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1 – 10 of over 159000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Liang Song and Joel C Tuoriniemi

The purpose of this paper is to examine how firms’ accounting quality affects bank loan contracting in seven emerging markets and whether these relationships are affected…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how firms’ accounting quality affects bank loan contracting in seven emerging markets and whether these relationships are affected by borrowers’ governance standards.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample period is 1999-2007 because the syndicated loan market was severely affected by the East Asian financial crisis of 1998 and the US financial crisis of 2008. The final sample includes 719 loan observations for 75 firms in seven emerging markets.

Findings

The authors find that syndicated lenders provide loans with more favorable terms such as larger amounts, longer maturity and lower interest spread to borrowers in emerging markets with higher accounting quality. The authors also find that the influences of accounting quality on syndicated loan contracting for borrowers in emerging markets exist only with higher country- and firm-level governance rankings. The results of this paper suggest that lenders place more value on accounting numbers generated by borrowers in emerging markets with stronger internal and country governance frameworks.

Originality/value

Overall, this research provides new insights about how accounting quality affects the contract design. Specifically, the extant literature has demonstrated the effects of accounting quality on financial contracts in developed countries (e.g. Bharath et al., 2008). The authors extend this analysis to borrowers in emerging markets and confirm a similar result. Most notably, the authors explore whether the relationship between accounting quality and syndicated loan contracts is influenced by borrowers’ country- and firm-level governance, and find that accounting quality matters only when accompanied by high-quality governance. This research provides new insights about how accounting quality and governance standards affect the terms of borrowing contracts in emerging markets.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Kim Watty

To provide a view of quality in accounting education from the perspective of a critical stakeholder group – academic accountants. The identification of this view adds to…

5251

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a view of quality in accounting education from the perspective of a critical stakeholder group – academic accountants. The identification of this view adds to the growing discussions around quality, and how it is assured in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a framework for defining quality in higher education to an accounting context, a postal survey questionnaire was sent to academic accountants at 39 Australian universities to gather data about their views of quality in accounting education.

Findings

Academic accountants view quality, as currently defined and promoted in their immediate working environment, differently to their views about how quality should be defined and promoted. As a consequence, quality assurance and improvement systems may be currently designed to assure quality that is promoted in accounting education, rather than quality that ought to be promoted.

Research limitations/implications

Using a postal survey to gather data on the complex issue of “quality” might not always provide the richness of data that may be collected during face‐to‐face survey interviews.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide valuable input into the discussion around the design of quality assurance and improvement systems in higher education generally, and for accounting education specifically.

Originality/value

In the absence of any previous empirical research that has sought to identify these perceptions, the findings fill the gap in the literature by clearly identifying the views of quality in accounting education from a key stakeholder group – academic accountants.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Masumi Nakashima

This study focuses on a survey of chief financial officers (CFOs) in public firms in Japan concerning the following six points: the importance of the definition earnings…

Abstract

This study focuses on a survey of chief financial officers (CFOs) in public firms in Japan concerning the following six points: the importance of the definition earnings quality; higher quality earnings; the determinants of earnings quality; prevalence, magnitude, and motivation of earnings management; accounting that influences earnings quality; and misrepresenting of earnings. The results are following: first, Japanese CFOs define earnings quality as earnings accurately reflecting economic reality, earnings accurately reflecting the results of operations, and earnings backed by cash flows, earnings sustainability, recurring, and consistent, and earnings reflecting long-term trend importance. Second, Japanese firms consider earnings that reflect consistent reporting choices over time as higher quality. They do not consider that earnings having accruals that are eventually realized as cash flow as higher earnings quality. Third, Japanese CFOs indicate that 30% of earnings quality is impacted by firm characteristics such as firm’s business model, industry, and macroeconomic conditions. Surprisingly, the influence of the board of directors is greater than the impact of their internal controls. Fourth, as for the determinants of earnings quality, CFOs consider that more than 70% of Japanese CFOs do not allow the discretion and that accounting standards limit their ability to report higher earning quality. Fifth, Japanese CFOs consider that higher earnings are influenced by accounting principles such as policies that match expenses with revenues and policies that rely on fair value accounting as much as possible. Sixth, CFOs themselves predict that 50% of Japanese firms use discretions and that they use 20% of earnings per share (EPS). Since there is inside and outside pressure to hit earnings benchmarks, Japanese firms possess the motivation to use earnings to misrepresent economic performance, Japanese managers see a red flag when generally accepted accounting principle’s earnings do not correlate with cash flow from operations.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-370-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 November 2012

