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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Peter Jones, Colin Clarke‐Hill, Peter Shears and David Hillier

During the past five years consumer demand for organic food has risen dramatically in the wake of a series of high profile scares about food safety. This paper provides a…

9732

Abstract

During the past five years consumer demand for organic food has risen dramatically in the wake of a series of high profile scares about food safety. This paper provides a case study of the retailing of organic foods. The case study includes an outline of the characteristics and development of the organic food market, an examination of the different players within the retail market place and a discussion of pricing, supply and marketing issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Ays¸e Özfer Özc¸elik and Asli Uçar

This study was planned and carried out among the academic staff working in Ankara (Turkey) in order to determine their perception of organic foods.

1903

Abstract

Purpose

This study was planned and carried out among the academic staff working in Ankara (Turkey) in order to determine their perception of organic foods.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 240 academicians from three institutes at the Ankara University were selected to participate in the research. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire, in which a Likert type scale was used to determine the perception of organic foods. The institutes where the academic staff work are considered as the variables in the study (science, health sciences, and social sciences).

Findings

The research results indicated that there was a significant correlation between the institutes and academicians agreement with 12 statements in the survey questionnaire. Considering the institute variable, no significant difference was found in the organic foods perceptions of individuals from different institutes.

Originality/value

Organic products are widely on the market today. Consumer demand for organic foods has been steadily rising worldwide. Organic food consumption has slightly increased in Turkey in recent years, too. Still, many Turkish consumers do not have enough knowledge about organic foods yet. This study is valuable in that it explores at least some of the Turkish consumers' perception of organic foods whose consumption in the world is increasing fast.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

B. Beharrell and J.H. MacFie

The apparent conflict between what is scientifically known and whatis perceived concerning food acceptability by consumers provides aninteresting paradox. Some of the…

3072

Abstract

The apparent conflict between what is scientifically known and what is perceived concerning food acceptability by consumers provides an interesting paradox. Some of the leading international contributions concerned with organic farming system food products are thus reviewed in the light of consumer beliefs and attitudes. It is concluded that, in a market economy, consumer opinion will gradually prevail and that agricultural farming systems will have to adjust to more extensive lower input farming approaches.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 93 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Annelies Verdurme, Xavier Gellynck and Jacques Viaene

The paper aims at investigating whether or not organic food consumers are automatically opposed to genetically modified (GM) food. Results from quantitative market…

4534

Abstract

The paper aims at investigating whether or not organic food consumers are automatically opposed to genetically modified (GM) food. Results from quantitative market research indicate that this is not the case. Based on attitude towards GM food, three consumer segments are identified: the opponents; the proponents; and the neutrals. Only about 40 per cent of the organic consumers, namely the opponents, reject the use of genetic modification in organic food production. The neutrals are neither against nor in favour of GM food, while the proponents support GM in food production. Besides attitude towards GM food, the proponents differ from the other two segments in terms of beliefs, general attitudes and purchase intentions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Robert Connor and Lesley Douglas

2250

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2022

Jiseon Ahn and Amjad Shamim

The advent of COVID-19 was followed by an increased demand for organic products along with newfound customer interest in healthy consumption habits. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The advent of COVID-19 was followed by an increased demand for organic products along with newfound customer interest in healthy consumption habits. This study aims to explore the impact of multidimensional consciousness on consumers’ attitudes and purchasing intentions toward organic food brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the importance of culture on customers’ decision-making, data were collected from the USA and India to examine the potential cultural differences with respect to organic products. A conceptual model is derived and tested using partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that organic consciousness (e.g. for organic standards) is the most important predictor of attitudes, whereas environmental consciousness appears to be the prime motive in the formation of purchase intentions. Multidimensional (i.e. organic, environment, health and social) consciousness can predict attitude and intention. However, organic standards and social consciousness fail to directly influence customers’ purchasing intention. The impact of each dimension of consciousness varies between USA and Indian customers.

Originality/value

This study provides an understanding of customers’ sustainable consumption behavior by clarifying the relative impact of multidimensional perceived values. Also, because of the growth of organic food market globally, the findings of this study offer valuable insights by identifying the cultural difference between Western and Eastern customers’ behavior.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 August 2022

Tatiana Anisimova and Jan Weiss

Previous research has found mixed evidence of an attitude–behavior gap in organic food consumption. However, the complex mechanisms underlying this gap warrant further…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has found mixed evidence of an attitude–behavior gap in organic food consumption. However, the complex mechanisms underlying this gap warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of word-of-mouth (WOM), trust, and involvement in the relationship between consumer organic food attitudes and conative loyalty. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used as underlying framework for modeling our conceptualized arguments.

Design/methodology/approach

A moderation and moderated mediation analysis was performed on a cross-sectional sample of 1,011 Australian organic food consumers.

Findings

The results support the TPB-inspired moderated-mediation model. Specifically, the authors found moderated mediation effects of WOM, trust, and involvement on conative loyalty via attitudes toward organics.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional research design and the focus solely on Australian consumers constitute limitations of this study.

