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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Peter Jones, Colin Clarke‐Hill, Peter Shears and David Hillier

During the past five years consumer demand for organic food has risen dramatically in the wake of a series of high profile scares about food safety. This paper provides a…

Abstract

During the past five years consumer demand for organic food has risen dramatically in the wake of a series of high profile scares about food safety. This paper provides a case study of the retailing of organic foods. The case study includes an outline of the characteristics and development of the organic food market, an examination of the different players within the retail market place and a discussion of pricing, supply and marketing issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Ays¸e Özfer Özc¸elik and Asli Uçar

This study was planned and carried out among the academic staff working in Ankara (Turkey) in order to determine their perception of organic foods.

Abstract

Purpose

This study was planned and carried out among the academic staff working in Ankara (Turkey) in order to determine their perception of organic foods.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 240 academicians from three institutes at the Ankara University were selected to participate in the research. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire, in which a Likert type scale was used to determine the perception of organic foods. The institutes where the academic staff work are considered as the variables in the study (science, health sciences, and social sciences).

Findings

The research results indicated that there was a significant correlation between the institutes and academicians agreement with 12 statements in the survey questionnaire. Considering the institute variable, no significant difference was found in the organic foods perceptions of individuals from different institutes.

Originality/value

Organic products are widely on the market today. Consumer demand for organic foods has been steadily rising worldwide. Organic food consumption has slightly increased in Turkey in recent years, too. Still, many Turkish consumers do not have enough knowledge about organic foods yet. This study is valuable in that it explores at least some of the Turkish consumers' perception of organic foods whose consumption in the world is increasing fast.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

B. Beharrell and J.H. MacFie

The apparent conflict between what is scientifically known and whatis perceived concerning food acceptability by consumers provides aninteresting paradox. Some of the…

Abstract

The apparent conflict between what is scientifically known and what is perceived concerning food acceptability by consumers provides an interesting paradox. Some of the leading international contributions concerned with organic farming system food products are thus reviewed in the light of consumer beliefs and attitudes. It is concluded that, in a market economy, consumer opinion will gradually prevail and that agricultural farming systems will have to adjust to more extensive lower input farming approaches.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 93 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Annelies Verdurme, Xavier Gellynck and Jacques Viaene

The paper aims at investigating whether or not organic food consumers are automatically opposed to genetically modified (GM) food. Results from quantitative market…

Abstract

The paper aims at investigating whether or not organic food consumers are automatically opposed to genetically modified (GM) food. Results from quantitative market research indicate that this is not the case. Based on attitude towards GM food, three consumer segments are identified: the opponents; the proponents; and the neutrals. Only about 40 per cent of the organic consumers, namely the opponents, reject the use of genetic modification in organic food production. The neutrals are neither against nor in favour of GM food, while the proponents support GM in food production. Besides attitude towards GM food, the proponents differ from the other two segments in terms of beliefs, general attitudes and purchase intentions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Robert Connor and Lesley Douglas

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Mo Li and Hong-Jing Cui

This paper aims to examine the effect of face consciousness on purchase intention of organic food, to test whether this relationship would be moderated by purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of face consciousness on purchase intention of organic food, to test whether this relationship would be moderated by purchase situation (group vs individual) and advertising appeal (altruistic vs egoistic), and to explain the mediating role of perceived social value in these moderating effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Four between-subjects experiments were carried out (N = 123, N = 126, N = 130, N = 123) by using online questionnaires. Measured variables were introduced to assess participants' face consciousness, perceived social value and purchase intention. Two manipulated between-subjects variable were introduced to test how purchase situation (group vs individual) and advertising appeal (altruistic vs egoistic) moderates the relationship between face consciousness and purchase intention of organic food. SPSS Statistics 24 was used for the analysis of all experimental data.

Findings

Consumers with high face consciousness were more willing to buy organic food. Compared with the individual situation, face consciousness had a stronger impact on the purchase intention when the individual was in a group situation. Compared with egoistic appeals, face consciousness had a stronger impact on the purchase intention when the advertising appeal was altruistic. Perceived social value partly mediated the moderating effect of purchase situation and advertising appeal.

Originality/value

This study validates previous contributions on the effect of face consciousness on purchase intention of organic food and extends them by introducing two moderating variables. Additionally, it introduces perceived social value as a mediating variable to explain the mechanism of this effect.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Norazah Mohd Suki, Abdul Majeed and Norbayah Mohd Suki

This study aims to examine the impact of consumption values on consumers’ purchase of organic food and green environmental concerns. Additionally, the relationships…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of consumption values on consumers’ purchase of organic food and green environmental concerns. Additionally, the relationships between green environmental concerns and consumers’ purchase of organic food are investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 500 consumers with experience in purchasing organic food in Pakistan. The covariance-based structural equation modeling (CB-SEM) technique was used for the data analysis using the Analysis of Moments Structure software version 23. The CB-SEM technique allows for the simultaneous estimation of all relationships.

