Search results

1 – 10 of over 19000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Daryl May and Phil Askham

Agenda for Change is set to be the biggest reform of pay since the National Health Service (NHS) began in 1948. As well as introducing a standardised pay structure; it…

Abstract

Purpose

Agenda for Change is set to be the biggest reform of pay since the National Health Service (NHS) began in 1948. As well as introducing a standardised pay structure; it also aims to improve recruitment, retention and staff morale. Staff groups identified as having recruitment and retention problems include estates/works officers, qualified maintenance crafts persons and qualified maintenance technicians. The object of this research was to investigate recruitment and retention problems for estates and facilities staff currently experienced by Trusts.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were used as the primary method of data collection in an attempt to tap into the existing expertise of staff working at strategic and operational supervisory positions in a wide range of Trusts.

Findings

Although our findings suggest that the main recruitment and retention issues fall into four main themes: social, financial, environmental and political; recruitment and retention of estates and facilities management staff is a complex problem involving a wide range of issues and these can vary from location to location. Furthermore this should also be seen as a series of issues that varies across employment groups including: domestic/housekeeping, trades, managers/officers and facilities directors, which need to be distinguished.

Practical implications

There is a continuing need to raise the profile of estates and facilities management staff in the NHS to those levels enjoyed by Human Resource (HR) and Financial Management. Furthermore perceptions surrounding both recruitment and retention issues and the nature of work within estates and facilities management staff in the NHS can lead to a negative and self‐perpetuating “cycle of failure” where there is an assumption of loss of control. However, there are some initiatives being undertaken that suggest it is possible to concentrate on internal matters such as more appropriate and flexible recruitment processes, improved support services for staff and greater flexibility within the job and that these can generate “cycles of success”.

Originality/value

The paper looks in‐depth at the current recruitment and retention problems for NHS estates and facilities staff. The paper would be of use to NHS estates and facilities managers who are currently investigating workforce issues, particularly surrounding recruitment and retention of staff.

Details

Facilities, vol. 23 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Pramila Rao

The purpose of this paper is to detail staffing practices of five software companies located in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to detail staffing practices of five software companies located in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research paper uses purposeful sampling to provide rich data on senior‐level staffing practices. The interviews conducted in India are tape‐recorded and notes are also taken diligently. The interviews are coded to identify similar and dissimilar themes.

Findings

This research identifies internal recruitment, employer references, succession planning, interviews, personality tests, newspaper recruitment, professional search agencies, and bio‐data as the predominant senior‐level staffing practices.

Practical implications

The paper identifies successful staffing practices adopted by domestic software companies. As multinational companies significantly increase their presence in India, global practitioners can implement successful staffing practices by having a thorough understanding of local staffing practices.

Originality/value

This paper identifies successful staffing practices of the Indian software organizations. This paper further provides a staffing model based on the Lepak and Snell staffing typology and details the main human resource management challenges of the Indian software industry.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Trang Thi Huynh

This paper aims to conduct an exploratory research of recruitment source and professional staff retention for succession planning, as well as suggests some experiences of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conduct an exploratory research of recruitment source and professional staff retention for succession planning, as well as suggests some experiences of keeping qualified staff in Vietnamese libraries. It stems from the context of academic and public libraries in the Mekong Delta region, Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

This research draws on transformational leadership theory initiated by Burns (1978) and expanded by Bass (1985). It was conducted through a multi-method case study approach at 13 public and 4 academic libraries in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Data collection consisted of an online survey with 162 responses and 23 in-depth semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Research result indicates that staff recruitment for managerial positions in Vietnamese libraries is mainly from within the organisation. Staff retention relies on differing factors, of which salary was considered the most important by several participants. However, succession planning itself may be a good way to keep qualified employees who would like to be promoted. For those employees attracted by high salaries rather than future managerial positions, supplemental income is believed to be a possible solution.

Research limitations/implications

A larger research coverage will be suggested to further research, so as to get further information about staff recruitment and how to retain qualified staff in Vietnamese library settings.

Practical implications

This study aims to benefit library leaders by providing good insights into which recruitment source is suitable to look for qualified staff for managerial positions in Vietnam. Most importantly, the research would inform library leaders and the local government in the Mekong Delta of the possible reasons for staff turnover. This study also helps to raise library leaders’ awareness of how to retain their qualified professional employees within a highly dynamic environment.