Practical implications

The authors' findings imply that an analysis of the attitude–behavior gap should go beyond the testing of contingent consistency hypotheses and instead combine moderation and mediation mechanisms to better model consumer decision-making leading to conative loyalty. Practitioners would face a resource challenge when targeting low-trust, low-involvement, and low-WOM consumers as developing conative loyalty of these segments would require a longer-term approach through building favorable attitudes toward organic foods.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to demonstrate the potential of examining the attitude–behavior gap in the organic food context through a moderated mediation lens in explaining the dynamics of conative loyalty.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Arijit Roy, Arpita Ghosh and Devika Vashisht

The paper aims to critically review the literature based on the factors identified by the authors to discuss and provide direction for future research. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to critically review the literature based on the factors identified by the authors to discuss and provide direction for future research. The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze the factors responsible for affecting consumers’ perceptions and purchasing attitudes toward organic food products.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review follows the review methodology elaborating on key factors identified which affect the consumer’s perception and attitude toward organic farming and products. A total of 50 articles are downloaded from different sources such as Google Scholar and Scopus and later the articles were finalized based on core areas and specializations.

Findings

The findings reveal that the behavioral aspect plays a crucial role in the adoption of organic products by consumers; also various factors such as customer perspective, demand and supply, health aspect, cost-effectiveness, standard and reliability are responsible in endorsing organic products. The authors also reveal that among the factors mentioned, the lack of a supply chain market for organic products is the prime concern for the non-availability of products.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of effective distribution and promotion system affects the availability of organic food products.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive review of organic food in terms of highlighting the factors affecting the perception and purchasing attitude of consumers toward organic food products consumption. Also, the present review study gives an idea of organizing the literature on the organic food based on factors influencing the customer responses.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Marija Radman

The market for organic products in Croatia is at the beginning of its development. There is no sufficient knowledge about organic consumers in Croatia. The objective of…

7517

Abstract

Purpose of this paper

The market for organic products in Croatia is at the beginning of its development. There is no sufficient knowledge about organic consumers in Croatia. The objective of this paper is to gain knowledge about consumer attitudes toward organic products in the capital of Croatia.

Design/methodology/approach

The consumers’ attitudes were collected by means of a face‐to‐face survey. Attitudes, purchase frequency, supply satisfaction and beliefs about organic foods were studied with a sample of 179 consumers. The data obtained from the survey were analysed with univariate analysis, chi‐square test, ANOVA and correlation analysis.

Findings

Croatian consumers consider organically‐grown products as very healthy, of good quality and tasty. However, these products are perceived as rather expensive and of questionable appearance. Consumers are not very familiar with the supply of ecologically‐grown products in the market. Some groups of consumers have more positive attitudes toward organic products, and they exhibit an increased willingness to pay higher prices for these products. Therefore, marketing strategies for organic products should be targeted towards such groups.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this study is the choice of the sample. Further research is needed to discriminate between consumer groups, and to determine which segments are most appropriate for organic product marketing.

Practical implications

According to the research results an important task for the producers will be to increase consumers’ knowledge of what an organic product is and how to differentiate it in the marketplace.

Originality/value

This paper gives the first insight into buying behavior and attitudes of organic consumers in Zagreb. The results of the research could be used for planning further marketing activities.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2022

Kamran Khan, Irfan Hameed, Umair Akram and Syed Karamatullah Hussainy

Human health, food safety and environmental concerns are growing issues for policymakers, firms and the general public. Food without chemicals and pesticides is healthy…

Abstract

Purpose

Human health, food safety and environmental concerns are growing issues for policymakers, firms and the general public. Food without chemicals and pesticides is healthy for the human body and hence, relevant motives to promote organic food consumption needs to be explored. This study used three motivational factors, i.e. hedonic, gain and normative motivations proposed by goal-framing theory (GFT) that affect sustainable consumption. Considering the local scenario, constructs like normative triggers and knowledge have also been incorporated into the model. Therefore, this study attempts to explore whether normative triggers and motivations influence the intention to purchase organic food with the application of GFT

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 467 consumers using the purposive sampling technique. The span of the collection of data collection was around five months. Partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) has been applied and after checking the validity and reliability indicators, bootstrapping has been used for hypotheses testing.

Findings

All the motivational factors were found significant and positive to consumers' intentions toward organic food. Moreover, normative triggers also influence intentions. The construct knowledge was not found in a direct relationship with intentions; however, a moderating role was established between gain motivations and intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The study validated and extended the concepts presented in the GFT. Motivational constructs were found important and can be implied in low-cost product categories. The policymakers are suggested to take appropriate measures, based on empirical results.

Originality/value

The study provides an understanding of motivational factors, normative triggers and knowledge in the organic food consumption extent. This will help administrative authorities, marketers and producers of organic food in making their policies, communication strategies and production preferences.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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