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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Giovanna Gianesini and Antonella Brighi

In this study, we aimed at examining the unique and interactive effects of peer violence in cyberspace on adolescents’ emotion regulation and socioemotional adjustment, as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, we aimed at examining the unique and interactive effects of peer violence in cyberspace on adolescents’ emotion regulation and socioemotional adjustment, as well as the mediational role of resilience in the link between adolescent’s pathogenic relational experiences and behavioral outcomes. Specifically, we intended to explore emotion differentiation and regulation in reaction to bullying perpetration and victimization and in terms of positive (proud, confident, good) and negative (ashamed, excited, guilty), Passive (sad, embarrassed, humiliated) and Reactive (angry, scared) emotions and how it impacted and predicted positive and negative outcomes.

Methodology/approach

A stratified convenient sample of 494 Italian students aged 13–19 years (M = 15.27, SD = 1.23) was selected to represent all different school types in Italy and the students were administered a self-report questionnaire on school bullying involvement. General Linear Models, ANOVA, and T-tests were employed to explore gender differences, the relationships between variables, and their contribution to the predictive model. A two-step Cluster analysis was used to profile adolescents based on patterns of resilience, health outcomes, and cyberbullying involvement.

Findings

Results showed significant gender differences, with females using internet and Facebook more than males and being more resilient, positive, and prosocial, but also responding to victimization with higher levels of alienation, anger, humiliation, and psychosomatic and emotional symptoms. Males perpetrated peer violence more than females, were less likely to be victimized, and were generally less emotionally impacted by it. Victimization rates (63.7%, n = 296) were higher than perpetration rates (51.7%, n = 233) and bully-victimization was prevalent (47.1%). Victims prevalently experienced passive emotions (sadness, humiliation, embarrassment) while perpetrators experienced negative ones (guilt and shame). Cluster analysis evidenced different pathways and trajectories of resilience and cyberbullying involvement: Resilient victims (RV), Healthy uninvolved (HU), Healthy Bullies (HB), Alienated Bully-Victims (ABV), and Resilient Bully-Victims (RBV). RV, HU, and HB resulted all well-adjusted, despite the different involvement in cyberbullying, and also RBV and despite the double involvement in cyberbullying, ABV were the only maladjusted and at-risk group in our sample characterized by very low Positivity, very low Resilience, and extremely high Alienation.

Research implications

This study proposes a comprehensive, developmental, ecological, relational, and self-regulatory resilience approach to cyberbullying, which represents an innovative and advanced contribution to the literature with significant implication for research and practice. Fully understanding and measuring the emotional impact of cyber peer violence and resilience following cyberbullying victimization and perpetration can help in developing targeted interventions for both victims and bullies. This study highlighted the need for a self-regulatory model of resilience for modulating emotions, arousal, and behaviors across contexts, relationships, and difficulties. It also evidenced that moderate levels of resilience and positivity are sufficient to buffer youth from involvement in cyberbullying and to predict healthy adjustment and less pathological outcomes.

Originality/value

By profiling adolescents based on resilience levels, health outcomes, and cyberbullying involvement, we evidenced five distinct trajectories of risk evaluation for cyberbullying beyond participating roles. Our results confirmed the fundamental importance of assessing resilience and emotion regulatory resources together with peer violence involvement in identifying and targeting adolescents at risk.

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2024

Mohammad A. Algarni, Murad Ali and Imran Ali

Previous research suggests the crucial role of parents in developing social behaviors of their children. However, less evidence is available on the role of parents in shaping…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research suggests the crucial role of parents in developing social behaviors of their children. However, less evidence is available on the role of parents in shaping responsible financial management behavior among children for their later life. This study bridges this gap by investigating the role of financial parenting in improving well-being among young Saudi people. Particularly, this study examines the role of financial parenting, childhood financial socialization and childhood financial experiences in developing responsible financial self-efficacy and financial coping behaviors to determine financial well-being among young adults in Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a two-step mixed-method approach comprising analyses of symmetric (net effects) and asymmetric (combinatory effects) modelling to test the proposed model. A symmetrical analysis examines the role of financial parenting factors that are sufficient for improving financial well-being among Saudis. An asymmetrical analysis is used to explore that a set of combinations of financial parenting conditions lead to high performance of financial well-being. Data have been collected from 350 students enrolled in undergraduate and postgraduate programs in Saudi Arabia.

Findings

According to asymmetric modeling (i.e. fsQCA) analysis, parents and practitioners can combine financial parenting, childhood financial socialization and childhood financial experiences along with financial self-efficacy and financial coping behaviors in a way that satisfied the conditions (i.e. causal antecedent conditions) leading to high financial well-being. Importantly, the condition of high financial well-being is not mirror opposite of causal antecedent conditions of low financial well-being.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the current knowledge by applying both symmetrical and asymmetrical modelling to indicate a high level of financial well-being. Besides, there is sparse empirical evidence available in the context of Saudi Arabia on how financial parenting, socialization and financial experiences in childhood improve children's financial well-being in their later life.