Originality/value

This research contributes to literature about qualified staff recruitment and retention in an Asian country context, which has not been discussed so far. It also helps to raise awareness of library leaders about applying some practical strategies, including succession planning, into retaining managing employees in their organisations.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Kène Henkens, Chantal Remery and Joop Schippers

During recent years, the Dutch labour market has developed from a buyers' market into a sellers' market. Consequently employers had to increase their efforts to find…

Abstract

Purpose

During recent years, the Dutch labour market has developed from a buyers' market into a sellers' market. Consequently employers had to increase their efforts to find suitable staff. This paper aims to analyse the instruments employers use to contact with potential workers. To what extent do employers still rely on traditional means like advertisements in the paper or do they behave more actively, using the world wide web, visiting job fares et cetera.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey among more than 1,000 employers in The Netherlands. Factor analyses and regression analyses are carried out to explain different recruitment strategies.

Findings

The factor analyses show that the different recruitment methods can be traced back to three recruitment strategies. The first strategy was described as active and informal recruitment. The second strategy was called recruiting via the internet and the third is characterised by formal recruitment. The results suggest that many organisations – not in the least organisations in the local government sector – could gain a great deal from using a wider range of instruments to recruit new personnel.

Originality/value

The paper analyses the instruments used by employers in search for potential workers.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

David Farnham and Amanda Stevens

This article reports and evaluates how a traditional approach to recruitment and selection in the Social Services Department of West Sussex County Council was superseded…

Abstract

This article reports and evaluates how a traditional approach to recruitment and selection in the Social Services Department of West Sussex County Council was superseded by a competency‐based approach. The authors discuss the impacts of external and internal changes on the local authority and the need to develop less subjective and more effective methods of recruitment and selection, at all levels. After describing and reviewing existing practices, they outline the results of an internal research investigation involving managers and personnel and training specialists. The research participants acknowledged the limitations of the existing recruitment and selection practices and recognised the need for a more competence‐based approach. This was clearly an important stage in the change process which the authors proceed to describe. Here, they highlight the key role of training and relationship‐building between line managers and personnel specialists. Examples are provided of traditional and competence‐based job descriptions, person specifications and forms of assessment. The authors conclude that the new system fits well into the department’s overall human resources strategy for improving workplace performance and reducing workplace conflict.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Vathsala Wickramasinghe

This paper seeks to present and discuss the findings of a study of staffing practices in the Sri Lankan private sector with particular reference to junior level managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present and discuss the findings of a study of staffing practices in the Sri Lankan private sector with particular reference to junior level managerial jobs. The scope of staffing practices consisted of six major areas, namely the usage of information from job analysis in staffing, the sources of labour, selection criteria and selection methods in use, the validation of staffing practices and the involvement of HR managers and line managers in staffing.

Design/methodology/approach

Sixty‐two companies were selected based on a stratified random sample method from two major types of companies – those listed on the stock exchange and those not listed. A self‐administered questionnaire was chosen as the main mode for data collection. For the study, a combination of quantitative and qualitative inquiries was adopted.

Findings

Sri Lankan companies placed higher weighting on the external labour market in recruitment and the use of objective criteria in selection. The common ground for the companies is the heavy role that interviews, written examinations, psychometric tests and assessment centres play as selection methods.

Originality/value

The credibility of management concepts is partly determined by their diffusion across the world. Also, such credibility will be enhanced if the concepts are viewed to be applicable in different country contexts. However, staffing practices remain dubious due to the lack of empirical studies in the context of Asian developing countries. Specifically, no such studies have been conducted in the context of Sri Lanka.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Mamoun N. Akroush, Amjad A. Abu‐ElSamen, Ghazi A. Samawi and Abdelhadi L. Odetallah

The purpose of this paper is to examine an empirical model of internal marketing (IM) and internal service quality (ISQ) in tourism restaurants operating in Jordan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine an empirical model of internal marketing (IM) and internal service quality (ISQ) in tourism restaurants operating in Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured and self‐administered survey was employed targeting managers and employees of tourism restaurants operating in Jordan. A sample of 334 of tourism restaurants managers and employees were involved in the survey. A series of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to assess the research constructs dimensions, unidimensionality, validity and composite reliability. Structural path model analysis was also used to test the hypothesised interrelationships of the research model.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that IM consists of six dimensions: staff recruitment, staff training, internal communications, staff motivation, job security and staff retention. Staff recruitment, staff training, and internal communications positively and significantly affected staff motivation. Staff recruitment and internal communications positively and significantly affected ISQ. Staff motivation positively and significantly affected job security, and job security positively and significantly affected staff retention. Finally, staff retention has positively and significantly affected ISQ. Staff recruitment exerted the strongest effect on both staff motivation and ISQ.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, the authors examined only six components of IM that lead to ISQ; meanwhile other components could affect ISQ. There could also be other factors that affect the practice and components of IM and ISQ. This research has also examined the effect of IM and ISQ only. The potential effect of ISQ on business performance needs to be examined.

