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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Samuel Leon Rohr

The purpose of this paper is to show managers can effectively utilize a job description throughout an employee's tenure. Typically, a job description is used in the hiring…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show managers can effectively utilize a job description throughout an employee's tenure. Typically, a job description is used in the hiring process. However, a job description can be utilized in recruiting and selection, compensation, evaluation, training and development, health and safety, and succession planning.

Design/methodology/approach

The author approached the use of a job description from a manager’s perspective. Using both existing literature and conceptual usage of a job description, the author provides a potential use of a job description to improve the human resource competitiveness of an organization.

Findings

If utilized throughout the life of employment, a job description is a powerful tool that can aid managers. Managers have a road map that can help them with their duties of planning, leading, organizing, controlling and staffing. With a road map, the complexities of management become easier.

Research Limitations/implications

The limitations involve actual data that prove the effectiveness of the job description. Most of the information provided in the article is theoretical but potentially provides practical information for practitioners.

Practical implications

The article provides a practical application of the use of a job description. The information provided can be utilized immediately by practitioners. Specifically, inexperienced managers can use the job description as a road map for supervising an employee through the employment relationship.

Social implications

Unfortunately, there are very little social implications. However, whenever organizations can improve their relationships with their employees, society will surely benefit.

Originality/value

The article presented involves pieces of previous works, but to date, the author could not find another example of the total use of the job description through the employment relationship. Therefore, it appears to be very original in application.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Beáta Sz. G. Pató

The purpose of this paper is to present the possibilities of formal and structural appearances of a job description, with correct content, through corporate examples and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the possibilities of formal and structural appearances of a job description, with correct content, through corporate examples and the result of a research.

Design/methodology/approach

The author in this paper aims to demonstrate the possibilities of the design of job descriptions, based on more than ten-year-long, intense, empirical research of job descriptions (cca. 1,200 examined and analyzed items).

Findings

During the research work, a 2D job description sample has been created, mapped from a 3D job description, based on an earlier research. This 2D sample can serve as a good starting point for companies in the creation of new documents. Furthermore, the process of the formal visualization of job descriptions has been described, and structured and semi-structured formal visualization have been illustrated, with corporate examples.

Research limitations/implications

A well-visualized job description can lead the employee, the employer and the company as well to comprehension and competence, thus job descriptions become one of the tools of HRD visual management.

Practical implications

The aim is to support the job description writing process, which therefore will lead to a well-formed and well-structured, attractive, “living” document.

Originality/value

The form and content of a job description, the aims that it serves and the message it conveys really make a difference. 3D job descriptions are under patent design protection in Hungary (Registration Number: 90 806 D0500121).

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Saul Carliner, Chantal Castonguay, Emily Sheepy, Ofelia Ribeiro, Hiba Sabri, Chantal Saylor and Andre Valle

This study aims to explore the competencies needed by performance consultants, a particular role identified for training and development professionals. The role was…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the competencies needed by performance consultants, a particular role identified for training and development professionals. The role was formally named and promoted nearly two decades ago. Two ongoing discussions in the field are the competencies needed by training and development professionals and the role of consulting within the field.

Design/methodology/approach

This study identifies the general competencies needed by a performance consultant as reflected in job descriptions for the position. It accomplished this goal by collecting job descriptions for the position from organizations in Canada (the result of a practical arrangement with an organization that would collect the descriptions and remove identifying information before the research team analyzed them), systematically analyzing them using qualitative content analysis techniques and generating a profile of the position, which can be used as a basis for further analysis of the position.

Findings

The job title and competencies sought in the job descriptions differ from those proposed in the literature. Specific areas of difference include the title (none of the job descriptions analyzed explicitly used the title performance consultant), role in needs analysis and client relationships, technology competence (the job descriptions sought little, if any, while the literature suggests broad conceptual knowledge) and qualifications (most job descriptions only require a bachelor’s degree; many training and development professionals have more education).

Research limitations/implications

The profile presented in this paper only represents that used in job descriptions (typically an idealized version) and in a particular national context. But if the results are validated with other methodologies and in other contexts, they suggest that the actual consulting role significantly differs from the one conceptualized in the literature.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the consultant role conceived in the literature differs from the actual job expected by employers, at least as reflected in job descriptions. Research with incumbents in the job is needed to assess whether the inconsistencies are also reflected in the day-to-day work.

Social implications

Social implications validate the broad concern that trainers have skills and talents to offer organizations that those organizations do not fully utilize.

Originality/value

The paper provides one of the few empirical studies of the job responsibilities of a performance consultant.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2017

Yuna Kim and John S. Talbott

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether communicating recent changes in the sales profession, shifting from a performance-focused model to a customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether communicating recent changes in the sales profession, shifting from a performance-focused model to a customer need-focused model, to job candidates by re-labeling job descriptions can increase job candidates’ interest in pursuing sales jobs.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments using job candidates (undergraduate business students) were conducted at two public US universities to examine: whether job candidates use job title or job description to determine their interest in pursuing jobs and whether terminology used in the job description affects job candidates’ interest in pursuing sales jobs.

