Search results

1 – 10 of over 150000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nicholas O’Regan

Market share is often used to describe the position and success of a firm in an industrial sector. While the impact of market share is not always reflected in a firm’s…

Abstract

Market share is often used to describe the position and success of a firm in an industrial sector. While the impact of market share is not always reflected in a firm’s profitability or performance, many firms see it as an important organisational goal. Accordingly, it could be argued that market share influences the organisational thinking and strategic planning of small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises. However, it is unclear how and to what extent? The analysis indicates that firms with an increased market share differ significantly from firms with a decreased or static market share on the emphasis given to a number of environmental factors. The analysis shows that firms with increased market share are likely to have higher performance and in particular achieve enhanced financial performance, greater customer retention and customer satisfaction. This applies to all firm sizes. To ensure competitive advantage, firms need to consider market share in conjunction with overall profits.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mark J. Chussil

Market share statistics indicate that success breeds success. To learn to take full advantage of your share, see “Do's and Don'ts,” page 34.

Abstract

Market share statistics indicate that success breeds success. To learn to take full advantage of your share, see “Do's and Don'ts,” page 34.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

David Yerger and Gary David Sawchuk

The paper's aim is to analyze changes in the relative importance of Canada as a supplier for its home markets; and, the rising importance of China versus other Canadian…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to analyze changes in the relative importance of Canada as a supplier for its home markets; and, the rising importance of China versus other Canadian trading partners.

Design/methodology/approach

The market overlap measure (MOM) statistic, developed by Sawchuk and Yerger is used to analyze the Canadian home market shares for Canada and every other nation with sales in the Canadian market for each of 61 different NAIC sectors (56 at the four‐digit NAIC level and five at the three‐digit NAIC level).

Findings

The USA remains the most important foreign supplier to Canadian markets with a weighted average 23.6 percent market share as of 2003 (Canadian‐based production having a 63.0 percent market share). US market share, however, has been declining by nearly a percentage point per year since 2000. Approximately, half of the lost US' market share has been captured by Canadian‐based firms and approximately a quarter has been captured by Chinese production. China's growth in Canadian market share places it second behind only the USA in terms of Canadian‐based firms' home market competitive exposure.

Research limitations/implications

The work does not include an analysis of service sector trade flows due to inadequate data.

Practical implications

The MOM statistic is shown to be a useful diagnostic tool for analyzing the level of, trends in, and industries driving the competitive exposure a nation's firms have on sales in a specified market.

Originality/value

The MOM statistic is shown to yield better insights regarding the actual degree of competitive exposure than does the more commonly used similarity indices such as Finger‐Kreinen.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Christie L. Comunale and Thomas R. Sexton

Arthur Andersen’s conviction and its decision not to audit public firms will transform the Big 5 into the Big 4. Meanwhile, other Big 4 firms face investigations that…

Abstract

Arthur Andersen’s conviction and its decision not to audit public firms will transform the Big 5 into the Big 4. Meanwhile, other Big 4 firms face investigations that threaten their future market shares. The article compares the observed post‐scandal shifts in market share with those estimated by a Markov model. It then estimates the year‐by‐year and long‐term market shares that the Big 4 firms would have achieved had they remained untouched by these investigations. The study finds that the absence of Arthur Andersen alone would not have led to excessive market share concentration. It demonstrates how the post‐scandal shifts reveal the impacts of the investigations on the Big 4 firms and provides market share benchmarks against which the firms can evaluate the long‐term effects of the investigations. Finally, the article concludes that a firm’s long‐term gain in market share depends on its ability to retain audit clients.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 18 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Barrie James

The accepted primary objective of most companies, which is reflected in their marketing strategy, is to maximise profitability.

Abstract

The accepted primary objective of most companies, which is reflected in their marketing strategy, is to maximise profitability.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Birger Wernerfelt

Gaining market share can be a means of obtaining profits. While one cannot develop precise prescriptions for gaining market share in complex and dynamic environments, a…

Abstract

Gaining market share can be a means of obtaining profits. While one cannot develop precise prescriptions for gaining market share in complex and dynamic environments, a stylized model can provide a reference point for evaluating what to do in more complex situations.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ling Liang, Lin Tian, Jiaping Xie, Jianhong Xu and Weisi Zhang

The car-sharing market has entered the mature stage, and consumers' demand shows a diversified increasing trend. This paper considers two modes of operation and two…

Abstract

Purpose

The car-sharing market has entered the mature stage, and consumers' demand shows a diversified increasing trend. This paper considers two modes of operation and two pricing strategies, which are business-to-consumer and consumer-to-consumer modes, market pricing and platform pricing. Under these conditions, the platform's revenue-sharing ratio will be different. The purpose of this paper is to explore this research question, and seeks an optimal pricing mechanism that can achieve a win–win situation between platform and automobile manufacturer in the two market modes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors design different profit functions for platform under the two contexts. Of course, the platform's function is constrained to the manufacturer's function. By introducing a revenue-sharing contract a Stackelberg game model dominated by the platform is established and the equilibrium solutions under the two pricing models are derived.

