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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Ying-Yi Deng and Yi-Chun Yang

Few studies have explored how to foster green customer citizenship behavior. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the factors influencing green customer…

Abstract

Purpose

Few studies have explored how to foster green customer citizenship behavior. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the factors influencing green customer citizenship behavior in a restaurant context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a conceptual model, based on previous studies, hypothesizing that green attributes transparency engenders green brand image and green trust, which together facilitate green customer citizenship behavior. The authors used structural equations modeling with data collected from 312 consumers in Taiwan to do the analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that green attributes transparency plays a strong role in determining green brand image and green trust, which enhance green customer citizenship behavior. Managerial implications to aid businesses in developing strategies to enhance their ability to foster green citizenship behavior among its consumers for competitive advantage is also provided, together with an outline of the limitations of the study.

Originality/value

This study used the concept of stimulus–organism–response to test the stimuli of green attributes transparency to enhance customer citizenship behavior mediated by green brand image and green trust. This study makes two theoretical contributions. First, this study extended the concept of attributes transparency, brand image, trust and customer citizenship behavior to a green context. The authors developed a research framework and confirmed that green attributes transparency facilitate green brand image and green trust, which contribute to green customer citizenship behavior. Second, there is no prior study exploring the relationship between green attributes transparency, green brand image, green trust and green customer citizenship behavior. The empirical support for the model developed in this study is based on empirical data of Taiwan restaurant consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Jiangang Du, Danhui Li, Yuxuan Zhao and Mengya Yang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of transparency on consumers' judgment and decision-making.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of transparency on consumers' judgment and decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an experimental research design in which participants' negative emotions dynamically change driven by group emotional interactions when they are experiencing a group complaint.

Findings

The experimental results show that compared with opaque products, transparent products make consumers rely more on emotions to make judgments and decisions (Experiment 1). It is precise because transparency increases the influence of emotion on consumers' judgment and decision-making that positive emotion makes consumers' evaluation and willingness to pay higher, while negative emotion makes consumers' evaluation and willingness to pay lower (Experiments 2 and 3). Transparency will also affect consumers' subsequent judgment and decision-making methods, so they are more inclined to choose the option with the dominant emotional dimension (Experiment 4).

Originality/value

Previous studies mainly focus on the impact of transparent packaging on consumers and discuss the impact of transparent packaging on consumer product evaluation and consumption quantity. This study proves that product-related transparent elements can also affect consumers' decision-making methods, making them more dependent on emotions to make decisions, enriching the research on the influencing factors of consumer decision-making methods.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Adriana Pigeard Muratore and Leonardo Marques

Fashion brands are under heavy criticism for often exhibiting poor working conditions and producing environmental damage. Pressure comes from initiatives such as Fashion…

Abstract

Purpose

Fashion brands are under heavy criticism for often exhibiting poor working conditions and producing environmental damage. Pressure comes from initiatives such as Fashion Transparency Index (FTI) by Fashion Revolution to assess fashion brands' transparency based on information publicly disclosed. But an understanding of how such movements reflect in a Global South country characterised by institutional voids is still absent.

Design/methodology/approach

While the FTI ranks individual brands, in this study the authors have analysed 305 documents extracted from the websites of 20 Brazilian fashion brands to unpack practices and re-bundle them according to three archetypes – opaque, translucent and transparent – that display a maturity curve.

Findings

The authors show that advancement is heterogeneous, and we complement previous research exposing the limits of an NGO in driving transparency by investigating a context embedded in institutional voids. The authors show that most fashion brands restrict transparency to tier-1 suppliers. Moreover, although fashion brands increasingly demand disclosure from their suppliers, they do not clarify their own purchasing practices such as cancellation and payment policies. On the positive note, the authors show that maturity for transparent brands can include the actionability concept by engaging with consumer via surveys and educative content.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to theory by offering a maturity curve of fashion supply chain transparency. The authors contribute to practice by offering the three archetypes – opaque, translucent and transparent. This study unveils heterogeneity and asymmetry between the levels of transparency that buying firms demand from their suppliers against what they provide about their own practices.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Marijn Janssen, Ricardo Matheus, Justin Longo and Vishanth Weerakkody

Many governments are working toward a vision of government-wide transformation that strives to achieve an open, transparent and accountable government while providing…

Abstract

Purpose

Many governments are working toward a vision of government-wide transformation that strives to achieve an open, transparent and accountable government while providing responsive services. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the concept of transparency-by-design to advance open government.

