Search results

1 – 10 of over 22000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Mark Hepworth and Geoff Walton

This chapter gives a general overview of the book, indicates the rich diversity of information literacy (IL) and information behaviour (IB) work carried out and is…

Abstract

This chapter gives a general overview of the book, indicates the rich diversity of information literacy (IL) and information behaviour (IB) work carried out and is organised into four broad areas moving from the strategic to the highly contextualised. The four areas are specifically: strategic view; delivering information literacy education; the link between university and work; beyond higher education. The approach for each chapter is summarised. This chapter also examines the inter-related nature of the concepts of information literacy and information behaviour. It shows how these ideas are contextualised, theorised and researched. The authors argue that far from being conflicting approaches to the same problem of information capability, they are, in fact, complementary. Though these are epistemologically different both have much to offer in terms of explanation and also as tools for fostering information capability. The history of information literacy and information behaviour is overviewed and their inter-relation explored. It is argued that information literacy can be viewed as the practitioners’ model for delivering information capability whilst information behaviour, being more research focussed, explains it. A diagram is presented at the end of the chapter which helps to highlight and summarise the distinctions and similarities between IB and IL research.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Muhammad S. Tahir, Abdullahi D. Ahmed and Daniel W. Richards

This study aims to test a moderated mediation model for a twofold purpose. First, to examine the mediating role of financial capability (FC) in the association between…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test a moderated mediation model for a twofold purpose. First, to examine the mediating role of financial capability (FC) in the association between financial literacy (FL) and financial well-being (FW). Second, to analyze if non-impulsive future-oriented behavior (NIB) moderates the associations of FL with FC and FL with FW.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the PROCESS macros in IBM SPSS Statistics to test the moderated mediation model and analyze the 2016 wave of the Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey.

Findings

The empirical analysis shows that FC partially mediates the association between FL and FW. Furthermore, the moderated mediation analysis shows that NIB strengthens the associations of FL with FC and FL with FW. Specifically, the positive associations of FL with FC and FL with FW significantly increase for those consumers who score high on NIB.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the financial services industry. Professional financial planners can positively improve the ability of consumers to deal with their financial matters by highlighting the importance of FL and NIB.

Social implications

The study findings suggest educating consumers to discourage impulsive behavior and encourage them to create financial plans as it will enhance their ability to conduct financial tasks efficiently, improving their FW.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to assess a moderated mediation model, which examines the role of FC as a mediator variable and NIB as a moderator variable in the association between FL and FW.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Yating Li, Chi Zhou, Di Wu and Min Chen

Advances in information technology now permit the recording of massive and diverse process data, thereby making data-driven evaluations possible. This study discusses…

Abstract

Purpose

Advances in information technology now permit the recording of massive and diverse process data, thereby making data-driven evaluations possible. This study discusses whether teachers’ information literacy can be evaluated based on their online information behaviors on online learning and teaching platforms (OLTPs).

Design/methodology/approach

First, to evaluate teachers’ information literacy, the process data were combined from teachers on OLTP to describe nine third-level indicators from the richness, diversity, usefulness and timeliness analysis dimensions. Second, propensity score matching (PSM) and difference tests were used to analyze the differences between the performance groups with reduced selection bias. Third, to effectively predict the information literacy score of each teacher, four sets of input variables were used for prediction using supervised learning models.

Findings

The results show that the high-performance group performs better than the low-performance group in 6 indicators. In addition, information-based teaching and behavioral research data can best reflect the level of information literacy. In the future, greater in-depth explorations are needed with richer online information behavioral data and a more effective evaluation model to increase evaluation accuracy.

Originality/value

The evaluation based on online information behaviors has concrete application scenarios, positively correlated results and prediction interpretability. Therefore, information literacy evaluations based on behaviors have great potential and favorable prospects.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Ratna Candra Sari, P.L. Rika Fatimah, Sariyatul Ilyana and Hardika Dwi Hermawan

This study aims to examine financial socialization based on augmented reality (AR) technology for elementary school students, which it is hoped will improve their sharia…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine financial socialization based on augmented reality (AR) technology for elementary school students, which it is hoped will improve their sharia financial knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The experimental method with pre- and post-test and control groups was used to test the improvement in the young learners’ sharia financial knowledge. This study used AR for sharia financial socialization on elementary school students and focused on sharia’s basic concepts, which include earning money, balanced spending, borrowing, saving, investment, payment methods, financial technology and the concept of protection.

