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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Torkil Clemmensen

To outline how psychology as one of the original approaches to humancomputer interaction (HCI) has formed a key part of the HCI literature, and to discuss the need for…

Abstract

Purpose

To outline how psychology as one of the original approaches to humancomputer interaction (HCI) has formed a key part of the HCI literature, and to discuss the need for psychological approaches to HCI and system development.

Design/methodology/approach

The contributions to the journal HumanComputer Interaction is examined from the journal's start in 1985 up to the millennium. The analysis focuses the three main elements, task, user and computer, in the classic study “Psychology of humancomputer interaction” from 1983.

Findings

Provides information about authorship, and form and focus of research published. The paper concludes that already from the beginning, HCI researchers too narrowly used Card et al.'s analytical framework. Today it has developed into a sub‐theory within a multidisciplinary HCI science and in this role it continues to be an important cumulative factor in HCI.

Research limitations/implications

The main conclusion about the role of psychology in HCI only applies to the mainly US authors who published in the journal investigated in the given period. European research focusing on information technology and people may differ in important ways.

Practical implications

A much needed discussion of a central document of historical importance tying together many HCI researchers and a range of HCI studies.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils partly the need for meta‐analyses of the psychological approach to HCI.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Xia Zhang, Youchao Sun and Yanjun Zhang

Semantic modelling is an essential prerequisite for designing the intelligent humancomputer interaction in future aircraft cockpit. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Semantic modelling is an essential prerequisite for designing the intelligent humancomputer interaction in future aircraft cockpit. The purpose of this paper is to outline an ontology-based solution to this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The scenario elements are defined considering the cognitive behaviours, system functions, interaction behaviours and interaction situation. The knowledge model consists of a five-tuple array including concepts, relations, functions, axioms and instances. Using the theory of belief-desire-intention, the meta-model of cognitive behaviours is established. The meta-model of system functions is formed under the architecture of sub-functions. Supported by information flows, the meta-model of interaction behaviours is presented. Based on the socio-technical characteristics, the meta-model of interaction situation is proposed. The knowledge representation and reasoning process is visualized with the semantic web rule language (SWRL) on the Protégé platform. Finally, verification and evaluation are carried out to assess the rationality and quality of the ontology model. Application scenarios of the proposed modelling method are also illustrated.

Findings

Verification results show that the knowledge reasoning based on SWRL rules can further enrich the knowledge base in terms of instance attributes and thereby improve the adaptability and learning ability of the ontology model in different simulations. Evaluation results show that the ontology model has a good quality with high cohesion and low coupling.

Practical implications

The approach presented in this paper can be applied to model complex human–machine–environment systems, from a semantics-driven perspective, especially for designing future cockpits.

Originality/value

Different from the traditional approaches, the method proposed in this paper tries to deal with the socio-technical modelling issues concerning multidimensional information semantics. Meanwhile, the constructed model has the ability of autonomous reasoning to adapt to complex situations.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Steve Bailey and Jay Vidyarthi

The purpose of this paper is to question why records management is not currently able to fully meet the needs of its users and to explore the potential role of human

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to question why records management is not currently able to fully meet the needs of its users and to explore the potential role of humancomputer interaction (HCI) in helping it to address this weakness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper has been jointly written by two authors: one a records manager; the other an experienced HCI practitioner. It draws on the experience of the records professional to identify some of the challenges facing records management today, particularly the problems it faces trying to meet the (differing?) needs of both the organization as a whole and of individual users. The HCI practitioner then explores how the application of HCI principles to the design of recordkeeping systems may offer a fresh perspective in meeting these twin demands.

Findings

Records management is heavily reliant on the participation of individual and collective users to achieve its aims, and yet the understanding of their requirements is often basic and simplistic. In part this is due to a concentration on the needs of “the organization” as a whole and of the traditional focus records management has had on standardisation. The authors argue that whilst this organizational perspective remains important, it cannot be addressed at the expense of providing genuine benefits to the individual user. The field of HCI offers a proven, robust and sophisticated way of identifying and meeting the needs of users in ways which could enable records management to meet the needs of both its “masters”.

Practical implications

The application of HCI principles to the design of recordkeeping systems could fundamentally alter the way in which we view the implementation of record management technologies. It also raises questions about the limitations of striving to adopt a purely “standards based” approach to records management which runs counter to much of the prevailing wisdom regarding the perceived objectives of records management.

