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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2021

Elissa Tucker

The purpose of this APQC (American Productivity and Quality Center) research study is to understand which strategic workforce planning approaches are currently in use;…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this APQC (American Productivity and Quality Center) research study is to understand which strategic workforce planning approaches are currently in use; whether these approaches are meeting business needs; and what workforce planning challenges organizations are facing today.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved survey research with 236 valid respondents representing organizations from a wide range of industries, regions, workforce sizes and revenues. American productivity and quality center (APQC) identified 46 “best-in-class” workforce planners from among these organizations based on their consistent achievement of superior results from workforce planning.

Findings

Best-in-class workforce planners are doing more than closing skills gaps and reducing skills surpluses. They are optimizing talent. Leveraging technology, varied work arrangements and employee development, they assemble the optimal mix of talent to achieve business goals.

Originality/value

The findings provide insight into how best-in-class workforce planners build a strong foundation for effective workforce planning through the distinctive ways they use process, people, technology and time. Organizations that adopt the practices and approaches of best-in-class workforce planners can drive improvements in their own workforce planning process.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

J.A. Curson, M.E. Dell, R.A. Wilson, D.L. Bosworth and B. Baldauf

This paper sets out to disseminate new knowledge about workforce planning, a crucial health sector issue. The Health Select Committee criticised NHS England's failure to…

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6349

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to disseminate new knowledge about workforce planning, a crucial health sector issue. The Health Select Committee criticised NHS England's failure to develop and apply effective workforce planning. The Workforce Review Team (WRT) commissioned the Institute for Employment Research, Warwick University, to undertake a “rapid review” of global literature to identify good practice. A workforce planning overview, its theoretical principles, good practice exemplars are provided before discussing their application to healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review, undertaken September‐November 2007, determined the current workforce planning evidence within and outside health service provision and any consensus on successful workforce planning.

Findings

Much of the literature was descriptive and there was a lack of comparative or evaluative research‐based evidence to inform UK healthcare workforce planning. Workforce planning practices were similar in other countries.

Practical implications

There was no evidence to challenge current WRT approaches to NHS England workforce planning. There are a number of indications about how this might be extended and improved, given additional resources. The evidence‐base for workforce planning would be strengthened by robust and authoritative studies.

Originality/value

Systematic workforce planning is a key healthcare quality management element. This review highlights useful information that can be turned into knowledge by informed application to the NHS. Best practice in other sectors and other countries appears to warrant exploration.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Shila Monazam Ebrahimpour, Fariborz Rahimnia, Alireza Pooya and Morteza Pakdaman

Workforce planning must answer how many workforces, in which positions, and talents, and when each organization is needed. To find the requirements workforce

Abstract

Purpose

Workforce planning must answer how many workforces, in which positions, and talents, and when each organization is needed. To find the requirements workforce, organizations need to know the organizational position and talents pools. Clarifying the number of workforces required in each pool requires attention to workforce flows, including hiring, promotion, degradation, horizontal movement, and exiting the organization. It is a dynamic issue and must be addressed over several periods over a specific duration, which adds to the complexity. According to the talent management presented in this research, all the above complex questions are answered by applying the optimal control (OC) model according to talent management presented in this research.

Design/methodology/approach

This research presents a dynamic model by using a linear-quadratic optimal control model, which was solved by Pontryagin's maximum principle, to achieve an optimal number of workforce requirements for each of the positions of nursing services manager, supervisor, head nurses and nurses in the health sector according to the required talents in each position.

Findings

The results have shown that the target value of workforce numbers has been achieved in the planning period, and the validation test and sensitivity analysis justified the model by reaching the workforce planning targets.

Originality/value

This study provides a dynamic model for achieving quantitative workforce planning targets; the model presented in this manuscript has included an important qualitative factor, namely workforce talents. According to the authors' review, there is no comprehensive research devoted to workforce planning through optimal control models by attention to workforces skills.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Rhidian Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to identify and review the leadership challenges in workforce planning, paying special reference to adult social care primarily in England…

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228

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and review the leadership challenges in workforce planning, paying special reference to adult social care primarily in England (UK) whilst raising leadership issues that have international resonance.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint which presents a distillation of key issues, challenges and relevant literature spanning workforce planning, human resources and social care.

Findings

The paper finds that growing demands on services, rising expectations for personalised care and support, together with the provision of safe and effective joined up care are some of the key drivers facing social care and wider public services. Leaders need to ensure a robust data and evidence base, sound interpretation of intelligence as well as building integrated approaches to workforce planning both within and between services.

Practical implications

Workforce leadership provides the bedrock to ensuring social care builds the workforce required for the future. As services undergo redesign and transformation the workforce planning task is more important now than ever and is a key responsibility for every organisation's leadership, including chief executives, commissioners and workforce specialists.

Originality/value

Workforce planning in social care is afforded relatively little attention and the analysis presented in this paper provides the stimulus for debate.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Judy Stokker and Gillian Hallam

The paper aims to describe a workforceplanning model developed in‐house in an Australian university library that is based on rigorous environmental scanning of an…

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5032

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe a workforceplanning model developed in‐house in an Australian university library that is based on rigorous environmental scanning of an institution, the profession and the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study that describes the stages of the planning process undertaken to develop the Library's Workforce Plan and the documentation produced.