Practical implications

According to asymmetric modeling (i.e. fsQCA) analysis, parents and practitioners can combine financial parenting, childhood financial socialization and childhood financial experiences along with financial self-efficacy and financial coping behaviors in a way that satisfied the conditions (i.e. causal antecedent conditions) leading to high financial well-being. Importantly, the condition of high financial well-being is not mirror opposite of causal antecedent conditions of low financial well-being. The parents and practitioners must be cautious to regulate the condition in which the combination of the antecedents is not in line with the causal recipes of financial well-being negation.

Originality/value

This study deepens the current knowledge by employing both symmetrical and asymmetrical analysis for testing structural and configurational models indicating the high performance of financial well-being . The study proposes and tests an integrated model to bring new contributions to prior literature. This study also attempts to propose valuable research directions for future researchers interested in the topic.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Lynn Metcalf, Jeffrey S. Hess, Jeffrey E. Danes and Jay Singh

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a web‐based virtual ideation tool, dialogr.com, can be used to capture insights from consumers and to gain an understanding of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a web‐based virtual ideation tool, dialogr.com, can be used to capture insights from consumers and to gain an understanding of consumer satisfaction with package design during and after product use. The authors also demonstrate how the resulting rich qualitative data can be combined with output from traditional survey research, to provide insight into the impact of satisfaction with package design on purchase intent.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed‐methods approach was employed that captured qualitative insights from a large number of consumers regarding their experience using product packaging and combined the quantitative rigor of survey research to capture brand familiarity and perceptions, as well as brand preference and loyalty.

Findings

Results demonstrate that design is important to consumers and also that consumers are increasingly design literate. The perceived quality of the package design does impact brand evaluation. Negative reactions to product packaging adversely impacted intent to purchase and intent to recommend the product to others.

Practical implications

Results show that the mixed model is a promising method for gaining feedback on new package designs. Substantive implications include: design drives purchase, consumers want to be involved in design, and getting user input on design is important.

Originality/value

Consumer packaged goods companies often test packaging prototypes in a limited way – they either ignore qualitative measurement completely or use small sample focus groups. This quali‐quant method offers two advantages over the methodologies most commonly used to study package design; it has the capacity to engage large numbers of consumers and it can be set up to gather data from consumers during or immediately after product use.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

A.J. Dane

This paper will attempt to highlight significant problems of a thermal nature, encountered during 17 years' extensive use of multilayer printed circuit boards in high technology…

Abstract

This paper will attempt to highlight significant problems of a thermal nature, encountered during 17 years' extensive use of multilayer printed circuit boards in high technology Avionics Systems, together with recommended corrective actions.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2024

Natalie Wall

Abstract

Details

Black Expression and White Generosity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-758-2

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

T.P. Beane and D.M. Ennis

It is important to remain creative when conducting segmentation research, as many different ways to segment a market can exist. Five main bases are discussed: geographic…

36726

Abstract

It is important to remain creative when conducting segmentation research, as many different ways to segment a market can exist. Five main bases are discussed: geographic, demographic, psychographic, behaviouristic and image. This is followed by an overview of the main techniques used to establish and verify segments, including automatic interaction detector, conjoint analysis, multidimensional scaling and canonical analysis.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Shqipe Gashi Nulleshi

This paper aims to add to the theorization of family dynamics and women’s entrepreneurship by examining women’s influence on decision-making in family businesses. Business…

1830

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to add to the theorization of family dynamics and women’s entrepreneurship by examining women’s influence on decision-making in family businesses. Business decisions in family firms, in particular, are not free from family influence in terms of goals and strategies, and the role of women in decision-making processes is of particular interest. Consequently, the role of women entrepreneurs in family firms and their influence on business development requires a more fine-grained analysis of the family dynamic within the family and the business.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on a qualitative study and focuses on the life story narratives of nine women in rural family businesses in rural communities of Småland province in Sweden to empirically examine the decision-making processes. This region is known both for its entrepreneurial culture and traditional gender order. Based on the narrative accounts of women entrepreneurs in family businesses, the data analysis method is thematic, using a Gioia-inspired method.

Findings

The complexity of decision-making in rural family firms is further complicated in part due to a closeness with the rural community. Thus, a typology of three decision-making modes in family firms emerges an informal family-oriented mode, a semistructured family/employee consensus mode and a formal board mode with at least one nonfamily member. Moreover, the advantages, disadvantages and strategies that women use to influence decisions within the respective mode are outlined.

