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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Keith Thomas

The purpose of this article is to survey and analyse the characteristics of cask ale beers in the UK.

3343

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to survey and analyse the characteristics of cask ale beers in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Retail sampling and laboratory analysis of 453 beers from 190 breweries allowed beer styles to be defined and described. Analysis of the styles allowed comparisons to be made and trends established.

Findings

A total of 12 distinct beer styles were identified and described. Comparison with the largest selling keg beers indicated that cask beers have a wider variety of character. Cask ales produced by smaller microbreweries did not differ significantly from those produced by more established traditional breweries. Changes were seen in selected beers analysed over a five‐year period.

Research limitations/implications

A wider range of analysed parameters such as malt, hop and yeast derived flavours may provide a more exact view of common features between and, particularly, within styles. A more detailed timed series of analyses would help show how trends in styles change. Beers with unspecified styles could be further analysed.

Practical implications

The data presented could act as a benchmark for style definitions and be relevant to the brewing industry, to consumer groups and to trading standards considerations. Defined styles may assist academic and clinical investigations into how different beers may affect health and disease.

Originality/value

This paper provides a broad and comprehensive overview of UK beers and assesses how contemporary beers have developed in comparison to traditional products. It conducts some novel comparisons and will be of value to the brewing industry, consumer groups, trading standards authorities and to academics.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Douglas W. Murray and Martin A. O'Neill

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underexplored niche market potential of craft beer, especially as it may relate to independent food and beverage operations, as…

13254

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underexplored niche market potential of craft beer, especially as it may relate to independent food and beverage operations, as a means of gaining competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through the distribution of a survey instrument to craft beer and home brewers, designed to assess the demographic profile, purchasing/restaurant selection, and decision behavior of this group and assess the likelihood of their future behavioral intentions toward continued participation in the craft beer segment.

Findings

The paper reveals that craft beer and micro brew pub success has been driven by the home brew movement and continues to gain market share at the expense of broad line food service and macro beer producers. The demographic profile of this group shows age range, income, and educational levels sufficient to drive continued growth. The high satisfaction and likelihood to recommend scores support this assessment.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is limited to members of the Brewers Association, the American Home Brewers Association, and craft beer enthusiasts known to members of the organization. Additionally, the survey was administered electronically limiting participation to people comfortable with this medium.

Practical implications

F&B operators who demonstrate commitment to craft beer through server education, beverage list commitment, and supporting events can achieve market differentiation and dominance within the niche; leading ultimately to competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This research sheds light on underexplored areas of craft beer and the opportunity for independent F&B operators to identify and penetrate an increasingly important niche market, which to date has been viewed primarily from the perspective of microbrew pubs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Keith Thomas and Erik Millstone

Reports results of an examination of the differing extent to whichvarious beers enhance thirst, and therefore possibly encourage repeatedconsumption. Describes a novel…

Abstract

Reports results of an examination of the differing extent to which various beers enhance thirst, and therefore possibly encourage repeated consumption. Describes a novel methodology for estimating the impact of beer consumption on thirst; the resulting evidence shows that some beers make consumers significantly more thirsty than others. Discusses two possible explanatory hypotheses to explain the differential effect on thirst of various beers, i.e. the effect on thirst could be mediated by diuresis; or it could be a direct function of the levels of any of sulphur dioxide, bitterness, ethanol, mannitol, sodium and potassium. Provides evidence to indicate that none of those factors, by themselves, were sufficient to account for the observed differences. Establishes the existence of a significant phenomenon, but its explanation remains to be located.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Ksenija Dumicic´, Sanda Renko and Natasa Renko

This paper considers the structure and performances of the Croatian beer market, as well as consumers’ attitudes and preferences. The results emphasise that the domestic…

2092

Abstract

This paper considers the structure and performances of the Croatian beer market, as well as consumers’ attitudes and preferences. The results emphasise that the domestic brands with their quality and tradition, in spite of the imported beer brands’ influence, are the dominant brands on the Croatian beer market.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Steven J. Jackson and Sarah Gee

Purpose – To explore the contested nature of masculinity through an examination of contemporary promotional culture associated with a predominantly masculine commodity …

Abstract

Purpose – To explore the contested nature of masculinity through an examination of contemporary promotional culture associated with a predominantly masculine commodity – beer. More specifically, the analysis focuses on the representations of masculinity in two New Zealand beer advertisements spanning a 25-year period.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter is divided into four sections: (1) a brief overview of the contemporary crisis of masculinity; (2) the role of the media and promotional culture in representing and reproducing crises of masculinity; (3) The Holy Trinity: Sport, Beer and Masculinity and (4) analysis of two promotional campaigns for New Zealand beer brand Speight's. Here, the original series ad from 1992 is compared and contrasted with the 2019 instalment using Strate's (1992) framework which conceptualizes beer advertisements as ‘manuals of masculinity’, in order to track potential changes over time.

Findings – The results highlight the enduring value of Strate's (1992) framework of beer advertisements as manuals of masculinity. In addition, the results reveal that while the representation of masculinity in Speight's beer advertising has changed over time, key themes related to exclusive male spaces, physical labour and the core value of ‘mateship’ remain.

Research limitations/implications – Within the context of globalization, promotional culture operating at both the global and local level can cultivate images of masculinity that represent and reproduce the existing gender order, but it can also confront and disrupt it.

