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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2021

Gergely Szolnoki, Stylianos Filopoulos, Claudia Stein-Hammer and David Brazsil

The health effects of alcoholic beverages and the differentiation between moderate consumption and alcohol abuse are discussed controversially in medicine, sociology and…

Abstract

Purpose

The health effects of alcoholic beverages and the differentiation between moderate consumption and alcohol abuse are discussed controversially in medicine, sociology and politics. Therefore, this paper aims to analyse how consumers assess the relation among health, wine consumption and alcohol abuse.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative survey in Germany and in Hungary was conducted with 2,000 and 1,500 respondents, respectively. The survey included questions regarding the assessment and definition of alcohol abuse and moderate wine consumption.

Findings

The results show that in Hungary, moderate wine consumption is defined similarly as in Germany; on the contrary, in the case of alcohol abuse, there are significant differences. Regardless of cultural background, the respondents agreed that excessive wine consumption harms health and certain consumer groups (pregnant women or people under 16 years old) should avoid drinking wine.

Practical implications

These findings can contribute to a long-term goal-oriented wine in moderation strategy for consumers and support policy advice on moderate and excessive wine consumption.

Originality/value

The results help to understand how consumers perceive moderate and excessive wine consumption in everyday life, and how they judge wine as an alcoholic beverage. To the best of authors’ knowledge, there has not been similar study published on the perceptions of wine consumers in this regard, neither in Germany nor in Hungary.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

James J. Fogarty

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the literature on alcohol consumption, the externality cost of alcohol consumption, and the effectiveness of policy options.

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2438

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the literature on alcohol consumption, the externality cost of alcohol consumption, and the effectiveness of policy options.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence on the cost to society of alcohol consumption, the amount of excise tax collected, the demand response of consumers, and the effectiveness of alcohol‐control policies is reviewed.

Findings

Alcohol excise taxes generally, but not everywhere, fail to recover the externality costs placed on society that arise from alcohol consumption. Where externality costs are greater than excise revenue higher excise taxes are one effective and appropriate policy response. Complementary policies to higher excise taxes are likely to include: the provision of more information about harmful effects to consumers, especially the young; greater enforcement of drunk‐driving laws and zero tolerance drunk‐driving laws for young drivers. Restrictions on the opening hours of late night venues may have a modest impact on reducing costs, while advertising restrictions are unlikely to be effective.

Originality/value

Typically. articles on alcohol consider a single issue. This review paper brings together information from both the health stream of alcohol studies and the economics stream of alcohol studies and provides a useful survey and synthesis of the literature.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Melissa Evans, Leanne Lester, Richard Midford, Helen Walker Cahill, David Foxcroft, Robyn Waghorne and Lynne Venning

The consequences of problematic alcohol consumption fall heavily on Australian adolescents, with this population at increased risk of death, serious injury and other harm…

Abstract

Purpose

The consequences of problematic alcohol consumption fall heavily on Australian adolescents, with this population at increased risk of death, serious injury and other harm. Research regarding whether gender, socioeconomic status (SES) or locality play a role in young people’s alcohol consumption and related harm is limited in Australia. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether Victorian students’ patterns of alcohol uptake, consumption and related harm differed between gender, SES and locality.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved secondary analysis of student data from the Drug Education in Victorian Schools harm minimisation drug education programme, undertaken in 21 Victorian government schools over three years The initial cohort of 1,752 students was followed during Years 8, 9 and 10, when their average age would have, respectively, been 13, 14 and 15 years.

Findings

There were no gender differences in drinking uptake, consumption or harm. Students with low SES were more likely to have consumed a full drink of alcohol and also experienced more alcohol-related harm. Students living in a regional/rural area were more likely to have engaged in high alcohol consumption.

Originality/value

The findings of this study highlighted that different student demographics have an impact on patterns of alcohol consumption, vulnerability and harm. Students with low SES, living in a regional/rural area, are more at risk than students with higher SES living in a fringe metro/major regional or metro area. Future school harm minimisation drug education programmes should consider the needs of students with demographics that make them more susceptible to higher consumption and harm.