Irene Nalukenge, Stephen K. Nkundabanyanga and Venancio Tauringana

Purpose – The overall purpose of this study is to investigate whether literacy levels and external user-pressure by the Uganda Revenue Authority affect the perceived…

Abstract

Purpose – The overall purpose of this study is to investigate whether literacy levels and external user-pressure by the Uganda Revenue Authority affect the perceived quality of accounting information of Ugandan SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach – A postal questionnaire survey of 98 SMEs drawn from Kampala, Uganda was undertaken. Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression was used to determine whether literacy levels and external user-pressure affect the quality of accounting information controlling for firm size, accounting qualification and firm age.

Findings – The findings suggest that literacy levels and external user-pressure influence the perceived quality of accounting information. Accounting qualification and firm age were also found to be positively associated with the quality of accounting information. However, there is no significant relationship between firm size and quality of accounting information.

Originality/value – The study provides evidence of the effect of literacy and external user-pressure on the quality of accounting information in a developing country where such evidence does not currently exist.

Implications – Since accounting information is important for economic growth, the Ugandan government needs to spend more resources to improve the literacy especially among the SMEs. The Uganda Revenue Authority also needs to maintain pressure on SMEs to improve the quality of information provided by SMEs since such information is important for assessing tax payable.

Details

Accounting in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-223-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Mohammad Nurunnabi

The study aims at reviewing a synthesis of disclosure, transparency, and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) implementation in an attempt to provide…

Abstract

The study aims at reviewing a synthesis of disclosure, transparency, and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) implementation in an attempt to provide directions for future research. Prior research overwhelmingly supports that the IFRS adoption or effective implementation of IFRS will enhance high-quality financial reporting, transparency, enhance the country’s investment environment, and foreign direct investment (FDI) (Dayanandan, Donker, Ivanof, & Karahan, 2016; Gláserová, 2013; Muniandy & Ali, 2012). However, some researchers provide conflicting evidence that developing countries implementing IFRS are probably not going to encounter higher FDI inflows (Gheorghe, 2009; Lasmin, 2012). It has also been argued that the IFRS adoption decreases the management earnings in countries with high levels of financial disclosure. In general, the study indicates that the adoption of IFRS has improved the financial reporting quality. The common law countries have strong rules to protect investors, strict legal enforcement, and high levels of transparency of financial information. From the extensive structured review of literature using the Scopus database tool, the study reviewed 105 articles, and in particular, the topic-related 94 articles were analysed. All 94 articles were retrieved from a range of 59 journals. Most of the articles (77 of 94) were published 2010–2018. The top five journals based on the citations are Journal of Accounting Research (187 citations), Abacus (125 citations), European Accounting Review (107 citations), Journal of Accounting and Economics (78 citations), and Accounting and Business Research (66 citations). The most-cited authors are Daske, Hail, Leuz, and Verdi (2013); Daske and Gebhardt (2006); and Brüggemann, Hitz, and Sellhorn (2013). Surprisingly, 65 of 94 articles did not utilise the theory. In particular, four theories have been used frequently: agency theory (15), economic theory (5), signalling theory (2), and accounting theory (2). The study calls for future research on the theoretical implications and policy-related research on disclosure and transparency which may inform the local and international standard setters.

