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1 – 10 of over 104000
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Jeffrey Chi Hoe Mok and Anita Ann Lee Toh

This paper aims to investigate the use of blind marking to increase the ability of criterion-referenced marking to discriminate students’ varied levels of knowledge and skill…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the use of blind marking to increase the ability of criterion-referenced marking to discriminate students’ varied levels of knowledge and skill mastery in a business communication skills course.

Design/methodology/approach

The business communication course in this study involved more than 10 teachers and 350 students each semester. Data were collected from four semesters of assignment grades to compare the distribution of grades in semesters that used blind marking and in the one that did not (the control group). The standard deviations of marks for each assignment were calculated and compared.

Findings

Findings show that blind marking contributed to a wider spread of marks. The study concludes that blind marking, when implemented together with criterion-referenced marking rubrics, can improve the ability of qualitative assessments to discriminate student achievement levels.

Originality/value

Research in the use of criterion-referenced marking rubrics has revealed that assessing with marking rubrics resulted in a wider range of marks awarded because assessors felt that the rubrics helped them make more objective judgments of students’ work (Kuisma, 1999). By this token, it could be argued that because blind marking allows more objective judgment of students’ work (by reducing rater bias), it seems to reason that marks might be awarded on a wider range of the marking scale. However, current literature on blind marking and grade/mark dispersion has yet to reveal a study on whether blind marking is able to increase the spread of marks, and therefore, indicate that an assessment instrument is effective is discriminating a range of student achievement levels. This paper should add to the current research on higher quality of educational assessments.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Carl Evans and John Gardener

The purpose of this paper is to highlight to universities the approach of professional associations in marking large volumes of assessments.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight to universities the approach of professional associations in marking large volumes of assessments.

Design/methodology/approach

The issues arising in marking large undergraduate modules in universities are discussed, before describing the approach typically adopted by professional associations. The benefit for universities of adopting such an approach is then examined.

Findings

The key to marking large volumes for professional associations lies in the initial standardisation meeting, on-going discussions between markers and an ability to check and if necessary stop the marking process at several points in the marking cycle, until agreement and consistency between markers are achieved.

Research limitations/implications

This viewpoint paper is based on the experiences of the two authors in assessing professional business management associations, and not empirical research.

Practical implications

The approach described here to marking large volumes of undergraduate assessments offers a practical solution to the prevailing issues concerning consistency across teaching teams.

Originality/value

The application of the approach of professional associations to the issues surrounding marking large undergraduate modules offers a unique proposition for university staff to consider.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Claire Lewin

The aim of this paper is to stimulate further discussion on divergent institutional and academic needs for effective marking processes to evaluate student work in Australian…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to stimulate further discussion on divergent institutional and academic needs for effective marking processes to evaluate student work in Australian universities. This is in specific response to institutional stated goals and emerging policies under current economic realities. After identifying the three significant areas of marking that must be addressed: content, consistency and cost; the author proposes that the use of the AERO‐dynamic model of marking will reduce academic workloads and provide institutions with an effective marking process to meet corporate budgets.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is a synthesis of researcher participation and discourse interpretation. It is based on a cynical response to changing realities and resides in the arena of the “Theatre of the Absurd”.

Findings

The AERO‐dynamic model of marking was found to be highly cost effective for institutions with large student cohorts and ever diminishing budgets. Critical analysis identified areas of concern in marking consistency and assignment content and recommends specific actions to address these but also identifies that no process will be perfect and that some tradeoffs between cost, consistency and content need to be made. The role of the academic within this marking process is redefined and the implications of this for both institution and individual acknowledged.

Originality/value

This paper offers a starting point for further debate into the widening gap between student expectations on assignment marking and institutional resource allocation and support.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Brian Poole

The purpose of this paper is to examine the way “moderation” is defined and operationalised at UK universities. It is hoped that this investigation provides pointers for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the way “moderation” is defined and operationalised at UK universities. It is hoped that this investigation provides pointers for modifications in university documentation and practices, as well as indicates possible areas for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper begins with a review of relevant scholarly literature, first tracing the history of the concept of moderation (essentially meaning the avoidance of extremes) in western thought and then proceeding to show how moderation is understood and operationalised in UK universities. Relevant documentation from 10 UK universities, all in the public domain, is analysed to show both commonalities and differences in definition and operationalisation of moderation.

