio Paternostro

There are still many different theoretical approaches and practical interpretations about what an integrated report is. Starting from this premise, the overall purpose of…

Abstract

There are still many different theoretical approaches and practical interpretations about what an integrated report is. Starting from this premise, the overall purpose of this chapter is to critically analyze the relationship between integrated reporting (IR) and social/sustainability disclosure. Indeed, although some scholars considered IR as a tool to improve the sustainability approach of the companies allowing to disclose more relevant social information, others are more critical about the potentiality of IR to improve social disclosure. Therefore, the general research question is: Is there a natural link between IR and social disclosure (true love) or is the IR a practice to “normalize” the social disclosure and accounting (forced marriage)?

In the attempt to provide a preliminary answer to the research question, the chapter analyzes what is the approach of three categories: (1) academics; (2) soft-regulators; and (3) companies. From the methodological point of view, a mixed method of analysis has been adopted.

From the analysis of the three different points of view, IR can be considered as a “contested concept” because of the heterogeneous and sometimes conflicting interpretations and implementation that are done on this type of report. This leads to relevant theoretical and practical implications.

Details

Non-Financial Disclosure and Integrated Reporting: Practices and Critical Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-964-4

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Richard Reeves-Ellington

Conceptualizing trust alone or as the starting point for understanding both trust and distrust is insufficient. Therefore, this chapter focuses on the construction of…

Abstract

Conceptualizing trust alone or as the starting point for understanding both trust and distrust is insufficient. Therefore, this chapter focuses on the construction of phenotypic trustscapes and distrustscapes that permit an abstract exploration of the concepts of trust and distrust using societal and dyadic relationships and perceptions of the individual as the units of analysis. For theoretical understanding of trust and distrust, it uses social and evolutionary biologic multi-level theory. This chapter builds on the existing trust literature in three ways: (1) by triangulating on trust and distrust through the use of a number of research methodologies; (2) by placing trust and distrust in value orientation theory and models; and (3) by extricating trust and distrust from reciprocity constructs, and placing them into separate phenotypes: trustscapes and distrustscapes. These efforts show that both trust and distrust are naturally occurring phenomena, with one or the other predominant in specific contexts. The chapter includes scenarios in Japan, Bulgaria, and Indonesia to demonstrate how micro- and macro-level examples of trustscapes and distrustscapes function.

Details

Multi-level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-269-6

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Constance Dumalanede, Kavita Hamza and Marielle Payaud

This study aims to highlight the processes that private organisations implement to improve access to health care services for low-income communities in Brazil.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to highlight the processes that private organisations implement to improve access to health care services for low-income communities in Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research based on a comparative case study was conducted in São Paulo. A for-profit organisation and a not-for-profit one were compared to scrutinise how they adapt themselves to the social context they are embedded in; while improving their service accessibility.

Findings

Both kinds of organisations have succeeded to reach their goal of improving the access and reducing the time frame of health care services to low-income populations. Their initial business model (BM) makes them face their own challenges that they face with different strategies. It affects their way of communicating, their organisational culture, the patients’ expectations and their level of inclusiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The research is context-dependent because of the specific conditions of the health public system in Brazil. When shaping health care BMs, the national context must be taken into account and the service marketing components should be used to enhance patients’ value co-creation in the health care service delivery process.

Practical implications

The research gives insights to organisations that seek to adapt their BM to improve health-care access to low-income populations.

Social implications

Health-care access plays a key role in improving populations’ living conditions and reach one of the sustainable development goals of the United Nation.

Originality/value

Health care services access at the bottom of the pyramid remains under-studied. The paper brings value by comparing for-profit and non-profit organisations, which have the same social goal of improving health-care access to low-income populations while developing different practices to deal with their own challenges.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Asha Binu Raj

This paper aims to examine the relationship between employee value proposition (EVP) and employees’ intention to stay and analyse how psychological contract and social

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between employee value proposition (EVP) and employees’ intention to stay and analyse how psychological contract and social identity moderate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in Indian IT sector among a sample of 268 employees using criterion sampling. Data were collected through structured questionnaires which revealed employees’ perceptions of EVP, intention to stay, psychological contract and social identity.

Findings

The empirical results reveal that employees have greater intention to stay when their organisations deliver an EVP including development value, social value and economic value. Findings indicate that psychological contract positively strengthens the impact of EVP on employees’ intention to stay. Also, when employees strongly identify with their organisation’s image, they have higher intention to stay in presence of a strong EVP.

Research limitations/implications

Consistent with the existing literature, the paper contributes an integrative model of EVP based on social exchange process, moderated by social identity and psychological contract. As the study was limited to Indian IT sector, cross-sectional nature of data is a limitation for drawing inferences about the influence or causality in general.

Practical implications

The study provides a new perspective to managers to develop an attractive EVP to gain employees’ increased intention to stay. Employers in IT sector may adopt this comprehensive model to strategise their value propositions.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a validated conceptual framework of EVP and intention to stay, tested for moderation effects by psychological contract and social identity. This moderation model based on social exchange adds value to employer branding literature.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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