Design/methodology/approach

The opening of data, the deployment of tools and instruments to engage the public, collaboration among public organizations and between governments and the public are important drivers for open government. The authors review transparency-by-design concepts.

Findings

To successfully achieve open government, fundamental changes in practice and new research on governments as open systems are needed. In particular, the creation of “transparency-by-design” is a key aspect in which transparency is a key system development requirement, and the systems ensure that data are disclosed to the public for creating transparency.

Research limitations/implications

Although transparency-by-design is an intuitive concept, more research is needed in what constitutes information and communication technology-mediated transparency and how it can be realized.

Practical implications

Governments should embrace transparency-by-design to open more data sets and come closer to achieving open government.

Originality/value

Transparency-by-design is a new concept that has not given any attention yet in the literature.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Nitish Singh

– The purpose of this study is to understand “Why Should Companies Embrace Cost Transparency”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand “Why Should Companies Embrace Cost Transparency”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a thought piece in response to the paper by Simintiras et al. (2015), “Should Consumer’s Request Cost Transparency?”

Findings

Arguments based on past research and company practices show that companies practicing cost transparency can increase their customer following, brand loyalty, differentiation and ultimately the profits.

Practical implications

The paper showcases examples of how companies have implemented cost transparency to differentiate their customer offerings. The paper also shows that conscious consumers are now demanding more cost transparency, and companies have already started to heed this call.

Originality/value

The paper specifically outlines arguments and recent examples to show why companies should embrace cost transparency.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Baah Aye Kusi

This study aims to examine the effect of private (PRST) and public (PUST) sector-led financial sector transparencies on bank interest margins (BIM) termed as social cost…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of private (PRST) and public (PUST) sector-led financial sector transparencies on bank interest margins (BIM) termed as social cost of financial intermediation in different institutional quality setups.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a two-step dynamic generalized method of moments panel data and bootstrapped quantile models with 91 economies between 2004 and 2016. Data is sourced from World Development Indicator and Global Development Finance databases.

Findings

The results show that under strong and weak political and financial regulatory institutional setups, the reducing effect of PRST on BIM are observed and reported while the full sample reports no significant nexus between PRST and PUST on BIM. Furthermore, under political institutional quality sample, economies with strong corruption control and regulatory quality are able to reinforce the dampening effect of PRST on BIM while under the same political institutional quality sample, economies with weak rule of law are able to heighten the reducing effect of PRST on BIM. Moreover, under financial regulator institutional quality sample, economies with strong overall weighted and unweighted, chief executive officer and policy dependent central banks are able to intensify the diminishing effect of PRST on BIM while under the same financial regulator institutional quality sample, economies with weak limits on lending are able to amplify the reducing effect of PRST on BIM. However, PUST is reported to propel lower levels BIM in the bootstrap models, especially in strong institutional economies.

Practical implications

These findings imply that policymakers may rely on PRST to reduce BIM, especially under financial regulatory institutional quality. Additionally, economies must be careful on their reliance on PRST because the effectiveness of PRST to tame high BIM is dependent on the strength of political and financial regulatory institutions.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study presents first time international evidence on the effect of private and public sector-led financial transparency on BIM in strong and weak political and financial regulatory institution economies.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Hafiez Sofyani, Suryo Pratolo and Zakiah Saleh

This study aims to examine the determinants of accountability and transparency of Indonesian village government(s), namely, the competence and organisational commitment of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the determinants of accountability and transparency of Indonesian village government(s), namely, the competence and organisational commitment of village government staff, and the consequences of accountability and transparency for village community trust.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted in village governments in the province of the Special Region of Yogyakarta, covering four regencies: Sleman, Bantul, Kulon Progo and Gunung Kidul. A total of 128 village governments participated in this research. Data were collected by distributing a questionnaire survey, and a partial least squares technique was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The study revealed that village government staff's competence and organisational commitment are positively associated with accountability. However, organisational commitment and accountability are not associated with transparency. In addition, it was discovered that transparency is positively associated with village community trust but accountability is not.