Practical implications

Tourism restaurants managers should have a holistic approach for IM and ISQ. Three dimensions of ISQ – reliability, assurance and empathy – loaded on one factor named “interaction quality”. This finding has important implications since it reveals that “internal customers” (employees) have “working needs” that should be met in order to meet and satisfy external customers’ needs. Managers and executives can benefit from the research findings while designing their IM and ISQ strategies to achieve long‐term organisational objectives.

Originality/value

This is the first research effort devoted to examining the interrelationships of IM and ISQ in tourism restaurants. Executives and managers can benefit from the research findings while designing their IM and ISQ strategies to achieve long‐term organisational objectives. International tourism organisations planning to expand their operations Jordan's tourism industry have now valuable empirical evidence regarding two important concepts in this industry – IM and ISQ.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Tone Lindheim

The aim of this study is to investigate why many immigrants end up in uncertain employment.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate why many immigrants end up in uncertain employment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes a qualitative case study of three nursing homes in Oslo (Norway), which investigates immigrant employment and recruitment-related practices. Practice theory is used as the theoretical and methodological framework. The study takes an ethnographic approach and combines participant observation, semi-structured shadowing, qualitative interviews and document review.

Findings

The recruitment practice, as it is accomplished, is different from the practice that is prescribed in the formal recruitment policy. The configuration of the recruitment-related practices locks in the recruitment practice and reproduces the social order. The net effect of the recruitment-related practices is that immigrant employees remain in uncertain employment.

Research limitations/implications

A practice-theoretical approach, analyzing organizational practices as they are accomplished in space and time and not as isolated activities defined by their purpose, provides a richer understanding of the complexity and connectedness of organizational practices. Combining practice theory and institutional perspectives, the paper demonstrates how normative and regulative mediators order and align related practices. The study demonstrates the importance of examining the configuration of practices to understand how the net effect of related practices affects those who dwell in them, in this case immigrants pursuing secure and stable employment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the field of diversity management by using practice theory to explain why measures for enhancing immigrant employment may not have the intended effect because they are interwoven in a nexus of practices with conflicting interests that (un)intentionally undermine the measures.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Rita Bissola and Barbara Imperatori

The aim of this chapter is to explore employee behaviors and expectations of the role of social media when searching for jobs, to offer recruiters and companies valuable…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this chapter is to explore employee behaviors and expectations of the role of social media when searching for jobs, to offer recruiters and companies valuable insights to design and manage appropriate web-based employer branding and recruitment strategies.

Methodology

The research strategy is based on semi-structured in-depth interviews involving 34 central informants: talented Gen Yers and social media recruitment experts and mangers. The project focuses on the Italian context, an exemplary country with the highest social media penetration rate.

Findings

The results demonstrate the “bounded” popularity of social media as a recruitment tool among Gen Yers who implement up to five active and passive behaviors, albeit not all widespread, according to varying patterns and using different social media for different purposes: receiving, seeking, sharing, leading, and experiencing. Gen Yers, with aims that vary in line with various staffing phases, collect and share rumors and voices from both internal and controlled organizational sources but also, and above all, from external and organizational sources that companies do not control directly.

Practical implications

Social media seem to offer appealing and valuable opportunities to attract and engage talented young individuals, sustaining the quality, quantity, and fairness of employment relationships. Conversely, they also involve some organizational risks and costs. The chapter offers some managerial cautions and advocates a radical change in the prevalent HRM mindset for the improved management of transparency that social media solutions entail.

Originality/value

Results contribute in understanding how social media can better sustain employer branding and recruitment activities, especially considering the needs and expectations of talented young employees and professionals in the Italian context. Italy is an emblematic context, where the social media potential appears to be extremely interesting, considering its high rate of social media penetration.

Details

Social Media in Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-901-0

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 19000