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Article

Karin Newman, Uvanney Maylor and Bal Chansarkar

This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study, based on interviews with over 130 nurses and midwives in four London Trust hospitals on: the main factors…

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study, based on interviews with over 130 nurses and midwives in four London Trust hospitals on: the main factors influencing nurse satisfaction and retention; empirical support for the robustness of a conceptual framework or model “the nurse satisfaction, service quality and nurse retention chain”; and some managerial considerations for recruitment and retention. The three main factors influencing job satisfaction were patients, the inherent characteristics of nursing and the nursing team; the two main sources of job dissatisfaction were staff shortages and poor management and amongst nurse retention strategies improving working conditions was more important than increased pay. For recruitment, as well as retention, improving the image and reputation of nursing along with improvements in work‐life balance were pre‐requisites for meeting the challenging target of an additional 20,000 nurses on the wards by 2004.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

Erik Beulen

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the contribution of a global IT service provider's Human Resources Information System (HRIS) to staff retention in emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the contribution of a global IT service provider's Human Resources Information System (HRIS) to staff retention in emerging markets. This includes a comparison of the relevant issues and implications derived from a study investigating six developing countries. The author of this paper concludes that the functionality of global HR systems should be supplemented with local adaptions in order to achieve the best support for staff retention management.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework for this paper is based on HR literature concerning staff retention and on the framework proposed by Martinsons for human resources management applications of knowledge‐based systems. The argument is illustrated by quotes from 16 semi‐structured expert interviews with Accenture HR executives and managers in Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Latvia and Slovakia.

Findings

HRISs contribute positively to staff retention for global IT service providers in emerging markets. Especially important in minimizing turnover is the support they can provide for the allocation of employees to international engagements, including scheduling and training. Culture and local labor market differences do of course influence the HR functionalities needed. This paper provides insight into the factors that necessitate local adaptions to a global HRIS.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the differences and similarities in a global IT service provider's staff retention management and the contribution of its HRIS – including global functionality and local adaptions – towards this goal in six developing countries.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Trang Thi Huynh

This paper aims to conduct an exploratory research of recruitment source and professional staff retention for succession planning, as well as suggests some experiences of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conduct an exploratory research of recruitment source and professional staff retention for succession planning, as well as suggests some experiences of keeping qualified staff in Vietnamese libraries. It stems from the context of academic and public libraries in the Mekong Delta region, Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

This research draws on transformational leadership theory initiated by Burns (1978) and expanded by Bass (1985). It was conducted through a multi-method case study approach at 13 public and 4 academic libraries in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Data collection consisted of an online survey with 162 responses and 23 in-depth semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Research result indicates that staff recruitment for managerial positions in Vietnamese libraries is mainly from within the organisation. Staff retention relies on differing factors, of which salary was considered the most important by several participants. However, succession planning itself may be a good way to keep qualified employees who would like to be promoted. For those employees attracted by high salaries rather than future managerial positions, supplemental income is believed to be a possible solution.

Research limitations/implications

A larger research coverage will be suggested to further research, so as to get further information about staff recruitment and how to retain qualified staff in Vietnamese library settings.

Practical implications

This study aims to benefit library leaders by providing good insights into which recruitment source is suitable to look for qualified staff for managerial positions in Vietnam. Most importantly, the research would inform library leaders and the local government in the Mekong Delta of the possible reasons for staff turnover. This study also helps to raise library leaders’ awareness of how to retain their qualified professional employees within a highly dynamic environment.

Originality/value

This research contributes to literature about qualified staff recruitment and retention in an Asian country context, which has not been discussed so far. It also helps to raise awareness of library leaders about applying some practical strategies, including succession planning, into retaining managing employees in their organisations.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article

Marilyn Spencer, Deniz Gevrek, Valrie Chambers and Randall Bowden

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a particular low marginal-cost employee benefit on employees’ intended retention and performance. By utilizing a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a particular low marginal-cost employee benefit on employees’ intended retention and performance. By utilizing a unique data set constructed by surveying full-time faculty and staff members at a public university in the USA, the authors study the impact of this employee benefit on faculty and staff performance and retention.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors focus on the impact of reduction in dependent college tuition at various levels on employees’ intentions to work harder and stay at their current job by using both OLS and ordered probit models. The authors also simulate the direct opportunity cost (reduction in revenue) in dollars and as a percent of total budgeted revenue to facilitate administrative decision making.