Findings

Results show that job candidates’ interest in pursuing jobs are affected by job titles more than the actual job responsibilities. Further, job candidates’ interest in pursuing sales jobs is affected by terminology used in the job descriptions, where customer need-focused (selling-focused) terminology increases (decreases) interest in pursuing a sales job.

Practical implications

Sales jobs have been recognized as one of the hardest job positions to fill. Results from this paper can help recruiters develop effective strategies to improve job candidates’ interest in pursuing sales jobs, especially the emerging social selling jobs.

Originality/value

Contrary to most extant research that investigates resistance toward sales jobs by examining job candidates’ idiosyncratic characteristics, this paper adopts a branding and consumer learning perspective and examines how job candidates’ interest in pursuing a job is influenced by their ability or willingness to process job information.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Kathy Pennell

The purpose of this paper is to examine the idea that flexible job descriptions are vital options that would allow library managers the latitude necessary to promote…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the idea that flexible job descriptions are vital options that would allow library managers the latitude necessary to promote developmental opportunities in library succession management plans.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses supportive literature from both within and outside librarianship to examine the impact flexible job descriptions could have on the succession management process.

Findings

Traditionally, job descriptions have been constructed with a very narrow focus and could be construed to limit the ability to provide various opportunities for growth, particularly in a unionized environment. Flexible job descriptions may allow library managers more freedom in providing accelerated learning and development opportunities through a succession management program.

Originality/value

With the projected impending retirement of baby boomer library managers, libraries should explore the use of flexible job descriptions. Flexible job descriptions may aid in accelerating development opportunities for those employees who will fill the positions vacated by retiring managers.

Details

Library Management, vol. 31 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Bob Kieserman

Using a six‐step process, the purpose of this paper is to present some guidelines for preparing job descriptions for a library organization.

Abstract

Purpose

Using a six‐step process, the purpose of this paper is to present some guidelines for preparing job descriptions for a library organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the personal expertise of the author, who has been a library consultant to all types of libraries for over 15 years.

Findings

This paper suggests that before a job description can be written, the organization must first understand what kinds of jobs are necessary, then do a job analysis, and then go through a process that involves the employees who are to carry out the responsibilities of the particular job to help design the job and write the job description.

Originality/value

This paper helps the library director and the library department manager more intelligently approach the design of a job and more precisely document the scope of that job within the library organization.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Chi Ming Chow and Brian H. Kleiner

Briefly outlines why it is necessary to distinguish between marginal and essential job duties before providing definition for both. Covers the need for job analysis and…

Abstract

Briefly outlines why it is necessary to distinguish between marginal and essential job duties before providing definition for both. Covers the need for job analysis and the techniques which may be employed to assist line managers. Discusses the need for job descriptions and gives brief details of areas which such a description should include. Looks at the requirements of the American with Disabilities Act in relation to this subject.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

René Schmidt, Robin Bell and Vessela Warren

This research identifies the forms of tacit knowledge frequently requested in the job descriptions of knowledge workers in a multinational automotive manufacturer's…

Abstract

Purpose

This research identifies the forms of tacit knowledge frequently requested in the job descriptions of knowledge workers in a multinational automotive manufacturer's product development department. It then explores how and why the most requested forms of tacit knowledge are used in practice to achieve organizational goals.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a sequential mixed-methods approach to quantify the most frequently requested forms of tacit knowledge within internal job descriptions and then explores how and why this tacit knowledge is used. The first stage applies manifest content analysis to internal job descriptions to highlight the epitomes of tacit knowledge to identify the most frequently requested forms of tacit knowledge. The second stage employs semi-structured interviews to explore the use of the most frequently requested forms of tacit knowledge in practice.

Findings

The research indicated that the organization most frequently requested tacit knowledge in the form of skills and experience in the job descriptions of knowledge workers in the product development department. When the use and application of tacit knowledge in the form of skills were further explored in practice, it was found that tacit knowledge-based socially-focused skills were used, which was underpinned by the need to bring people together and align them towards a common goal to make things work; by enabling people to work together as a team; by developing and using networks; and acting as a required resource to support the development and integration in product development. Tacit knowledge in the form of experience was applied through the application of personally obtained experience to enhance development work by acting as a pacemaker for increasing efficiency and a sense of upcoming issues.

Originality/value

This work addresses the paucity of studies identifying tacit knowledge in large organizations and meets calls to investigate the processes and activities related to tacit knowledge in specific contexts.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Consists of a series of nine articles under the same title. Each article provides a different slant on the hiring process. Outlines the legal position when hiring…

Abstract

Consists of a series of nine articles under the same title. Each article provides a different slant on the hiring process. Outlines the legal position when hiring employees and concentrates on providing a framework for managers. Covers areas including job analysis and descriptions, where to advertise and recruit, selection criteria, the interview, testing, negotiating the offer of employment and references. Briefly describes trends in employment practices and ways to minimize potential litigation through best practice.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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