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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Ingrid Walker

Critical drug studies have developed a significant body of work that illuminates understanding of gender and drug use as well as drug pleasures. However, framing the study…

Abstract

Critical drug studies have developed a significant body of work that illuminates understanding of gender and drug use as well as drug pleasures. However, framing the study of women and their drug pleasures through critical drug studies presents potential limitations. The posthuman turn de-emphasises the primary goal of drug use: a particular subjective experience. Both the language and theoretical frameworks of new materialism potentially distance researchers, as interlocutors, from engaging the human experience of drug pleasures, rendering drug use abstract and unknowable.

In a historical context in which women’s intoxication has invoked shaming and criminalisation, control of their bodies, and silencing of dissent, scholarly activism by and inclusion of women who use drugs should be foundational to critical drug studies. Autoethnography offers a modality by which personal narrative becomes a convention of academic writing. It also presents a way of performing the self critically and authentically within conceptual frameworks that explore the complex, intersectional politics of women’s drug use, ways that are representationally missing in the scholarship. An ethics of care as part of one’s practice of the self proposes a radically different way of framing drug use. The recognition and normalisation of drug pleasures as the complicated, emergent, expressions of ethical self-care that they are for women (and all people who use drugs) promises fertile ground for future scholarly exploration. Research based in the lived experience of women who use drugs will help establish languages that resituate drug use in the phenomenology of their experience.

Details

The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Rong Liu, Jifei Wu and Grace Fang Yu-Buck

Drawing on self-determination theory, this paper compares the effects of QR code payment method (autonomous vs dependent payment) on payment pleasure, its mechanism and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on self-determination theory, this paper compares the effects of QR code payment method (autonomous vs dependent payment) on payment pleasure, its mechanism and the boundary condition in the mobile payment setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Four studies were conducted to examine the effect of QR code payment method on payment pleasure. In study 1, 108 undergraduate students were asked to recall a recent experience when they made either autonomous payment or dependent payment. Study 2 assigned 74 undergraduate students to either the autonomous or dependent payment. Study 3 replicated study 2, but recruited 75 customers in the field. For study 4, a total of 134 undergraduate students participated in a 2 (payment method: autonomous payment vs dependent payment) × 2 (product involvement: high vs low) between-subjects design.

Findings

The results of these four studies demonstrate that (1) customers derive more payment pleasure from autonomous payment, compared with dependent payments (study 1); (2) the sense of control mediates the effect of the payment method on payment pleasure (study 2 and study 3); and (3) product involvement moderates the mediating effect of the sense of control (study 4).

Originality/value

These findings contribute to the literature on mobile payment and payment experience. These findings also provide insight to merchants when they select an appropriate payment method and manage the customer payment experience.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Elizabeth Chiarello

The United States has an uncomfortable relationship with pleasure. Cultural ambivalence is evident in discourses surrounding pleasure and the labeling and treatment of…

Abstract

The United States has an uncomfortable relationship with pleasure. Cultural ambivalence is evident in discourses surrounding pleasure and the labeling and treatment of those who act on their desires. Pleasure seeking, generally understood in moral terms, is often medicalized and criminalized (as in the case of pregnancy prevention and drug use), placing questions of how to manage pleasure under the purview of medical and legal actors. At the macrolevel, institutions police pleasure via rules, patterns of action, and logics, while at the microlevel, frontline workers police pleasure via daily decisions about resource distribution. This chapter develops a sociolegal framework for understanding the social control of pleasure by analyzing how two institutions – medicine and criminal justice – police pleasure institutionally and interactionally. Conceptualizing medicine and criminal justice as paternalistic institutions acting as arbiters of morality, I demonstrate how these institutions address two cases of pleasure seeking – drug use and sex – by drawing examples from contemporary drug and reproductive health policy. Section one highlights shared institutional mechanisms of policing pleasure across medicine and criminal justice such as categorization, allocation of professional power, and the structuring of legitimate consequences for pleasure seeking. Section two demonstrates how frontline workers in each field act as moral gatekeepers as they interpret and construct institutional imperatives while exercising discretion about resource allocation in daily practice. The chapter concludes with a discussion of how understanding institutional and interactional policing of pleasure informs sociolegal scholarship about the relationships between medicine and criminal justice and the mechanisms by which institutions and frontline workers act as agents of social control.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-811-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Selim Aren, Hatice Nayman Hamamci and Safvan Özcan

The aim of this study, the moderating effect of pleasure-seeking and loss aversion, was investigated in relation to the big five personality traits with regard to risky…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study, the moderating effect of pleasure-seeking and loss aversion, was investigated in relation to the big five personality traits with regard to risky investment intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

In the study, the data was obtained between January and November 2019 via an online survey with convenience sampling. The total number of subjects is 886. The authors used IBM SPSS Statistics for analysis. Exploratory factor analysis, correlation analysis, regression analysis and discriminant analysis were performed.