Originality/value

This work contributes to the study of women’s agency and its implications in family business and entrepreneurship in the rural context. The study implies that women’s agency shapes the (rural) entrepreneurship context and, likewise, the (rural) entrepreneurship context influences women’s agency. Hence, the author challenges the view of women as only caregivers and sheds light on the practices and processes behind the scenes of entrepreneurial family businesses.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2023

Ifra Bashir and Ishtiaq Hussain Qureshi

The United Nation's 2030 mission provides scholars, practitioners and governments with a valuable framework to direct their research in a way that tackles societal issues. Towards…

Abstract

Purpose

The United Nation's 2030 mission provides scholars, practitioners and governments with a valuable framework to direct their research in a way that tackles societal issues. Towards this aim, some key Sustainable Development Goals focus on improving the well-being of humans and societies; however, the literature dealing with individual financial well-being is still underdeveloped and fragmented. To address this significant research gap, this paper reviews the literature on financial well-being. It provides an in-depth analysis of different theories, mediators and moderators employed in financial well-being studies to deepen the theoretical framework and widen the scope of financial well-being research.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Web of Science Core Collection database (WoS), the literature on financial well-being was reviewed (n = 32) following a systematic review approach.

Findings

Findings revealed that (a) there is a limited application of theories in financial well-being studies (n = 19) with the majority of studies (n = 15) employing only one theory; (b) twenty-one different theories were used with the maximum number of theories employed by any study was four; (c) the theory of planned behavior was the most commonly used (n = 4); (d) While a reasonable number of studies examine mediators and moderators in antecedents-financial well-being relationships, studies examining mediators and moderators relationships in financial well-being-outcomes relationships are limited. Based on these findings, this review identified a need for future theory-based financial well-being research and examining the role of underlying and intervening mechanisms in antecedents-financial well-being-outcomes relationships.

Originality/value

The study concludes by suggesting some relevant theories and prospective variables that can explain potential financial well-being relationships. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first review on the use of theories, mediators and moderators in financial well-being studies.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2022

Long She, Hassam Waheed, Weng Marc Lim and Sahar E-Vahdati

Financial well-being among young adults is an emerging and important field of research. This study aims to shed light on the current insights and future directions for young…

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Abstract

Purpose

Financial well-being among young adults is an emerging and important field of research. This study aims to shed light on the current insights and future directions for young adults’ financial well-being research.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was performed using (1) the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses protocol to curate the corpus and (2) the bibliometric-content analysis technique to review that corpus on young adults’ financial well-being research.

Findings

Young adults’ financial well-being is influenced by contextual factors such as changes in macroeconomic environment, market factors, technological advancement and financial social comparisons, as well as personal factors such as sociodemographics, personality traits and values, skills and attitudes, financial practices, financial socialization, lifestyles and early life experiences, and subjective financial situation and mental health. Noteworthily, interest in this field is growing with a plethora of journals, countries, authors, theories, methods and measures.

Research limitations/implications

Several noteworthy gaps exist in the literature on young adults’ financial well-being, which include the lack of international collaboration, the lack of interventions to improve young adults’ financial well-being, the limited range of theoretical lenses, the limited consensus on measuring young adults’ financial well-being, the limited understanding of contextual factors, and the inconsistencies between personal factors and young adults’ financial well-being. Potential ways forward are proposed to address these gaps.

Originality/value

This review contributes to a seminal synthesis of young adults’ financial well-being research, providing both retrospective insights and prospective ways forward.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 April 2023

Leonore Riitsalu, Adele Atkinson and Rauno Pello

Financial well-being has gained increased attention in research, policy and the financial sector. The authors contribute to this emerging field by drawing attention to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Financial well-being has gained increased attention in research, policy and the financial sector. The authors contribute to this emerging field by drawing attention to the bottlenecks in financial well-being research and proposing ways for transforming and advancing it.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a semi-systematic review of the latest 120 financial well-being studies from both academic and grey literature and analyse the current issues in defining, conceptualising and measuring it.

Findings

The authors identify the need for a more human-centred approach across content and methodology, conceptualisation and operationalisation, research and practice, that focusses on how individuals experience, interpret and assess financial well-being. The authors highlight the lack of evidence-based interventions for improving financial well-being.

Practical implications

The authors propose applying design science approach for redefining the problems that individuals need help in solving and for developing and testing interventions that improve financial well-being and are in line with individuals’ needs and aspirations. The authors also call for international qualitative research into the human perspective of financial well-being.

Social implications

Financial well-being has a significant role in mental health and well-being; therefore, it affects the lives of individuals and societies far beyond financial affairs. Change of perspective can lead to evidence-based interventions that better the lives of many, reduce inequality and develop more balanced communities.

Originality/value

The authors argue that the human dimension has been assumed in financial well-being research, practice and police, rather than confirmed, based on flawed assumptions that what people experience is already known.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-11-2022-0741

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 50 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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