Details

Sport, Alcohol and Social Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-842-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 February 2022

Margarita Cruz and Nikolaus Beck

The purpose of this paper is to show how authenticity limits businesses' responses to competition in the food and beverage industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how authenticity limits businesses' responses to competition in the food and beverage industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper focuses on a unique dataset of over 300 breweries and more than 1.300 beer drinkers in Franconia (Germany) to test the impact of authenticity on firms' reactions to competition within geographic communities. The paper uses ordinary least squares (OLS) and fractional logit models.

Findings

The findings reveal that breweries tend to enlarge their product portfolio by introducing non-authentic products as a response to competition in geographic communities, while reducing their product diversity and engagement in non-authentic segments when preferences for authenticity prevail in the geographic community. The findings further suggest that in geographic communities where both competition and preferences for authenticity are present, firms tend to keep their product portfolios narrow and withdraw non-authentic products even when product proliferation strategies would be more efficient to deal with competition.

Originality/value

This paper offers novel insights on the impact of authenticity on product proliferation strategies for food and beverage businesses. By showing that expectations on authenticity can constrain firms' product portfolio even in the presence of competition, this paper contributes to contemporary discussions in the fields of strategic management and organization theory about the role of authenticity for food and beverage firms. Unlike previous studies focusing on the benefits of authenticity for firms, the present study is one of the first ones to highlight the negative spillovers of authenticity for firms operating in the food and beverage industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2022

Ekaterina Shakina and Ignazio Cabras

This paper aims to investigate the impact of pubs and breweries’ attributes on beer prices by exploring and examining the variation of beer prices across pubs in York, UK.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of pubs and breweries’ attributes on beer prices by exploring and examining the variation of beer prices across pubs in York, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Data gathered from five surveys of pubs conducted between 2012 and 2020 are used to test six research hypotheses analysing how factors such as location, type of ownership and management of pubs, beers’ characteristics and breweries’ attributes affect beer prices in the on-licence market.

Findings

Beer packaging, type of brewery, pubs’ ownership and management all have a significant impact on beer prices, with beer on average cheaper in premises owned by pub companies and breweries compared to independently owned pubs.

Research limitations/implications

Findings can have implications in the first instance, on current fiscal policies affecting beer prices and, on a broader scale, regulating alcohol consumption.

Practical implications

Understanding beer price mechanisms in the pub sector offers valuable insights to practitioners and policymakers about designing and delivering policies and actions aimed at halting the decline of pubs in the UK.

Social implications

Findings provide original information relevant for developing initiatives aimed at preventing excessive alcohol consumption in private premises, an issue commonly associated with problems such as alcohol-related diseases, loneliness and antisocial behaviour.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first, providing an empirical analysis of beer price mechanisms within the pub sector at such a granular level; findings have important implications for pubs and on-licence businesses and for local communities and economies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Researching Craft Beer: Understanding Production, Community and Culture in An Evolving Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-185-0

Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Des Quinn, Vaughan Ellis and James Richards

Fewer than half of UK start-up businesses survive beyond five years (ONS, 2020). The Scottish Small Business Survey of 2019 found competition in the market and uncertainty…

Abstract

Fewer than half of UK start-up businesses survive beyond five years (ONS, 2020). The Scottish Small Business Survey of 2019 found competition in the market and uncertainty as to how to face it were considered the most significant barrier to success by almost half of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) (Scottish Government, 2020). This chapter considers how four Scottish breweries have formulated start-up strategies to respond to competition in an ever-increasingly crowded marketplace in order to maximise their likelihood of survival. The findings from each of these case studies are presented in an accessible format, and indicate that a variety of approaches to the development of the businesses can be adopted, albeit planned approaches dominate. Drawing on real life experiences of four successful businesses, the practical choices they took provide guidance and inspiration for other aspiring craft beer entrepreneurs in selecting an appropriate approach to and content of their founding strategy.

Details

Researching Craft Beer: Understanding Production, Community and Culture in An Evolving Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-185-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2017

Edwins Laban Moogi Gwako

This longitudinally informed ethnographic work explores the interlocking socioeconomic and cultural roles, changes as well as effects of home-brewed alcoholic beverages in…

Abstract

Purpose

This longitudinally informed ethnographic work explores the interlocking socioeconomic and cultural roles, changes as well as effects of home-brewed alcoholic beverages in Maragoli society of western Kenya. The informants’ emic perspectives enhance existing knowledge and understanding of the commodification of home-brewing of alcohol. The participants’ experientially anchored views provide refined insights into how home-brews are influenced by the disintegration of livelihoods and women brewers’ need to earn money independently from men’s income to meet their financial needs. This work also documents alcohol-related maladaptive aspects including men’s misappropriation of funds, malnutrition, domestic violence, sexual promiscuity, rape, prostitution, and disposal of agricultural inputs and produce to obtain money to buy brews.

Methodology/approach

This study used a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods to enhance data quality, validity, reliability, and deep learning of the dynamics and ramifications of home-brewing of alcoholic products.

Findings

This study’s empirical results show Maragoli brewers’ ingenuity in their risk-aversive efforts to: (1) optimize positive benefits and (2) reduce the unintended maladaptive consequences of home-brews.

Practical implications

This work demonstrates that brewers are not passive victims of their productive resource constraints. They exercise ingenuity in producing and selling alcoholic beverages to earn a living even though this venture generates unintended harmful outcomes. This calls for interventions by governmental arms, nongovernmental organizations, and community-based support networks to empower brewers and their clientele to venture into alternative enterprises and consumption of less harmful refreshments. Safety-nets should also be in place to minimize vulnerability and social fragmentation attributable to home-brewed alcohol.

Details

Anthropological Considerations of Production, Exchange, Vending and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-194-2

Keywords

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