Findings

Significant relationships were found between five personality traits and risky investment intentions. In these relationships, the moderator effect of pleasure-seeking for extraversion, conscientiousness and neuroticism personality traits was also determined. Besides, investment preferences for choosing “unknown and new investment” against “known and experienced investment”, which is a typical feature of the balloon periods, were modeled with big five personality traits and motivation variables (pleasure-seeking and loss aversion) and the equation was formed. As a result, high accuracy classification success was obtained.

Originality/value

The study is unique owing to its findings. In addition, general risk aversion and risky investment intention were investigated simultaneously to explain the different findings in the literature regarding the attitude of big five personality traits to risk and personality traits that show consistent approach were identified.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Jillian C. Sweeney and Fiona Wyber

This study extends the Mehrabian‐Russell environmental psychology model to include both emotional states and cognitive processing as mediators of the music‐intended…

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10018

Abstract

This study extends the Mehrabian‐Russell environmental psychology model to include both emotional states and cognitive processing as mediators of the music‐intended behavior relationship. Our model specifically suggests that music affects customers’ perceptions of service quality and merchandise quality as well as feelings of arousal and pleasure, in the context of a women’s fashion store. The effect of music on service quality has not previously received much attention. In addition, it has been suggested that previous results of studies examining the effect of music on consumer responses may have been largely the result of individual music tastes. In the present study, therefore, the effect of music tastes is also examined. Findings indicated that liking of music has a major effect on consumers’ evaluations (pleasure, arousal, service quality and merchandise quality), while the music characteristics (specifically slow pop or fast classical) have an additional effect on pleasure and service quality. Further, pleasure, service quality and merchandise quality affected intended approach behaviors, and arousal contributed to these behaviors when the store environment was considered pleasant. Affiliation behaviors similarly resulted from service quality, pleasure and arousal, but not merchandise quality. Overall results indicate the importance of understanding the effect of music on both consumers’ internal evaluations as well as intended behaviors.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Monica Mendini, Marta Pizzetti and Paula C. Peter

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and define social food pleasure as a new conceptual framework that can promote pleasurable and healthy food experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and define social food pleasure as a new conceptual framework that can promote pleasurable and healthy food experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing the literature related to food well-being and pleasure primarily from marketing and management fields and by looking at current trends appealing to food consumers and food enjoyers, the authors propose a new conceptual framework of social food pleasure.

Findings

The authors conceptualize social food pleasure as “the enjoyment derived from the acts of sharing food experiences offline, online, and for society at large, that positively contributes to consumers’ overall pleasure and satisfaction with consumer’s food consumption”. Moreover, the authors identify three key contexts of applications of social food pleasure. Sharing offline relates to the social activities that can help achieve pleasure with food. Sharing online concerns new media tools which allow for the connection between consumers and food to enhance food pleasure. Sharing for society considers the current pleasure of consumers derived from having a positive social experience based on food consumption.

Originality/value

By defining social food pleasure and proposing a conceptual framework of the three contexts of application, the authors advance the understanding of what constitutes pleasurable food experiences, connecting it to healthy food choices and well-being.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2018

Woo-Chul Cho, Kyung Young Lee and Sung-Byung Yang

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of whether smartwatches will survive and gain their own niche within the consumer electronics market. Based on the…

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1724

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of whether smartwatches will survive and gain their own niche within the consumer electronics market. Based on the stimulus–organism–response (S–O–R) framework, this study identifies and validates the impacts of both technological and fashion-related factors (interactivity, autonomy, visual aesthetics and self-expression) on product attachment towards smartwatches through user satisfaction and pleasure derived from their smartwatches.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected the survey data via online surveys from 198 respondents and tested measurement and structural models with the partial least square technique.