Findings

This study finds empirical evidence that the treatment group, who received sharia financial socialization via the AR media, increased their sharia financial knowledge to a greater extent than the control group did.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides encouraging evidence about the potential of sharia financial education for elementary school students using the appropriate learning strategies and media. The weakness in this study is that it was only carried out in one elementary school, with the children of middle- to upper-income parents. Further research should be undertaken at several schools with the children of parents with different income levels.

Practical implications

A shift in learning styles from verbal or visual to virtual encourages the use of AR-based learning media. Financial concepts can be abstract ones, and AR-based learning media is able to present intangible virtual elements so they become more concrete and tangible.

Social implications

The global COVID-19 pandemic has affected all aspects. One of the most severe and likely to be multiyear ahead is the financial aspect. Therefore, this research is expected to be a preparation for the younger generation as early as possible to strengthen social benefits in order to improve sharia financial literacy.

Originality/value

Research into the financial literacy, especially sharia financial literacy aimed at elementary school students, is still very limited. The teaching of financial literacy will be more effective if educators use the appropriate strategies and media. This study used financial socialization strategies and AR learning media that are aligned with the learning styles of young learners.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Hamid Yeganeh

Building on the “Great Divide” thesis (Goody, 1977; Ong, 1982), this study analyzes the conceptual relationships between the two main communication modes (orality/literacy

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the “Great Divide” thesis (Goody, 1977; Ong, 1982), this study analyzes the conceptual relationships between the two main communication modes (orality/literacy) and cultural values.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a purely conceptual approach to connect orality and literacy with nine cultural dimensions adopted from Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck’s (1961), Hall’s (1976) and Inglehart’s (1997) frameworks.

Findings

The analyses suggest that orality is associated with values such as high-context communication, poly-chronic time, public space proxemics, collectivism, hierarchical social structure, subjugation, past orientation, religiousness/traditionalism and survival cultural dimensions. Literacy is associated with opposing values, including low-context communication, mono-chronic time, private space proxemics, individualism, egalitarian social structure, dominance, future orientation, secularity/rationality, and self-expression cultural dimensions. The paper relies on modernization theory to explain the socio-economic implications and organizes the nine pairs of cultural dimensions according to the great divide between orality and literacy.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this study conceptualizes orality and literacy, analyzes their salient differences and examines their relationships with cultural values. While many studies have tried to explain the differences in cultural values from an economic perspective, this study offers an alternative view of cultural values’ variations across the world.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Meagan Lacy and Alexandra Hamlett

In most higher education institutions, information literacy (IL) instruction is usually considered the purview of librarians, not disciplinary faculty. However, a small…

Abstract

Purpose

In most higher education institutions, information literacy (IL) instruction is usually considered the purview of librarians, not disciplinary faculty. However, a small but growing body of research indicates that students learn the research process best when these skills are taught in the context of a course or a discipline. For this reason, teaching faculty should share ownership of IL instruction — but how? In this case study, community college librarians explain how they successfully trained faculty to integrate IL into their English Composition courses and teach IL independently.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multimethods approach, the investigators draw on faculty interviews, student surveys, and content analysis of student essays to evaluate the impact of faculty-led IL instruction on student learning after one semester.

Findings

Faculty reported that their instruction of IL was improved, and students work better as a result of their collaboration with the librarians. Compared to previous semesters, faculty perceived gains in terms of students’ ability to synthesize and cite evidence in their writing. Student survey results indicate perceived gains in their IL skills, but an assessment of their written work reveals a discrepancy between this perception and the actual application of these skills.

Research limitations/implications

Because there is no control group, no conclusions can be drawn as to whether faculty-led IL instruction is as effective as librarian-led IL instruction or whether students’ academic performance improves due to faculty teaching IL. However, the purpose of this study is primarily descriptive. It addresses how other libraries may create a culture of shared ownership of IL instruction on their campuses.

Practical implications

This study offers an alternative model to library instruction and suggests ways instruction librarians can prioritize their outreach and instructional efforts to maximize impact on student learning.

Originality/value

While much has been written about how librarians can improve IL instruction, few studies mention the role of faculty. This case study starts the conversation.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Raed Khamis Alharbi, Sofri Bin Yahya and Salina Kassim

This study aims to examine the relationship between religiosity and branding on small- and medium-scale enterprises (SMEs’) performance in Saudi Arabia. It also examines…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between religiosity and branding on small- and medium-scale enterprises (SMEs’) performance in Saudi Arabia. It also examines the mediating role of financial literacy on the relationship among Islamic religiosity, branding and SMEs’ performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts the purposive sampling technique in three major commercial cities, namely, Riyadh, Jeddah and Al-Qassim to sample 100 SMEs each, resulting in a total sampling of 300 SMEs in Saudi Arabia. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze the hypotheses formulated in this study. The structural equation modeling is aided with the help of Smart-PLS software.