Details

Health Education, vol. 119 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Tatiana Kossova, Elena Kossova and Maria Sheluntcova

The purpose of this paper is to examine macroeconomic factors that are significantly related to consumption of various alcoholic beverages in Russia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine macroeconomic factors that are significantly related to consumption of various alcoholic beverages in Russia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider 78 Russian regions for the period from 2008 to 2012. Data were collected from the Federal State Statistics Service of Russia. The authors investigate differences in the volume and structure of consuming absolute alcohol in aggregate, vodka, beer, and wine. Estimating fixed effect panel models enables us to reveal the relationship between alcohol consumption and the set of macroeconomic factors that include economic development of regions and living standards, the effect of unemployment, and the degree of urbanization.

Findings

Alcohol consumption is procyclical in Russia. Two main alcoholic beverages in Russia are vodka and beer. Economic development and urbanization of regions are positively related to consuming alcohol. Unemployment rate affects consumption of different types of alcoholic drinks in a different way. For absolute alcohol, vodka and beer, this relationship is negative. However, it is positive for wine. The effect of unemployment on absolute alcohol and vodka increases over time. For beer, it is remained unchanged. For wine, this effect weakens over time.

Originality/value

To the authors knowledge, the paper is the first one to analyze macro-level factors of consumption of different alcoholic beverages in Russia. Conclusions made on aggregate macroeconomic data add to understanding of drinking patterns in Russia as a country with the large territory and great regional variations. Findings can be used for correcting the alcohol policy at the national and regional level.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Kagiso Matjila, Leeford Edem Kojo Ameyibor and Yvonne Saini

This paper aims to estimate the effects of three socialization agents in the form of advertising exposure, parental influence and peer influence and effects of personal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to estimate the effects of three socialization agents in the form of advertising exposure, parental influence and peer influence and effects of personal attitude on youth alcohol consumption behaviour in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation model was used to test the proposed conceptual model of four hypotheses based on the validated survey data gathered from 300 youth in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Findings

Empirical results show that advertising, parental influence, peer influence and personal attitude has positive effects on youth alcohol consumption behaviour, with advertising and personal attitude exhibiting statistical significance on alcohol consumption behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The study involves only youthful demographic in the age range of 18–35 and hence suffers from generalizability. The cross-sectional design also limits the findings with respect to time.

Practical implications

It provides policymakers insights into important factors to focus on changing drinking behaviour in South Africa.

Social implications

It also improves the understanding of how consumer socialization agents and personal attitudes affect alcohol consumption of young people in South Africa and help deal with the problem through policy changes and social marketing interventions.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to estimate three socialization agents and personal attitude of youth in alcohol consumption behaviour in an emerging market context.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2017

Dana B. Krieg and Anna K. Krause

This study aims to further investigate the relationship between perceived adherence to gender norms and binge drinking in college students. Thus, researchers examined…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to further investigate the relationship between perceived adherence to gender norms and binge drinking in college students. Thus, researchers examined college students’ perceptions of adherence to masculine and feminine gender norms when gender and alcohol consumption of a vignette character were manipulated.

Methodology/approach

Undergraduate participants (N = 368) were randomly assigned to one of four vignette conditions: female moderate drinker, female binge drinker, male moderate drinker, male binge drinker and then surveyed regarding perceptions of the vignette character.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that there are significant relationships between the vignette character’s alcohol consumption and perceived adherence to feminine gender norms. The character’s gender, as well as the participant’s own alcohol consumption patterns, also related to perceived adherence to feminine gender norms.

Practical implications

College students’ perceptions of binge drinkers are influenced by gender norms, which has important implications for safe consumption of alcohol. When young men (or young women) are encouraged to drink to avoid appearing too feminine, negative consequences may be more likely. In this study, perceptions of the vignette character’s safety were also found to be related to alcohol consumption of the vignette character, as well as the alcohol consumption of the participant, suggesting that a heavy drinker might not show as much concern for another’s heavy consumption.

Details

Discourses on Gender and Sexual Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-197-3

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Hayley L. Cocker, Emma N. Banister and Maria G. Piacentini

Purpose – To extend understanding of the rituals and practices of alcohol consumption through a focus on the consumption object (the Dirty Pint) as a central actant in the…

Abstract

Purpose – To extend understanding of the rituals and practices of alcohol consumption through a focus on the consumption object (the Dirty Pint) as a central actant in the practices of extreme alcohol consumption.

Design/methodology/approach – Seventeen paired and group interviews were conducted with young consumers (aged 16–18). An Actor-Network Theory (ANT)-inspired approach to data analysis was used in conjunction with Bourdieu's key concepts of habitus, field and capital to present a detailed understanding of the practices and rituals of extreme alcohol consumption.