Findings

The authors found that both technological characteristics (interactivity and autonomy) and fashion-related characteristics (visual aesthetics and self-expression) have an impact on product attachment through pleasure.

Research limitations/implications

Several other important characteristics of traditional wrist-watches such as durability or workmanship are not considered in this study, but should be included in future studies. The three-item measure of autonomy may be insufficient for more sophisticated wearable devices in the future. In future studies, the impact of product attachment on users’ continued usage should be examined.

Practical implications

This study provides important practical implications for smartwatch makers interested in product development, as users were found to consider fashion-related characteristics to be as important as technological characteristics.

Originality/value

This study is the first study that considers both aesthetic and technological factors for IT acceptance in the context of wearable devices. Also, instead of traditional IT acceptance measures such as continued use, this study investigates users’ product attachment, which is more relevant to the case of wearable devices.

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2005

Hilde Corneliussen

Enthusiasm over technology is found among men. Or, at least, that is the impression we get from the main body of earlier research, which leaves us with an understanding of…

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368

Abstract

Enthusiasm over technology is found among men. Or, at least, that is the impression we get from the main body of earlier research, which leaves us with an understanding of men as computer enthusiasts, while women are more reluctant and ‘rational’ in their relation to the computer. In this paper I will argue that women do in fact enjoy working with computers. The empirical material is from a study of a group of students taking a computer course. We will meet women who enjoy working with computers, and explore how they express their pleasure in relation to the computer. Contrary to earlier claims that ‘computing is incompatible with being a girl’, we will find that many of the 21 women in this study are not afraid to articulate their pleasure in computing.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Carmen Antón, Carmen Camarero and Javier Rodríguez

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the adoption process of e-book readers and examine how the perception concerning the advantages of this technology and its…

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1294

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the adoption process of e-book readers and examine how the perception concerning the advantages of this technology and its incompatibility with consumer values determine the pleasure felt and its effective use. The authors also propose that consumer involvement with information and communication technologies (ICTs) moderates these effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical moderated regression analysis is used to test the proposed model with survey data from a sample of e-book reader owners.

Findings

Appraisal of the device’s reading features and the possibility for free downloading increases the pleasure found with its use and the extent to which it is actually used, whereas attachment to paper books decreases the emotional feeling, with some of these effects being moderated by the individual’s involvement with new ICTs. Pleasure mediates the influence of perceived advantages and attachment to the older technology on the use of the e-book reader device.

Practical implications

Two challenges to practitioners are suggested: to overcome the rejection of users who are less eager to experience pleasure and to use the e-reader, and to find the product’s objective or sensory characteristics that provide pleasure and promote long-lasting use.

Originality/value

The study extends previous studies on e-book readers by emphasizing the need to go beyond adoption intention. It analyzes effective use as a crucial measure of the true adoption of this technology and incorporates the perspective offered by the appraisal theory of emotion, which explains the key role of pleasure in this process.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Cheng Lu Wang and Ying Jiang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how consumers’ affective goal pursuit influences the relationship between their affect and satisfaction in services. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how consumers’ affective goal pursuit influences the relationship between their affect and satisfaction in services. In particular, it examines when affect can directly influence satisfaction and when such an impact is mediated by perceived service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This research explores consumers’ consumption goals in three different service contexts, i.e., a primarily pleasure-seeking hedonic service context, a primarily arousal-seeking hedonic service context and a utilitarian (non-affect-seeking) service context.

Findings

Results from two studies show that the primary affective consumption goal determines which specific affect can directly influence satisfaction. Other desirable non-primary affect influences satisfaction through the mediation of perceived service quality.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses on the service contexts in which consumers’ primary consumption goals vary. Further research may focus on the priority and strength of a consumer’s various consumption goals in different services and study how the priority and strength of different consumption goals determine how affect influences quality and satisfaction.

Practical implications

The study provides several insights for service providers and retailers to recognize that consumers’ primary consumption goals may vary in different service contexts, for different consumers, and even at different usage situations. Accordingly, marketers need to develop different strategies for consumer with different goal pursuit in services.

Originality/value

While the literature has documented that consumer affect influences consumer satisfaction in general, it is unclear how different consumption goals influence the impact of affect on satisfaction. This research contributes to the consumer goal literature by demonstrating the importance of primary consumption goals in the post-consumption evaluation of services.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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