Details

International Financial Reporting Standards Implementation: A Global Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-440-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Dennis M. Lopez, Michael A. Schuldt and Jose G. Vega

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between auditor industry specialization and accounting quality in the European Union (EU).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between auditor industry specialization and accounting quality in the European Union (EU).

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a difference-in-differences design and explores audit quality from different industry specialist perspectives and different accounting standard regimes. Specifically, this study examines accounting quality among audits performed by non-industry specialists, EU member country-level industry specialists (EUM-level), EU community-level industry specialists (EUC-level), as well as joint industry specialists.

Findings

This study finds evidence of an improvement in accounting quality among audits performed by non-industry specialists post-IFRS. There is also evidence of an improvement in accounting quality among audits performed by EUC-level industry specialists post-IFRS. In addition, accounting quality among audits performed by EUM-level industry specialists seems to be greater than that of audits performed by non-industry specialists in either the pre-IFRS period or the post-IFRS period. Overall, the mandatory adoption of IFRS in the EU appears to be associated with an improvement in accounting quality among some auditor groups.

Research limitations/implications

Industry specialization and accounting quality are not directly observable constructs; this study inevitably employs proxy measures for both. The findings of this study are location-specific and apply to mandatory IFRS adopters only.

Practical implications

This study informs regulators with respect to the importance of industry specialist auditors and financial reporting quality, particularly within the context of the EU. The findings suggest that industry specialists were a significant accounting quality determinant during the mandatory adoption of IFRS. The findings have implications for regulators in the EU and beyond.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to investigate the impact of auditor specialization on accounting quality in the EU, particularly in connection with the adoption of IFRS.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 December 2021

T.G. Saji

The mandatory adoption/convergence of IFRS has increased the information quality of reported earnings in equity markets across the globe. The purpose of the study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The mandatory adoption/convergence of IFRS has increased the information quality of reported earnings in equity markets across the globe. The purpose of the study is to explore whether the mandatory convergence of Indian Accounting Standards (Ind AS) with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) affect the financial reporting quality of listed firms in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample includes 355 non-financial publicly listed firms on National Stock Exchange (NSE) of India with 1,065 firm-year observations. The authors use models similar to Jones (1991), and DeFond and Jiambalvo (1994) to investigate value relevance in the period “1st January 2017 to 31st December 2019”. The study uses the quantile regression (QR) analysis to verify our hypothesis.

Findings

The findings suggest that IFRS convergence process adds value to accounting quality of reported earnings in Indian stock market. The authors' QR estimations produce collaborating evidence on the uneven impact of IFRS across quantiles and the financial reporting quality skewed in favour of investors of high-valued firms.

Research limitations/implications

The effects of convergence with IFRS in value relevance of financial statements could be reinforced by considering alternate accrual models and incorporating more accounting measures on an expanded sample of stocks from several global markets.

Practical implications

Presently, convergence of local accounting standards to IFRS in India is only partial. The findings may produce useful insights for regulators and standard setters to further increase the value relevance of financial reports whilst they move towards full convergence.

Originality/value

The study explores the information quality of reported earnings of Indian listed firms in post-IFRS convergence period, which is not properly investigated in the literature. Moreover, the research is unique in terms of applying QR estimations to examine the value relevance of IFRS-converged financial reporting from the emerging market perspective.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Krismiaji, Y. Anni Aryani and Djoko Suhardjanto

The purpose of this paper is to discuss empirical research examining the impact of International Financial Reporting Standard (IFRS) adoption and board governance on the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss empirical research examining the impact of International Financial Reporting Standard (IFRS) adoption and board governance on the accounting quality, in terms of relevance and faithful representation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a sample of 454 observations of publicly listed companies on the Indonesian Stock Exchange for the fiscal year that ends on December 31, 2008 through 2011. Relevance is measured by predictive value, whereas faithful representation is measured by absolute discretionary accrual as an inverse measure. Board governance is measured by the board of commissioner score whereas IFRS adoption is measured by the percentage of IFRS adopted. The data used in this study are obtained both from Indonesian Capital Market Directory, Indonesian Stock Exchange database, and from company annual reports.

