Search results

1 – 10 of over 60000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

R. Callahan and J. Ewanich

Being competitive in the high performance IC market requires package design concepts which keep pace with the rapid increase in device complexity. Devices operating in the…

Abstract

Being competitive in the high performance IC market requires package design concepts which keep pace with the rapid increase in device complexity. Devices operating in the 50 watt/500 MHz range impose stringent performance specifications on package designs. Rapid package designs are essential in keeping pace with device development. Accurate modelling of electrical, thermal and mechanical properties is also necessary. The use of CAD in advanced package design eliminates the need for each engineer to create a drawing to perform his specific design task. The design tape created by the packaging engineer can be used by the engineer performing the 3‐D electrical modelling functions. It can be used to display the package design at an off‐site product engineering review. The ceramic package manufacturer can use it in tooling the package. This paper discusses the use of CAD to design, model and manufacture a 169 lead ceramic pin grid array for an ECL standard cell application, and the advantages resulting from its use.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Lise Magnier and Dominique Crié

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of eco-designed packaging on consumers’ responses. It defines the concept of eco-designed packaging, and proposes a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of eco-designed packaging on consumers’ responses. It defines the concept of eco-designed packaging, and proposes a consumer-led taxonomy of its cues. Attitudinal and behavioral, positive and negative responses triggered by the perception of these signals are analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Results were reached through qualitative methods. A phenomenological approach consisting of eight in-depth interviews has been followed by a series of ten Zaltman Metaphor Elicitation Technique (ZMET) interviews. The synergy of these two methods is underlined.

Findings

The complexity of packaging ecological cues perception is outlined by expressing the differences in the nature of these cues. A taxonomy is then presented; ecological cues fall into three categories: structural cues, graphical/iconic cues and informational cues. Finally, consumers’ responses to the perception of eco-designed packaging are presented and perceived benefits and perceived sacrifices are revealed.

Practical implications

Packaging is of great importance in consumers’ purchase decision process, especially in situations of temporal pressure and hyperchoice environments. Since consumers take more and more into account the ethicality of the brand in their consumption, the understanding of their attitudes and behaviors toward eco-designed packaging may enable brands to build a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The literature review reveals that there is no similar research available. The use of two qualitative methods enables to understand consumers’ deep-seated motivations, attitudes and behaviors toward eco-designed packaging. The results of this study can also be used by advertisers, for social marketing campaigns, to encourage consumers to reduce the global ecological footprint of packaging.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Lynn Metcalf, Jeffrey S. Hess, Jeffrey E. Danes and Jay Singh

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a web‐based virtual ideation tool, dialogr.com, can be used to capture insights from consumers and to gain an understanding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a web‐based virtual ideation tool, dialogr.com, can be used to capture insights from consumers and to gain an understanding of consumer satisfaction with package design during and after product use. The authors also demonstrate how the resulting rich qualitative data can be combined with output from traditional survey research, to provide insight into the impact of satisfaction with package design on purchase intent.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed‐methods approach was employed that captured qualitative insights from a large number of consumers regarding their experience using product packaging and combined the quantitative rigor of survey research to capture brand familiarity and perceptions, as well as brand preference and loyalty.

Findings

Results demonstrate that design is important to consumers and also that consumers are increasingly design literate. The perceived quality of the package design does impact brand evaluation. Negative reactions to product packaging adversely impacted intent to purchase and intent to recommend the product to others.

Practical implications

Results show that the mixed model is a promising method for gaining feedback on new package designs. Substantive implications include: design drives purchase, consumers want to be involved in design, and getting user input on design is important.