Originality

By testing the determinants and consequences of accountability and transparency following the ratification of the new village law regulating village government governance, this study is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, pioneering research.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Birgit Schenk, Mateusz Dolata, Christiane Schwabe and Gerhard Schwabe

By increasing the digitalization of commercial services citizens' expect more from public services. First of all, this study will strive to identify which problems…

Abstract

Purpose

By increasing the digitalization of commercial services citizens' expect more from public services. First of all, this study will strive to identify which problems citizens encounter when they use a complex public service: preparation of an application for a building permit. In the light of the popularity of omnichannel approaches, the study then explores how omni-channel could help to address the problems which have been identified.

Design/methodology/approach

We implement the first phases of an action design science research project. We collect data both from citizens and public agencies and frame them as transparency problems. These abstract problems are then addressed by an omnichannel service provision as an abstract solution. The abstract solution is then instantiated in a design in the form of a user scenario developed in collaboration with current and future public officials.

Findings

The analysis uncovers multiple transparency issues: it distinguishes between process, case, language, cross-channel and cost transparency. One root cause of the transparency issues observed is the lack of service transparency which defines the purpose and scope of a ser-vice. We therefore recommend defining a service-strategy before informational and technical aspects of an omnichannel approach can be implemented. Following this strategy, omnichannel offers public administrations unique opportunities to excel in citizens' service provision.

Originality/value

The study provides insights into how citizens view complex public services. For researchers, this study offers the conceptualization as transparency issues. Practitioners from the public administrations can also benefit from the concept and vision of omnichannel public services.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Sofia Garcia-Torres, Marta Rey-Garcia, Josune Sáenz and Stefan Seuring

The relationship between sustainability, traceability and transparency in the fashion-apparel industry, characterised by complex, labour-intensive and geographically…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between sustainability, traceability and transparency in the fashion-apparel industry, characterised by complex, labour-intensive and geographically dispersed supply chains (SCs), needs further clarification. The first goal of this study is to revise, refine and adapt to the scope of this industry, the conceptualisation of traceability and transparency and their interrelations with sustainability. The second goal is to uncover the key elements responsible for fostering and hindering their relationship in the fashion-apparel practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi study with fourteen experts representing key stakeholders in the entire fashion-apparel SC was carried out.

Findings

Operational definitions for and clear boundaries amongst sustainability, traceability and transparency are identified, and a relational model including stakeholder groups and roles, drivers and barriers is developed. Traceability, defined as an ability, together with transparency, conceptualised as an internal decision and assisted (inter alia) by cross-sector collaboration are found to be necessary but not sufficient conditions to achieve SC sustainability, which is conceived as an outcome.

Originality/value

The work adapts concepts from the sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) literature to the particular fashion-apparel context, incorporating the practical vision and nuances of all the key stakeholder groups and highlighting the mutually reinforcing relationship among traceability, transparency and cross-sector collaboration for effective SSCM in the fashion-apparel industry.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Muhammad Naveed, Maya F. Farah and Muhammad Junaid Shahid Hasni

Based on transformative service research (TSR), the study explores the mechanisms by which a firm's information transparency influences a retail investor's perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on transformative service research (TSR), the study explores the mechanisms by which a firm's information transparency influences a retail investor's perceived financial well-being (PFW). It proposes a model exploring the mediating roles of the investor's financial risk tolerance (RT) and financial self-efficacy (FSE) in the relationship between a firm's information transparency and the consumer's PFW.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted by including a sample of 310 retail investors from Pakistan Stock Exchange (PSX) to test the proposed hypotheses. Data analysis was based on a series of multiple regressions, moderation and serial mediation analyses.

Findings

The findings show that a firm's information transparency harnesses investors' PFW. Information transparency also positively affects investors' RT toward the firm and their FSE while dealing with financial challenges.

Research limitations/implications

The findings call for a deeper understanding of financial services' interventions and their underlying mechanisms to improve consumer’s financial well-being (FWB). On a methodology level, future studies could apply a mixed-method approach and SEM to explore new avenues for predicting investors' FWB.

Practical implications

Besides validating TSR, the study has several implications for listed firms to adopt more transparent information reporting practices to improve investors' PFW. Accordingly, regulators should take initiatives to compel firms to comply with higher standards of information transparency.

Originality/value

The proposed model explores a concrete mechanism that helps listed firms to strengthen investors' PFW via information transparency.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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