Findings

The study found that even if only market pricing is executed, the scale of the car-sharing market will continue to expand. As the car-sharing market becomes more saturated, platform pricing is better for the automobile manufacturer; in most cases, the platform prefers platform pricing, but when the number of private cars is relatively small, if the cost of car operation and maintenance for the automobile manufacturer is lower or the revenue-sharing ratio of private cars is high, then market pricing will be more favorable to the platform.

Practical implications

With the cross-border integration of car service platforms and the automobile manufacturing industry, the key to achieving win–win cooperation and sustainable development in the car-sharing market will converge on the question of how to design a suitable pricing mechanism and revenue-sharing method.

Originality/value

Authors have determined how a car-sharing platform achieves a win–win order pricing strategy with the manufacturer and private car owners, respectively. And authors combined the supply chain revenue-sharing contract with the car-sharing market to explore the application of the revenue-sharing contract in the sharing economy.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Robert Kozielski, Michał Dziekoński, Michał Medowski, Jacek Pogorzelski and Marcin Ostachowski

Companies spend millions on training their sales representatives. Thousands of textbooks have been published; thousands of training videos have been recorded. Hundreds of…

Abstract

Companies spend millions on training their sales representatives. Thousands of textbooks have been published; thousands of training videos have been recorded. Hundreds of good pieces of advice and tips for sales representatives have been presented along with hundreds of sales methods and techniques. Probably the largest number of indicators and measures are applied in sales and distribution. On the one hand, this is a result of the fact that sales provide revenue and profit to a company; on the other hand, the concept of management by objectives turns out to be most effective in regional sales teams with reference to sales representatives and methods of performance evaluation. As a result, a whole array of indices has been created which enable the evaluation of sales representatives’ work and make it possible to manage goods distribution in a better way.

The indices presented in this chapter are rooted in the consumer market and are applied most often to this type of market (particularly in relation to fast-moving consumer goods at the level of retail trade). Nevertheless, many of them can be used on other markets (services, means of production) and at other trade levels (wholesale).

Although the values of many indices presented herein are usually calculated by market research agencies and delivered to companies in the form of synthetic results, we have placed the emphasis on the ability to determine them independently, both in descriptive and exemplifying terms. We consider it important to understand the genesis of indices and build the ability to interpret them on that basis. What is significant is that the indices can be interpreted differently; the same index may provide a different assessment of a product’s, brand or company’s position in the market depending on the parameters taken into account. Therefore, we strive to show a certain way of thinking rather than give ready-made recipes and cite ‘proven’ principles. Sales and distribution are dynamic phenomena, and limiting them within the framework of ‘one proper’ interpretation would be an intellectual abuse.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kari Heimonen and Outi Uusitalo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of advertising expenditure on brands' market shares, utilizing a novel four‐week advertising‐sales data from the highly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of advertising expenditure on brands' market shares, utilizing a novel four‐week advertising‐sales data from the highly competitive oligopolistic Finnish beer market in which price competition among the homogeneous larger‐type beer brands is not allowed during the period of the study.

Design/methodology/approach

Competition is modelled using the Lanchester model. The impacts of advertising on market shares are estimated using the impulse‐response functions from vector autoregression, and the full information maximum likelihood and advertising elasticities.

Findings

Some new insights into beer market dynamics are obtained. First, the impacts of advertising are not similar across brands. Second, overspills of advertising impacts across brands are detected. Third, the reactions to competitors' advertising attacks are mild.

Originality/value

The paper utilizes four‐week brand‐level data on the market shares of the leading beer brands in Finland and the brands' advertising expenditure. During the period of the data, price competition is not allowed, which creates a unique opportunity to study the impacts of advertising on the market shares of brands.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Dean C.H. Wilkie, Lester W. Johnson and Lesley White

This research aims to provide an empirical comparison of the results of three brands' marketing defence strategies used in advance of generic brands entering the market

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to provide an empirical comparison of the results of three brands' marketing defence strategies used in advance of generic brands entering the market. By reviewing the effectiveness of these strategies, this research looks to extend the research on marketing defence strategies into the importance of anticipating competitor launches.

Design/methodology/approach

A data set containing 243 weeks of scanned sales for 21 generic brands was used in a regression model aimed at measuring the effectiveness of each brand's defence strategies in deterring entry and limiting the market share of these generic brands.

Findings

The analysis shows that several marketing mix components were effective in limiting the impact of generic brands. What was critical to each component's success was ensuring that they were implemented before the launch of the generic brands.

Research limitations/implications

This research has the limitation of being confined to a category of pharmaceutical allergy brands, which limits generalisation of the findings.

Practical implications

The managerial relevance of this research has two parts. First, it will encourage managers to move from implementing strategies in reaction to a competitor launch to implementing strategies in advance of their entry. Second, it provides insights into the effectiveness of several strategic options for brands facing the entry of generic brands.

Originality/value

This study brings together literature regarding entry deterrence and market share loss prevention to help highlight the importance of proactive marketing defence strategies in reducing both the number of entrants and the amount of market share lost. It uses a data set to provide an empirical review of a range of marketing mix components used by pharmaceutical brands against low‐price generic brands.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 150000