Findings

The results provide evidence that for institutions where employee retention and productivity are a priority, maximizing or offering dependent college tuition waiver may be a relatively low-cost benefit to increase retention and productivity. In addition, the amount of the tuition waiver, number of dependents and annual salary are statistically significant predictors of intended increased productivity and intent to stay employed at the current institution.

Originality/value

Employee retention and productivity is a challenge for all organizations. Although pay, benefits and organizational culture tend to be key indicators of job satisfaction, little attention is given to specific types of benefits. This study is the first comprehensive attempt to explore the relationship between the impact of this low-cost employee benefit and employee performance and retention in a higher education institution in the USA.

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Article

Mamoun N. Akroush, Amjad A. Abu‐ElSamen, Ghazi A. Samawi and Abdelhadi L. Odetallah

The purpose of this paper is to examine an empirical model of internal marketing (IM) and internal service quality (ISQ) in tourism restaurants operating in Jordan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine an empirical model of internal marketing (IM) and internal service quality (ISQ) in tourism restaurants operating in Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured and self‐administered survey was employed targeting managers and employees of tourism restaurants operating in Jordan. A sample of 334 of tourism restaurants managers and employees were involved in the survey. A series of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to assess the research constructs dimensions, unidimensionality, validity and composite reliability. Structural path model analysis was also used to test the hypothesised interrelationships of the research model.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that IM consists of six dimensions: staff recruitment, staff training, internal communications, staff motivation, job security and staff retention. Staff recruitment, staff training, and internal communications positively and significantly affected staff motivation. Staff recruitment and internal communications positively and significantly affected ISQ. Staff motivation positively and significantly affected job security, and job security positively and significantly affected staff retention. Finally, staff retention has positively and significantly affected ISQ. Staff recruitment exerted the strongest effect on both staff motivation and ISQ.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, the authors examined only six components of IM that lead to ISQ; meanwhile other components could affect ISQ. There could also be other factors that affect the practice and components of IM and ISQ. This research has also examined the effect of IM and ISQ only. The potential effect of ISQ on business performance needs to be examined.

Practical implications

Tourism restaurants managers should have a holistic approach for IM and ISQ. Three dimensions of ISQ – reliability, assurance and empathy – loaded on one factor named “interaction quality”. This finding has important implications since it reveals that “internal customers” (employees) have “working needs” that should be met in order to meet and satisfy external customers’ needs. Managers and executives can benefit from the research findings while designing their IM and ISQ strategies to achieve long‐term organisational objectives.

Originality/value

This is the first research effort devoted to examining the interrelationships of IM and ISQ in tourism restaurants. Executives and managers can benefit from the research findings while designing their IM and ISQ strategies to achieve long‐term organisational objectives. International tourism organisations planning to expand their operations Jordan's tourism industry have now valuable empirical evidence regarding two important concepts in this industry – IM and ISQ.

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Article

Stephen Taylor

This article explores the relationship, in the contemporary UK context, between employee retention and the provision by employers of occupational pension schemes. Several…

Abstract

This article explores the relationship, in the contemporary UK context, between employee retention and the provision by employers of occupational pension schemes. Several sources of literature are drawn on to develop cases for and against the proposition that pensions play a discernible role in reducing employee turnover. Original research carried out by the author is then presented which suggests that the retention effect is limited in terms of both its potency and its extent. A particular finding is the varying importance of pension schemes in terms of the retention of different staff groups.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Margaret Deery and Leo Jago

This paper aims to examine the themes of talent management, work-life balance (WLB) and retention strategies in the hospitality industry. The study was undertaken through…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the themes of talent management, work-life balance (WLB) and retention strategies in the hospitality industry. The study was undertaken through an analysis of the key themes in the most recent literature. The paper uses a framework incorporating organisational and industry attributes, personal employee dimensions, work-life conflict and organisational strategies and examines these in relation to whether job satisfaction, organisational commitment and employee retention improve.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses employee turnover literature to underpin a discussion of successful talent management. Using a key word search in both the hospitality literature and more mainstream management research, it divides the literature into four themes, namely, employee attitudes, personal employee dimensions, WLB and organisational strategies for employee retention.