Findings

This study finds that Islamic branding (on customer, compliance and origin) significantly affect financial attitude, while Islamic religiosity affects financial awareness among the SMEs. Findings reveal that there is a mediating role of financial awareness on the relationship between Islamic branding and Islamic religiosity with the SMEs’ performance. No mediation effect was recorded for financial attitude and financial knowledge. Further investigation reveals that financial attitude, financial awareness, Islamic branding (compliance and origin) and Islamic religiosity were the most significant determinants of SMEs’ performance in the context of Saudi Arabia.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted on SMEs in Saudi Arabia only. Further studies are required to examine SMEs in other Islamic countries and regions to improve the explanatory power of financial literacy on Islamic religiosity and Islamic branding for improved SMEs performance.

Originality/value

This study establishes that Islamic religiosity and branding could further increase the predictive power of financial literacy on SMEs’ performance. This study concludes that efforts to improve financial literacy should be religion-based as well as culture-based depending on where the SMEs are located so that specific strategies can be implemented, to enable the conducive growth of the SMEs and maximize the contribution of the SMEs to economic growth.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Gbadebo Oyeniran Oyelekan

The ultimate aim of \ill\ mass literacy campaigns by the FederalGovernment \ill\ Nigeria in September 1982 was to eradicate illiteracyin Nigeria by the year 2000…

Abstract

The ultimate aim of \ill\ mass literacy campaigns by the Federal Government \ill\ Nigeria in September 1982 was to eradicate illiteracy in Nigeria by the year 2000. Subsequently, several agencies such as the National Commission for Mass Literacy, Adult and Non‐formal Education; Agency for Mass Literacy, etc. were established to achieve this objective. But the library has not been considered as an important agent for promoting mass literacy campaigns. Discusses the roles of the library in the promotion of literacy and suggested strategies to adopt for using the library for mass literacy campaigns in Nigeria.

Details

New Library World, vol. 94 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Maryam Derakhshan and Diljit Singh

The purpose of this paper is to focus on academics' point of view towards integration of information literacy into the curriculum.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on academics' point of view towards integration of information literacy into the curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

This meta‐synthesis analyzed 48 journal articles that examined issues related to integration information literacy into the curriculum. Using the Stevick‐Colaizzi‐Keen method, a meta‐synthesis of seven studies was conducted.

Findings

This process revealed four themes that outline issues related to the academics perspective: collaboration; information literacy pedagogy; information literacy skills; and knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

As this is a literature review, one limitation is lack of literature on perceptions towards information literacy. The issue will be examined further with a wider population.

Practical implications

These results suggest that more knowledge is needed to integrate information literacy into the curriculum to prepare information literate students who can effectively learn information literacy skills and research strategies to be lifelong learners.

Originality/value

The paper explores academics' perceptions towards information literacy and shows the importance of their perceptions as a key step towards embedding its successful adoption.

Details

Library Review, vol. 60 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Aparna Mitra and Pooja Singh

The purpose of the paper is to highlight the differences in literacy and schooling attainment among the scheduled tribe women in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to highlight the differences in literacy and schooling attainment among the scheduled tribe women in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses data from the Census of India, Department of Education in India, and National Human Development Report prepared by the Government of India.

Findings

The high status of women among the tribal groups in the northeastern states has important effects on the literacy rates, enrollment ratios and dropout rates of girls in that region. High‐poverty rates pose to be significant obstacles in attaining literacy and education among tribal women in India. However, large differences in literacy rates in the various states in India show that social and cultural norms, proximity to the mainstream Hindu culture, and the role of women are also important determinants in achieving literacy among tribal women.

Originality/value

Literacy is considered to be an important tool for improving the status of women among the scheduled tribes. Aggregate statistics often paint a dismal picture of the low‐literacy rates and schooling among the scheduled tribe women. This paper shows that such statistics fail to capture the different trends in literacy rates and value placed in schooling among the various tribal groups in India. Differences in economic, social, and cultural backgrounds among the various tribes need to be emphasized in order to understand the differential nature of investments in literacy rates and schooling among tribal women in India.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 22000