Originality/value

Consumer packaged goods companies often test packaging prototypes in a limited way – they either ignore qualitative measurement completely or use small sample focus groups. This quali‐quant method offers two advantages over the methodologies most commonly used to study package design; it has the capacity to engage large numbers of consumers and it can be set up to gather data from consumers during or immediately after product use.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Delia Vazquez, Margaret Bruce and Rachel Studd

Food retailers invest heavily in design expertise to create exciting packaging to entice customers to buy premium food products, and to strengthen their competitive edge…

Abstract

Food retailers invest heavily in design expertise to create exciting packaging to entice customers to buy premium food products, and to strengthen their competitive edge. The process by which food retailers manage food packaging design has not been documented and this is an oversight in the design management and retailing literatures that this paper addresses. An in‐depth case study of one of the top four UK retailers is presented and their approach pack design management is analysed and discussed. The process outlined here was in place in 1997 at a time when the retailer had just moved from number three in the market place to number two and was aiming to be number one. The process documented is that of a dynamic growing food retailer working on improving its brand image through packaging design.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Jesús García‐Arca and José Carlos Prado Prado

This paper aims to present an integrated management model for packaging design.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an integrated management model for packaging design.

Design/methodology/approach

This model is the result of research of the concepts of packaging, logistics and “packaging logistics”. With this approach in mind, the design and development of packaging are structured on four basic corner‐stones, i.e. the definition and understanding of design requirements (logistics, marketing and environmental aspects), the definition of an appropriate organizational structure, the application of “best practices”, and, finally, establishing a control system.

Findings

It was found that the management model developed provides companies with a useful quantitative tool to find the “trade‐off” between the logistics costs reduction and the differentiation capacity linked to packaging.

Originality/value

The model proposed is designed to fill a gap in the measurement systems for making an evaluation of the detailed impact on the overall operation of the supply chain in certain packaging design decisions.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Alex Gofman, Howard R. Moskowitz and Tõnis Mets

This paper seeks to explore approaches to consumer‐driven optimization of package design utilizing a novel modified conjoint analysis approach. The approach allows for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore approaches to consumer‐driven optimization of package design utilizing a novel modified conjoint analysis approach. The approach allows for dynamic creation and testing of a large number of design prototypes with consumers and finds optimal solutions on an aggregated, segmented (pattern‐based latent mindset segmentation) and individual basis.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach extends the consumer insights‐driven process, Rule Developing Experimentation (RDE), introduced by the authors (AG and HM) and developed in cooperation with Wharton School of Business (University of Pennsylvania), to graphical concepts.

Findings

Disciplined experimentation based on individual permuted experimental designs produces more targeted package designs with higher appeal to the consumers. The proposed steps describe fast, parsimonious and actionable process of application of RDE to package optimization, which provides valuable input for designers about consumer preferences.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates that consumer research could and should be a central part not only at the final stages of the package design but at the initial stage as well. The steps of fitting the research into the package design process are shown providing a parsimonious way to include consumers in the early stages of package design.

Originality/value

The approach could help the marketers efficiently create better packages that consumers like and which will help marketers to differentiate their respective products from the competition.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Tomofumi Miyanoshita, Tohru Yoshioka-Kobayashi and Daisuke Kanama

Researchers have pointed out that product packaging in the food industry has a significant influence on consumer decision-making. However, the impact of package

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have pointed out that product packaging in the food industry has a significant influence on consumer decision-making. However, the impact of package development on firm performance has not been investigated due to the limited availability of analyses on package design. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between package development and firm performance in the Japanese food manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically analyzed the relationship between package development and firm performance in the Japanese food manufacturing industry by using design patents data.

Findings

As a result of multiple regression analysis, it became clear that the number of design patents related to packaging is significantly linked to the operating profit ratio, growth rate of sales and increase in operating profits of firms. Moreover, the results show inverse U-shaped effects between design patents and firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply the importance of effective package design management.

Originality/value

This study provides novel insight on both marketing strategy and intellectual property management in the food industry, and it also provides a new method for empirical analysis using design patent data.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Nazife Karamullaoglu and Ozlem Sandikci

This paper aims to understand how social, cultural and political economic dynamics inform packaging design. Specifically, it focuses on one of the oldest Turkish pasta…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand how social, cultural and political economic dynamics inform packaging design. Specifically, it focuses on one of the oldest Turkish pasta brands, Piyale, and seeks to understand the impact of the changes in the macro-institutional structures on its packaging practices over the course of almost a century.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is mainly based on data collected through archival and documentary research. The archival data are gathered from various sources including the personal archives of the former managers, advertisements published in the popular magazines of the time and industry reports and documents. Data are analyzed using a combination of compositional and social semiotic analysis.

