Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Terry Moreton

Examines the role of “sheltered employment” within themacro‐economic labour market. Assesses the extent to which shelteredemployment is an end in itself forming a “road…

Abstract

Examines the role of “sheltered employment” within the macro‐economic labour market. Assesses the extent to which sheltered employment is an end in itself forming a “road block” for people with disabilities. Goes on to suggest ways in which the system of sheltered employment might be modified to form a set of agencies with the key objective of facilitating the successful “transition” of people with disabilities from “sheltered” into “open” employment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Wim Van Opstal, Eva Deraedt and Caroline Gijselinckx

The sector of work integration social enterprises (WISEs) has grown considerably all across Europe during the last few decades. Unfortunately, many governments do not have…

Abstract

Purpose

The sector of work integration social enterprises (WISEs) has grown considerably all across Europe during the last few decades. Unfortunately, many governments do not have a clear sight on the profile of WISEs they are supporting. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed profile of WISEs in Flanders and identify shifts and differences within and between WISE work forms.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are utilized from a newly designed monitoring instrument to capture the profile of WISEs in Flanders (Belgium). This paper discusses some methodological issues in using administrative data to monitor this sector, and present a profile at the enterprise level and at the worker level. Parametric and nonparametric tests are applied to assess the significance of profile shifts and differences within this sector.

Findings

One of the dominant features of the analysis has been the identification of profound differences that can be observed between the work forms and the slighter differences that are observed within the work forms while comparing start‐ups to their mature counterparts. Therefore, it might be concluded that the policy framework on the social insertion economy as it currently exists in Flanders has a strong regulative impact on the WISEs in Flanders. This impact translates itself through differences in the profile of enterprises, as well as differences in the profile of the target group workers they employ.

Originality/value

A dataset combining administrative data are created to estimate enterprise and target group worker profiles in this sector. The discussion on methodological aspects involved contributes to the literature on monitoring this sector.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Gemma Bend and Sandra Fielden

This paper aims to contribute to prior gender-based conceptual models within organisational and management studies by incorporating an additional lens of disability. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to prior gender-based conceptual models within organisational and management studies by incorporating an additional lens of disability. The authors present a context specific and embodied based model that we call the “two-way mirror effect” which accounts for the environmental and discursive effects of gender and disability within the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews existing literature on gender, disability and employment and uses that literature to construct and support the concept of a two-way mirror effect.

Findings

By drawing on organisation and management-based studies, the authors have shown how previous models do not currently account for the experiences of disabled women within the workplace. Disabled workers, and especially disabled women face a myriad of unique barriers, including masculine and able-bodied employment practices (e.g. performative expectations) and exclusionary physical spaces (e.g. access, location to required facilities), that exclude them from full employment participation.

Practical implications

The review of existing literature and conceptual models reveal the gaps in research that academics and practitioners can build upon and the paper identifies the dominant norms that are embedded within organisational practices, which can be challenged to promote inclusion and equality.

Originality/value

The authors present a new intersectional-based conceptual model to fill a gap in organisational and management-based studies that accounts for the unique employment experiences of disabled employees, specifically disabled women.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Pavel Novák, Kateřina Lintymerová and Fokus Praha

The city of Prague has become a popular tourist attraction in recent years, and many people will also recall the disastrous floods that submerged part of the city in the…

Abstract

The city of Prague has become a popular tourist attraction in recent years, and many people will also recall the disastrous floods that submerged part of the city in the summer of 2002. There is another story that is worth telling: the history of Fokus and its mental health work that has burgeoned since the Velvet Revolution of 1989. People at Fokus seem to have an insatiable appetite for development and are constantly learning, adapting and innovating. Here, Pavel Novák and Kateřina Lintymerová describe some of the progress that has been made over the past two years, and take time to reflect on what they have learned.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Sarah Fotheringham and Chad Saunders

– The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of social enterprise as a strategy for poverty reduction for women.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of social enterprise as a strategy for poverty reduction for women.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature synthesis on the topic was conducted and patterns, linkages and gaps were examined among key themes to identify how social enterprise can potentially serve as a poverty reduction strategy for women.

Findings

The paper presents the findings in terms of specific factors contributing to women’s poverty and hypothesizes mechanisms through which social enterprises can mitigate or address these factors in practice. The paper organizes these findings in an integrative framework that highlights the need to ensure a solid policy foundation is in place before a number of key support mechanisms are enabled, which then facilitate specific types of work that can then grow in a sustainable manner.

Research limitations/implications

While the mechanisms and proposed framework are based on the extant literature, additional empirical investigation is required.

Practical implications

Women are disproportionately burdened by poverty and the framework presented provides a very practical tool to guide the design of new or diagnosing existing social enterprises targeting poverty reduction for women.

Social implications

Without a strategic approach, the risk is either perpetuating the status quo, or worse, placing those women engaged in social enterprises in a worse financial and social position.