Findings – The same consumption object takes on a very different role and has different forms of agency, depending on the social space (field) in which it is embedded. The Dirty Pint acts differently within different social spaces or sub-fields of the field of adolescence, particularly when combined with individual subjects of differing habitus to produce an object+subject hybrid.

Social implications – Paying attention to all the relevant actants (both human and non-human) involved in the practice of alcohol consumption could lead to more novel and relevant alcohol-harm reduction strategies or campaigns that young people can both relate to and take more seriously.

Originality/value of paper – We stress the need to grant greater agency to objects in studying consumption practices and identity enactment and contribute to the literature on identity by extending Gergen's (2009) ‘relational being’, conceiving of the self as embedded in both inter-subjective and inter-objective interactions and relationships (Latour, 1996).

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Ryan McAndrew, Judy Drennan, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Sharyn Rundle-Thiele

Collective motives for alcohol consumption represent a nascent field, with individual-level attributes, peer pressure and broad-level environmental elements being at the…

Abstract

Purpose

Collective motives for alcohol consumption represent a nascent field, with individual-level attributes, peer pressure and broad-level environmental elements being at the forefront of research. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of friendships in the context of alcohol consumption and determine what group-level motives exist for alcohol consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 participants aged 18–30, these discussed the role the participant’s friendship group played in alcohol consumption and helped to elucidate what collective and group-level motives existed.

Findings

Group-level motives can steer a collective’s alcohol consumption by either endorsing it or degrading it, the findings revealed four group-level motives: these were, competition, conformity, hedonism, with opportunity cost receptiveness acting as a buffer.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample and qualitative nature of the study means external validity still needs to be established to generalize the research to other audiences.

Practical implications

By unpacking group-level motives researchers can develop group-level strategies and match specialized interventions with the right priority group.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to address group-level motives for alcohol consumption and makes an important contribution to understanding how group-level factors can impact individuals.

Details

Health Education, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Bishnu Sharma, Maria Raciti, Rebecca O'Hara, Karin Reinhard and Fiona Davies

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived susceptibility to alcohol retailers' sales promotion strategies and young, female university…

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2250

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived susceptibility to alcohol retailers' sales promotion strategies and young, female university students' intention to buy alcohol and attitude towards alcohol consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a convenience sample of three universities in three OECD countries with high alcohol consumption per capita: Australia (n=305), Germany (n=323) and Wales (n=361). A self‐administered survey approach was used to collect data from female university students between the ages of 18 and 24 years in one university in each country. The four alcohol sales promotion strategies of interest were price reductions, quantity specials whereby the more you buy the less you pay on a pro rata basis, bulk purchasing of alcohol, and purchasing from more than one store to take advantage of low prices.

Findings

The study found that except for retailer price reductions, the association between Welsh university students' intentions to buy alcohol and their susceptibility to the remaining retailers' sales promotions was greater than that of university students in Australia and Germany, respectively. Significant differences between the countries were found in terms of the salience of perceived susceptibility to retail sales promotion strategies and their correlation with students' attitude towards alcohol consumption.

Originality/value

The paper's findings provide insights particularly for upstream, legislative strategic interventions to combat the issue of alcohol drinking of young female university students.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Franco Manuel Sancho, Maria Jose Miguel and Joaquin Aldás

The purpose of this paper is to analyze, within the consumer socialization theory framework, the influence of three socialization agents (parents, peers and advertising as…

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2708

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze, within the consumer socialization theory framework, the influence of three socialization agents (parents, peers and advertising as part of media content) over alcohol consumption intentions among young people, differentiating between underage and overage individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured interviews were performed in both high schools and a university to analyze the hypothesized model.

Findings

The results show that both positive and negative expectancies towards the perceived consequences of consuming alcohol are the main antecedents of consumption intention. Moreover, all three considered agents have either a direct and indirect effect on those expectancies; and advertising plays a more important role on underage audience intentions to consume alcohol.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that consumption intention among adolescents and young adults is affected by parents, peers and advertising. However, each social agent has a differential effect on young people.

Social implications

This research highlights the importance of strict regulation (or even restriction) on alcoholic advertising to reduce the effect on youth.

Originality/value

The paper develops a comprehensive model to explain some (of the many) relationships underlying alcohol consumption among young people.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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