Findings

The analysis indicates four distinct periods in the brand’s history. The design elements and visual identity reflect the social, cultural, political, economic and technological changes shaping the Turkish society in these different time periods. The findings show that a socio-historically situated analysis of a brand’s packaging design transformation reveals the complex relationship between design and culture and provides clues to the market-society interface.

Originality/value

This study provides a comprehensive historical analysis of the visual identity evolution of the oldest Turkish pasta brand Piyale and contributes to research on packaging histories in the non-Western markets.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Carl Wänström and Lars Medbo

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of how the materials feeding design at a workstation impacts the assembly process performance, in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of how the materials feeding design at a workstation impacts the assembly process performance, in terms of manufacturing flexibility, process support, materials planning and work task efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data are based on two embedded case studies performed in close corporation with two Swedish automotive companies; additional observations from more than 20 company visits in Japan, and small‐scale case studies performed in Japanese companies. To fully assess the work measurement figures, video recordings, work instructions and layout drawings were used to plot the operators' walking patterns, and it was then possible to map the whole work cycle for an operator. Industrial engineers, managers, group leaders, team leaders and operators were interviewed. Based on the literature review and personal experience from the small‐scale case studies carried out in Japan, the existing assembly systems' component racks were conceptually re‐designed. This led to two hypothetical assembly systems, which could be used for understanding the impact of materials feeding design on assembly process performance. The design of the new component racks and the choice of packaging types were made together with practitioners.

Findings

The paper shows that the design of component racks and choice of packaging types have a major impact on the assembly process performance. Component racks with a large depth and small width and tailored packages create important advantages over traditional Swedish component racks designed for EUR‐pallets. Line stocking is not always the best choice for materials feeding, but this paper shows that line stocking, especially in Swedish assembly systems, can be improved. Sequencing can thus be reduced, resulting in fewer problems when there are sequence breaks in the production flow. Component racks with small packages and large depth increase the work task efficiency, volume, mix, new products and modification flexibility. For example, free space is an important issue for these types of flexibilities. Component racks that are portable and easy to rearrange, together with free space, greatly facilitate handling of new product introductions or modifications of products. The new and old component can be displayed and fed to the same workstation, and if there is a larger change a whole segment of a component rack can easily be replaced by a new one between work shifts.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the study is limited to the conditions at workstations. Consequences for the materials flow upstream (i.e. internal materials handling, warehousing, transport, supplier processes, etc.) are not included, but must in further studies also be considered to avoid sub‐optimisation.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the fact that a shift in focus is necessary when designing workstations with component racks in Swedish companies, meaning that operators become the customers rather than the transport company or materials handler.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Eva Johansson and Mats I. Johansson

This research aims to develop a model for describing and analysing materials supply systems (MSSs) design in product development projects (PDPs).

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to develop a model for describing and analysing materials supply systems (MSSs) design in product development projects (PDPs).

Design/methodology/approach

Literature on materials supply and production systems design is reviewed in order to derive a MSSs design model. The model is applied to empirical data from a qualitative case study, which exemplifies how the model can serve to describe MSSs design in PDPs. Moreover, the model is used to analyse the empirical data related to the focus and characteristics of the design issues.

Findings

The model developed contains six areas: materials feeding, storage, transportation, handling, packaging, and manufacturing planning and control at four levels: supply chain, plant, sub‐unit, and utility.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could complement the model by developing a design process to enable systematic design of the MSS as well as the integration of materials supply aspects at an early stage of PDPs. Such a design process should also consider the design of the flows of specific components.

Practical implications

The importance of considering the relationships between the six design areas as well as evaluating the whole MSS is highlighted.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the materials supply aspects dealt with in PDPs, which have been the subject of little research interest so far, despite the fact that extensive resources are required for materials supply activities.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 60000