Findings

The CB-SEM technique reveals that of the 11 hypotheses tested, social value heavily influences consumers’ green environmental concerns. Moreover, consumers’ purchase of organic food is greatly impacted by conditional value. Consumers purchase organic food for their daily needs because they feel responsible for preserving and protecting the environment against global warming and its associated threats. This green purchasing behavior actually leads to better social approval, through its ability to impress others.

Practical implications

Organizations and business owners should address green environmental concerns by seriously applying organic methods in the process of production, processing, packaging and selling of organic food products. Such organic practices would enable organizations and business owners to produce organic food products that are free from chemicals.

Originality/value

The inclusion of consumption values strengthens the explanatory power of the proposed model in the context of Pakistani consumers’ purchase of organic food and green environmental concerns simultaneously. This study therefore adds new and substantial insights into the marketing theory.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Chandra Sekhar, Swati Krishna, Ghadeer G. Kayal and Nripendra P. Rana

This study's main objective is to investigate the influence of brand credibility on the intention to purchase organic food. In addition, this research studies the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study's main objective is to investigate the influence of brand credibility on the intention to purchase organic food. In addition, this research studies the moderating role of customer ethnocentricity as well as the mediating role of customer value.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore correlations between brand credibility and purchase intentions, cross-sectional data were collected from 433 Indian consumers. The data were analysed by structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings indicate that brand credibility is positively related to purchasing intention. The association between brand credibility and purchasing intentions is partially mediated by customer value. Customer ethnocentrism was also shown to have a negative moderation effect. Healthiness, high quality and sensory properties (i.e. natural taste) were found to be some of the most significant organic food characteristics, according to Indian consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The research is confined to India's geographical area, specifically the National Capital Regions.

Practical implications

To increase the purchase frequency of local or global branded organic food, businesses can include rational features in their marketing method such as the health benefits compared to the conventional product, a better emphasis on environmental safety and the social advantages of organic food.

Originality/value

This study develops an integrative model, including brand credibility (PBG & PBL), to predict organic food purchase intentions. This is an important contribution as, according to the results of the literature review, no previous studies have analysed these relationships.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Marija Radman

The market for organic products in Croatia is at the beginning of its development. There is no sufficient knowledge about organic consumers in Croatia. The objective of…

Abstract

Purpose of this paper

The market for organic products in Croatia is at the beginning of its development. There is no sufficient knowledge about organic consumers in Croatia. The objective of this paper is to gain knowledge about consumer attitudes toward organic products in the capital of Croatia.

Design/methodology/approach

The consumers’ attitudes were collected by means of a face‐to‐face survey. Attitudes, purchase frequency, supply satisfaction and beliefs about organic foods were studied with a sample of 179 consumers. The data obtained from the survey were analysed with univariate analysis, chi‐square test, ANOVA and correlation analysis.

Findings

Croatian consumers consider organically‐grown products as very healthy, of good quality and tasty. However, these products are perceived as rather expensive and of questionable appearance. Consumers are not very familiar with the supply of ecologically‐grown products in the market. Some groups of consumers have more positive attitudes toward organic products, and they exhibit an increased willingness to pay higher prices for these products. Therefore, marketing strategies for organic products should be targeted towards such groups.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this study is the choice of the sample. Further research is needed to discriminate between consumer groups, and to determine which segments are most appropriate for organic product marketing.

Practical implications

According to the research results an important task for the producers will be to increase consumers’ knowledge of what an organic product is and how to differentiate it in the marketplace.

Originality/value

This paper gives the first insight into buying behavior and attitudes of organic consumers in Zagreb. The results of the research could be used for planning further marketing activities.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Alok Tewari, Smriti Srivastava, Divya Gangwar and Vimal Chandra Verma

The role of mindfulness in influencing green behaviors has been recognized in literature though it has not been explored sufficiently in the context of organic food. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The role of mindfulness in influencing green behaviors has been recognized in literature though it has not been explored sufficiently in the context of organic food. This study makes an attempt to explore the role of mindfulness in influencing young consumers' purchase intention (PI) toward organic food in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 348 useable responses were collected through an intercept survey at organic food stores using a purposive sampling approach. Data analysis was carried out through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Mindfulness emerged as a significant predictor of behavioral intention. Further, the specific indirect effects of mindfulness through attitude, perceived behavioral control (PBC), drive for environmental responsibility (DER) and label reference willingness (LRW) were also significant.

Originality/value

This research is one of the initial efforts to link mindfulness with PI for organic food. The results could help the government and marketers tap onto the potential of mindfulness with regard to environment-friendly products and frame appropriate strategies for stimulating the demand for organic food in India

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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