Findings

The key findings emerging from this examination of the literature show that WLB appears to have become one of the key variables when addressing issues of employee management and retention. In the recent literature, the link between employee attitudes, such as job satisfaction and organisational commitment, personal dimensions, such as stress and alcohol abuse, and WLB have become closer and intertwined. These links assist in gaining more focussed strategies to assist in retaining talented staff.

Research limitations/implications

The meta-analysis of relevant literature provides an understanding of recent thinking in the area of WLB, talent management and the retention of talented staff. The article reframes the key issues in light of changes in the work environment and presents a new framework for future research and industry application.

Practical implications

Given that WLB has become such an important factor, it is critical that managers regularly monitor the levels of WLB being experienced by staff. As staff are not always aware of WLB being a problem until it is too late, managers will need to find appropriate methods for assessing the presence of problems in this area.

Social implications

The development of WLB strategies within the hospitality industry will assist in providing a healthier lifestyle for employees. This will then positively impact on family and social relationships.

Originality/value

The meta-analysis of relevant literature provides an understanding of recent thinking in the area of WLB, talent management and the retention of talented staff. The article reframes the key issues in light of changes in the work environment and presents a new framework for future research and industry application.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Andrew Martin, Deirdre Mactaggart and Jiaolan Bowden

The primary objective of this study was to examine, from the supervisors/managers' perspective, the impacting factors and barriers on their recruitment and retention in…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of this study was to examine, from the supervisors/managers' perspective, the impacting factors and barriers on their recruitment and retention in the Scottish tourism industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The information in this analysis was elicited from a questionnaire survey and analysed using factor analysis and significance test.

Findings

The analysis of the responses supports the separation of the hygiene (such as “working conditions”) and motivator factors (such as “image of the tourism industry” and “development opportunities”) as represented by Herzberg's dual‐factor motivational theory; and strengthens the belief that the latter is more significant in the recruitment and retention of tourism managerial staff.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation is the sampling framework and the data collection methods. These restricted the choice of the analysing techniques and might ultimately affect the interpretation of the research results.

Practical implications

This research aims to alert policy‐makers to some of the key barriers to the employment of qualified tourism staff in Scotland and assist with their decision‐making process.

Originality/value

As highlighted, the research provides insights to tourism practitioners in understanding and tackling the problems facing tourism employment in Scotland; it also provides some empirical evidence to tourism researchers in their theoretical understanding of the motivation and satisfaction of tourism managerial staff.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Bob Usherwood, Richard Proctor, Gordon Bower, Tony Stevens and Carol Coe

Reports the first stage of an investigation into the public library workforce in the UK. The investigation consisted of a postal survey of all UK public library…

Abstract

Reports the first stage of an investigation into the public library workforce in the UK. The investigation consisted of a postal survey of all UK public library authorities and had an 80 per cent response rate. Information and data were collected concerning recruitment and retention. The results indicate a high level of variation in attitudes and practices. There is evidence that some authorities that have career development initiatives are twice as likely to be actively recruiting candidates, and a statistically significant relationship between the length of stay of new professionals and ongoing career development. There is evidence of a new trend in recruitment which emphasises specific qualities, skills and abilities which candidates offer, rather than possession of a single qualification. It was found that there is staff retention by default.

Details

Library Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article

Stephen O'Kell

This article is based on a project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (O'Kell, 2002), which has been undertaken to provide a snapshot of the issues affecting the…

Abstract

This article is based on a project funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (O'Kell, 2002), which has been undertaken to provide a snapshot of the issues affecting the independent care home sector at the present time, prior to the introduction of the National Minimum Standards for care homes in April 2002. A range of issues relating to care staff recruitment and retention are reviewed and good practice is highlighted.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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