Findings

This paper shows that universities differ in their understanding of the scope of moderation, with some seeing it as covering the evaluation of draft assessment artifacts. It is also noted that the distinction between moderation and marking is not always expressed in university documentation in ways that distinguish between the two with maximal clarity.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the relatively small sample of documents examined. Conversely, ancient universities (e.g. Edinburgh), long-established universities (e.g. Manchester) and 1992 and more recent universities (e.g. Manchester Metropolitan University and Suffolk) are contained in the sample, so moderation practices from across the sector are included.

Practical implications

The main findings are that some universities see moderation as including drafting, redrafting and approval of assessment artifacts, whereas others do not. In addition, although all universities stress that moderation and marking are separate activities, some documentation discusses both the activities in tandem; thus, undermining the contention that they are discrete. Both these findings have implications for UK university documentation in terms of both document structure and precise wording.

Originality/value

The approach taken, in which a sample of publicly available university documents is scrutinised and evaluated, casts a new light on understandings of “moderation”, which is a term and concept that may not always be examined critically by lecturers and quality assurance professionals involved in higher education.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Abdulaziz M. Jarkas

Since the construction industry in the State of Kuwait is further governed by a competitive environment, which is driven by the lowest cost mentality, the aim of this study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the construction industry in the State of Kuwait is further governed by a competitive environment, which is driven by the lowest cost mentality, the aim of this study is to identify and rank the relative importance of factors perceived to influence bid mark‐up size decisions among local general contractors bidding on construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The effects of 40 identified factors, which were shortlisted based on previous relevant investigations and the input of local industry experts, were surveyed by a statistically representative sample of contractors. Using the “relative importance index” technique, the influence ranks of the factors explored were established.

Findings

The results reveal the following as the primary factors affecting general contractors' bid mark‐up size decisions: employer type and identity; project size; clarity of technical specifications; previous experience with employer; number and identity of competitors; previous experience in similar projects; design complexity level; current work load; design quality level; and tendering duration.

Research limitations/implications

Although the outputs contribute to the overall body of knowledge related to bidding in the construction industry, it is further recommended to determine the relationship between the factors explored, especially those perceived as most significant, and their tangible effects on contractors' mark‐up decisions.

Practical implications

The outcomes: demonstrate the importance of the “constructability” concept to construction costs; and assert that the conception of exerting pressure on designers to cut down design durations and fees, and further shortening tenders' durations to speed up the projects' development process, is “false economy”.

Originality/value

The findings fill a gap in knowledge of the factors affecting contractors' bid mark‐up decisions, which can be used to provide academics, employers, industry practitioners, and policy makers, direction for focusing, acting upon and controlling the primary factors perceived to impact the competitiveness level of the State's construction industry.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Ann Rippin

This paper aims to explore the gendered narratives of change management at Marks and Spencer (M&S) and uses them as a lens to consider the gendered nature of the change process…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the gendered narratives of change management at Marks and Spencer (M&S) and uses them as a lens to consider the gendered nature of the change process itself.

Design/methodology/approach

Two extant stories: Sleeping Beauty and the Trojan War are taken, along with the cultural archetype of the American West gunslinger to explore the gender aspects of change. The Marks and Spencer case is analysed using the corollary patriarchal narrative of Sleeping Beauty, a story whose organising logic is revealed as one of concern for patriarchal lineage, and legitimate succession. The paper, draws on the Marks and Spencer principals' memoirs and biographies.

Findings

Sleeping Beauty is shown as a narrative saturated in misogyny, aggression and violence. This violence, which is shown to characterise the Marks and Spencer case, is amplified in the second narrative, the Trojan War, in the highly personalised battles of the über‐warriors of The Iliad. The paper concludes that violent, hyper‐masculine behaviour creates and maintains a destructive cycle of leadership lionisation and failure at the company which precludes a more feminine and possibly more effective construction of change management.