Findings

While it has been found that the process has had successful and productive outcomes, workforce planning is an ongoing process. To remain effective, the workforce plan needs to be reviewed annually in the context of the library's overall planning program. This is imperative if the plan is to remain current and to be regarded as a living document that will continue to guide library practice. Research limitations/implications – Although a single case study, the work has been contextualized within the wider research into workforce planning.

Practical implications

The paper provides a model that can easily be deployed within a library without external or specialist consultant skills, and due to its scalability can be applied at department or wider level.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the trends impacting on, and the emerging opportunities for, university libraries and provides a model for workforce planning that recognizes the context and culture of the organization as key drivers in determining workforce planning.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Annemarie Wille and Barry Nixon

New Zealand is not alone in facing challenges for the building and sustaining of a future health workforce that can meet the needs of a diverse population. In this…

Abstract

New Zealand is not alone in facing challenges for the building and sustaining of a future health workforce that can meet the needs of a diverse population. In this article, the author describes how New Zealand has begun to build on models developed from the UK and elsewhere to attend to workforce issues in the child and adolescent mental health and addictions sector. The workforce planning development model being implemented by the Werry Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health has a solid pedigree, with a very New Zealand focused process for implementation.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2007

Yvonne Anderson and Barry Nixon

This article will provide an overview of the national child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) workforce planning programme 2006‐7, which used early implementer…

Abstract

This article will provide an overview of the national child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) workforce planning programme 2006‐7, which used early implementer sites in each of the eight English regions to produce a specialist CAMHS workforce plan and explores the potential transferable learning from the CAMHS experience to workforce planning across a range of other settings.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Alireza Pooya, Morteza Pakdaman and Shila Monazam Ebrahimpour

This paper aims to present a continuous-time workforce planning model in which workforce flow occurs in terms of internal and external recruitment considering human…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a continuous-time workforce planning model in which workforce flow occurs in terms of internal and external recruitment considering human resource strategies (HRS). The proposed model is a linear optimal control model in which promotions occur by inside appointment and outside employment of the system considering a cost leadership or a differentiation strategy and whether organizations have an internal or an external recruitment orientation. In other words, in the model and its solution procedure, this paper could determine any arbitrary function for the demand of the workforce with each HRS.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model contains five main sections, namely, applicants, newcomers, workforce who are doing sensitive-simple jobs, expert workforce and supervisors (or managers) that have a different orientation in different HRS. Each of these sections has a target value that this paper tries to attain it by applying appropriate control variables, such as recruitment, layoff, degradation, promotion and retirement. To reach this purpose, this paper formulated an optimal control problem using a linear system transition equation with a quadratic cost function.

Findings

Based on the proposed model, it was found that the optimal control model can interpret the managerial aspects. This model could be useful for different firms with different types of workforce demands. This paper has tried to have a comprehensive view of different flows of the workforce in an organization that concern to workforce planning.

Originality/value

Despite the considerable amount of research published, and the importance of following a human resources strategy from organizational strategy, in the knowledge, there is no comprehensive study dedicated to human resources strategy and workforce planning by optimal control models for workforce planning.

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Donna Parsons

Illustrates how the NHS workforce‐review team looks at the area of medical workforce planning and some of the problems that planners face.

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1122

Abstract

Purpose

Illustrates how the NHS workforce‐review team looks at the area of medical workforce planning and some of the problems that planners face.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes a structure for workforce planning and examines some of the challenges workforce planners and those working in the human‐resources field face.

Findings

Argues that workforce planning is more than simply number crunching; it requires the application of both art and science skills.

Practical applications

Demonstrates how the workforce is calculated in terms of the need, demand and supply for the future.

Social implications

Highlights the important advantages, for individual organizations as well as for society as a whole, which can result from successful workforce planning.

Originality/value

Fills a gap in the literature about whether workforce planning is an art or science.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Robert Wagner, Svatopluk Hlavacka and Ljuba Bacharova

The study is an attempt to provide empirical evidence, in the context of acute hospital care, of the current human resource practices in the health sector of the Slovak…

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11265

Abstract

The study is an attempt to provide empirical evidence, in the context of acute hospital care, of the current human resource practices in the health sector of the Slovak Republic. Using a sample of 72 acute care hospitals the research explored the perceived functions, typical customers and priorities of hospital human resource departments, ownership of a workforce plan, and the relationships between ownership of a workforce plan and type of hospital, as well as the degree to which different human resource activities are given priority. Cross‐tabulation procedure revealed statistically significant relationships between ownership of a workforce plan and the degree of priority given to having a quick, efficient and cost‐effective recruitment and selection system and, not surprisingly, the degree of priority given to ensuring that the human resource department has a workforce plan. The study evidence also indicates that, although the human resource staff in hospitals seem to be aware of their role in assisting hospital management in decision making, the human resource function in the Slovak hospitals still rather resembles that of a personnel administration than that of an important strategic human resource activity.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 14 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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