Originality/value

There is limited research on the poverty reducing role of social enterprise for women and the proposed mechanisms and integrative framework presented provide a means of synthesizing our current knowledge while providing the basis for future investigations.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Silvia Dorado

This chapter explores how hybrid organizations navigate the challenges (and opportunities) associated with advancing unconventional logic combinations. It draws from a…

Abstract

This chapter explores how hybrid organizations navigate the challenges (and opportunities) associated with advancing unconventional logic combinations. It draws from a study of the 180-year history of sheltered workshops in the United States. Sheltered workshops are hybrids that combine social and commercial logics to provide gainful employment to individuals with disabilities. This chapter theorizes a connection between the governance system – that is, country-based social norms and regulatory settlements – framing hybrids and the agency that allows them the discretion required to advance unconventional combinations. It introduces the term hybrid agency to describe this connection and identifies four types: upstream, midstream, downstream, and crosscurrent. Upstream agency draws from the entrepreneurial vision of charismatic founders. It allows hybrids the discretion to advance unconventional logic combinations in unsupportive times, but it also requires them to observe certain dominant cultural norms. Midstream agency draws from hybrids’ adaptation and advocacy skills and resources in periods of historical change. It allows access to resources and legitimacy for unconventional combinations. Downstream agency draws from organizational slack possible in supportive times. Slack eases tensions and tradeoffs between conflicting logics but may also fuel mission drift. Finally, crosscurrent agency also draws from hybrids’ adaptation and advocacy skills and resources. It provides hybrids with the opportunity to grapple with challenges in periods of contestation.

Details

Organizational Hybridity: Perspectives, Processes, Promises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-355-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Mercedes Hernández Núñez-Polo, María-Concepción Alonso-Rodríguez, Ana Dolado, José-Luis Ayuso-Mateos and Almudena Martorell

Anxiety disorder is a common mental health problem in people with intellectual disabilities. Although this affects their quality of life, in Spain, there are no validated…

Abstract

Purpose

Anxiety disorder is a common mental health problem in people with intellectual disabilities. Although this affects their quality of life, in Spain, there are no validated tools to evaluate the symptomatology of anxiety in people with intellectual disabilities. The aim of this study is to validate the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with an intellectual disability (GAS-ID) in the Spanish population.

Design/methodology/approach

The Spanish version of the GAS-ID was produced by back translation and was administered to 120 adults with intellectual disabilities. The psychometric analyses included internal consistency using the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, inter-rater and test-retest reliability were determined using intra class correlation and Pearson correlation coefficients and, finally, factor analysis with Varimax rotation to confirm the construct validity of the questionnaire.

Findings

Cronbach’s alpha was 0.86 for the overall questionnaire. The intraclass correlation coefficient showed a good level of agreement in both test-retest (0.90) and inter-rater (0.91) analysis and the Pearson correlation showed a good significance in all dimensions and in the total scale. Varimax rotation factor analysis revealed four well-defined factors.

Originality/value

The GAS-ID is a feasible and reliable instrument for assessing anxiety symptoms in adults with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities, offering better diagnoses and therefore a more accurate treatment for the Spanish population with intellectual disabilities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 15 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Anton Neumann

In common with many other agencies, Richmond Fellowship Employment and Training has been grappling with the problem of how to modernise its sheltered workshops to meet the…

Abstract

In common with many other agencies, Richmond Fellowship Employment and Training has been grappling with the problem of how to modernise its sheltered workshops to meet the changing employment and training needs of clients. A further complication is how to make these changes while continuing to provide services for people who are unlikely ever to cope with open employment. Anton Neumann describes how RFET is managing this difficult balancing act, and the obstacles they encountered on the way.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Lindsay Barker, Stephen Cheung and Petrus Ng

The issues discussed in this article will be familiar to everyone struggling to deinstitutionalise sheltered workshops. The solutions being developed — social firms…

Abstract

The issues discussed in this article will be familiar to everyone struggling to deinstitutionalise sheltered workshops. The solutions being developed — social firms, supported employment — are also well known. But can they flourish in the very special situation of the new Hong Kong? Now part of the People's Republic of China, the former colony is still sitting between East and West, capitalism and communism, and is also in the throes of a very sharp recession. Lindsay Barker, Stephen Cheung and Petrus Ng tell the story so far and then look at what the future might hold for this fledgling revolution. Bob Grove

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Judith Ann Chapman

This article presents a framework for planned change processes that are transformational in nature. The framework provides a clear alternative to traditional approaches in…

Abstract

This article presents a framework for planned change processes that are transformational in nature. The framework provides a clear alternative to traditional approaches in organisation development (OD) which are generally suited to situations where smaller scale or incremental adjustments are required. It is structured around three core issues in organisational change management: the nature of organisations and what constitutes an improvement to them, appropriate strategies for levering change, and change agent roles. In the framework, special emphasis is placed on attitudes, beliefs and values as the key change levers in an organisational transformation. The usefulness and power of the framework are illustrated by a case analysis of a successful intervention involving over 50 consultants and a large number of organisations. The article concludes with a discussion of processes supportive of successful transformational change.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000