Originality/value

Demonstrates how M&S, gendered from its birth, its development through the golden years, the crisis, its changes in leadership and its recent change management has attempted to respond to its changing environment.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

William L. Smith, David M. Boje and Kevin D. Melendrez

The purpose of this paper is to analyze media storytelling and rhetoric surrounding the credibility of the longstanding accounting practice of mark‐to‐market valuation.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze media storytelling and rhetoric surrounding the credibility of the longstanding accounting practice of mark‐to‐market valuation.

Design/methodology/approach

The cascading storytelling model of progressive framing by the media of mark‐to‐market valuation was applied to story subsets of the three types of classic Aristotelian rhetorical appeals.

Findings

The authors found that the media blamed the accounting profession's mark‐to‐market valuation practices as substantive cause of recent corporate problems and declines in market values. In addition, the rhetorical framing of mark‐to‐market accounting practices in the media prompted the Financial Accounting Standards Board to a rush to judgment.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited to the analysis of the storytelling included. Different results from other sources may provide another result.

Practical implications

The failure in the media to address the duality between the logos of accounting and the ethos of the media narratives exacerbated the cascading activation. Understanding this duality may provide a different lens in looking at information dissemination. This is not only relative to stakeholders in making more informed decisions but should also serve as a warning to the profession, to have more voice, to use a rhetorical strategy that can have more saliency in the public arena.

Originality/value

The paper examined storytelling as interplay of retrospective narrative, the presentness of living story, and the antenarratives shaping the future of not only the unfolding economic crisis, but the future of accounting itself. In terms of rhetoric, we extended the application of pathos, ethos, and logos by examining a cascading activation theory model. This is one of the few studies of antenarratives and how through cascade rhetoric the future is shaped.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Howard Johnson

On 21st July 1994 the Trade Marks Act 1994 received the Royal Assent. It introduces the most radical overhaul of British trade mark law for over 50 years and replaces the current…

Abstract

On 21st July 1994 the Trade Marks Act 1994 received the Royal Assent. It introduces the most radical overhaul of British trade mark law for over 50 years and replaces the current regime set out in the Trade Marks Act 1938 as amended. The reforms reflect the increased significance of trade marks in modern commerce and the concerns of business that the current law was increasingly anachronistic.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 37 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Afroza Begum

This paper aims to investigate the Indian legal and judicial approaches to well-known trademark (WT) by placing special focus on the way the judiciary has striven to foster the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the Indian legal and judicial approaches to well-known trademark (WT) by placing special focus on the way the judiciary has striven to foster the regulatory goal of defending the distinctiveness of WT.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on primary and secondary resources; especially, the paper critically examines the central piece of legislation relevant to WT and analyses and compares a number of important judicial decisions of India.

Findings

Despite some limitations, the judicial initiatives reflect an impressive progression towards WT, and given the contemporary commercial imperatives backed up by technological advances, the interconnectedness of economies and global corporisation, such a progression is indispensable.

Research limitations/implications

The research involves only the legal aspects of WT; therefore, the social and economic implication is beyond the scope of it.

Practical implications

Even though the legal and judicial attempts in India have raised an inevitable tension between different competing claims and are in some instances intensely debated, a review of existing resources evidences a series of effective methods and practices where a balance can sensibly be drawn between those claims.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Matthew J. Elsmore

Examines the current protection afforded to brand owners within the realms of cyberspace, specifically the World Wide Web. Trade mark law currently provides a benchmark for the…

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Abstract

Examines the current protection afforded to brand owners within the realms of cyberspace, specifically the World Wide Web. Trade mark law currently provides a benchmark for the law and its attempt to regulate the problematical operation of Internet addresses and Web sites. These commercial sites can be contacted by potential customers through the operation of “Internet domain names”. It is the abuse of these valuable domain names, however, that has aroused considerable controversy for brand owners over recent years. In particular, the apparently powerful terrestrial brands have proved easy targets as cyberbrands – for those rather unscrupulous individuals seeking to take advantage of considerable brand goodwill by placing them on the Internet, only to ransom to the highest bidder, often the (terrestrially) “legitimate owners”. Brand owners must remain vigilant, and this article analyses the curent situation and offers sensible and practical advice for those seeking safe and cost‐effective brand exposure on the Information SuperHighway.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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