Findings

This research found evidence of a positive association of IFRS adoption on the relevance of accounting information quality. With respect to faithful representation, this study proves a positive association after IFRS adoption. This research also found that board governance has a positive impact on accounting information quality after IFRS adoption both in relevance and faithful representation. This result is in line with investor’s expectations that fair value IFRS adoption enhances the relevance of accounting information.

Originality/value

This study provides further evidence on the effect of IFRS adoption and board of governance on accounting information quality using data from Indonesia. Moreover, this study measures and tests both dimensions of earnings quality which are relevance and faithful representation and portrays a complete story about the quality of earnings. This study uses the qualitative characteristics of accounting information as proxies for accounting quality, so that it enriches the accounting literature about the role of accounting standards in financial reporting quality.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Ibrahim El-Sayed Ebaid

This study aims to examine whether the adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) leads to accounting quality improvements in Egypt as a code-law…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether the adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) leads to accounting quality improvements in Egypt as a code-law country. In particular, the study examines earnings management, the construct often used to assess accounting quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The study compares earnings management practice for Egyptian listed companies before (2000-2006) and after (2007-2009) the adoption of IFRS.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal that accounting quality, as measured by earnings management, has decreased in post-adoption period compared to pre-adoption period. IFRS are set up to provide high-quality financial reporting. However, this cannot be achieved solely by a regulatory requirement to follow. The accounting system is a complementary component of the country’s overall institutional system. Institutional improvements did not simultaneously take place by the Egyptian government around the adoption of IFRS. The Egyptian government did not introduce a more effective enforcement system, mandatory corporate governance regulations, investor protection mechanisms and sufficient institutional knowledge of IFRS during that period. Thus, even if IFRS are higher quality standards, the institutional features of Egyptian market could eliminate any improvement in accounting quality arising from adopting IFRS.

Research/limitations/implications

The results of the study are consistent with prior research suggesting that the adoption of IFRS, which are generally perceived to be of higher quality than domestic standards, does not necessarily lead to higher accounting quality in code-law countries like Egypt. The overall results indicate that incentives dominate accounting standards in determining accounting quality in Egypt.

Originality/value

The main reason why countries adopt IFRS invariably is to improve accounting quality. It is, therefore, of interest to ascertain if this goal has been met, especially, in code-law countries such as Egypt.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Jun Hao, Minghe Sun and Jennifer Yin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between regional institution and accounting quality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between regional institution and accounting quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates whether and to what extent the convergence to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) improves Chinese firms’ accounting quality. It also examines the role regional institutions play in this process. The focus is on two aspects of accounting quality: the accrual aggressiveness and the timely loss recognition. Specifically, the study tests: whether the convergence to IFRS significantly lowers the accrual aggressiveness proxied by the magnitude of discretionary accruals (DA); whether the convergence to IFRS significantly enhances the timely loss recognition proxied by the likelihood of reporting large negative net income; and whether the effects of convergence to IFRS on accounting quality vary with the quality of regional institutions.

Findings

The findings show that convergence to IFRS generally was accompanied by increases in DA and decreases in timely loss recognition for Chinese firms. Further analysis on the development of regional institutions reveals that both changes in accrual aggressiveness and timely loss recognition are more pronounced for firms located in regions with a lower level of development in the legal environment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the accounting literature in several ways. First, it extends the accounting literature regarding institutional factors by examining the association between regional institutions and accounting quality. Second, by adopting a within-country setting, the study avoids such problems of cross-country comparisons as confounding factors caused by country-specific accounting rules and regulations, differences in infrastructure and culture, and other potential endogeneity problems (Chan et al., 2010). Third, the attention paid to the European and US application of IFRS overshadows the application and effects of IFRS in emerging markets. By examining China, the world largest emerging economy in the process of economic transition, this study sheds light on the effect of convergence to IFRS on accounting quality for emerging or transitional economies.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

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