Originality/value

This paper marks the first exploration of the benefits that might be achieved by applying the field of HCI to records management. As such it represents the first important step towards creating a new inter‐disciplinary approach to achieving records management systems that fully meet the needs of their users.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

J.H. Abawajy

The purpose of this paper is to explore characteristics of humancomputer interaction when the human body and its movements become input for interaction and interface…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore characteristics of humancomputer interaction when the human body and its movements become input for interaction and interface control in pervasive computing settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper quantifies the performance of human movement based on Fitt's Law and discusses some of the human factors and technical considerations that arise in trying to use human body movements as an input medium.

Findings

The paper finds that new interaction technologies utilising human movements may provide more flexible, naturalistic interfaces and support the ubiquitous or pervasive computing paradigm.

Practical implications

In pervasive computing environments the challenge is to create intuitive and user‐friendly interfaces. Application domains that may utilize human body movements as input are surveyed here and the paper addresses issues such as culture, privacy, security and ethics raised by movement of a user's body‐based interaction styles.

Originality/value

The paper describes the utilization of human body movements as input for interaction and interface control in pervasive computing settings.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Lei Li, Qingyun Huang, KwanHo Yeung and Zhaoquan Jian

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of human-computer interaction (HCI) on customers’ perceived electronic service (e-service) value and the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of human-computer interaction (HCI) on customers’ perceived electronic service (e-service) value and the mediating role of task-technology fit (TTF) in that effect.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a model based on service-dominant logic (SDL) and TTF theory, and validates it using a hierarchical regression with the data collected from 634 online banking customers in Guangdong Province and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in China.

Findings

The findings reveal that HCI in e-service contexts comprises five components. Three fundamental components (i.e. technology functionality, customer technology readiness and task routine) contribute to value co-creation. Two core components (i.e. interaction between customer technology readiness and technology functionality, and interaction between task routine and technology functionality) are inhibitors, but the inhibitory effect of the former is only significant in the Guangdong sample. TTF takes a mediating role in these relationships, but the mediating effect of the former core component is only significant in the Guangdong sample.

Originality/value

This paper explains two basic questions about the trigger points of value co-creation in e-service contexts (i.e. what their operational definitions are and how to measure them) and unlocks the “black box” of value co-creation by taking TTF as a mediator. SDL and TTF theory are extended. The paper provides suggestions for how practitioners can efficiently advance value co-creation with customers.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Micheline Beaulieu

The paper aims to explore the concepts of interaction and interactivity presented in different theoretical models in the fields of humancomputer interaction (HCI) and…

Abstract

The paper aims to explore the concepts of interaction and interactivity presented in different theoretical models in the fields of humancomputer interaction (HCI) and information‐seeking/searching behaviour, and to relate these to information retrieval (IR) research. It is suggested that interaction in HCI is primarily concerned with establishing a user/system dialogue at the user interface and does not address the interactive characteristics of IR operational tasks. A distinction is made between general informationseeking models and information‐searching models for computerised systems. The former are deemed to provide a useful framework for characterising interaction at the task level, with the structural relationship between tasks as well as the dynamic transition from one task to another being key features of the interactive process. Although the latter are all concerned with how searchers interact with IR systems, each of the models examined represents user interaction at different levels of abstraction. Taken together they provide complementary views of a highly dynamic process. Three principal aspects of interaction are identified and discussed: interaction within and across tasks; the notion of interaction as task sharing; and interaction as a discourse. In conclusion the adoption of an interaction paradigm for IR research is advocated and examples of empirical work for supporting interactive searching and retrieval are provided.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2004

Tom McEwan and Sandra Cairncross

If initial attempts to incorporate reusable multimedia into university teaching were characterised by the efforts of enthusiasts, the growth of the “Learning Object”…

Abstract

If initial attempts to incorporate reusable multimedia into university teaching were characterised by the efforts of enthusiasts, the growth of the “Learning Object” economy in recent years requires a more strategic and systems‐based approach. While all reusable learning materials have a value, both financial and educational, multimedia in particular is expensive to produce. Systematic production (based on ISO 14915 standards (2002a, 2002b, 2003) and evaluation of fitness for purpose, are paramount. Human‐centred design (HCD) methodologies, based on the ISO 13407 standard (1999), are now well‐established for ensuring that investments in technology result in benefits, and in particular lay heavy emphasis on the frequent use of evaluation. This paper reviews literature in educational multimedia production, interaction design, HCD, and pedagogy, and summarises ongoing attempts to standardise a definition of reusable learning objects (RLOs), with multimedia learning objects (MLOs) as a specific example. We conclude that evaluation must be central to the production and deployment of MLOs. We report on experiences applying an existing framework for effective production of multimedia learning resources, and propose revisions to this framework to add effective evaluation mechanisms.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Stephen B. Gilbert, Michael C. Dorneich, Jamiahus Walton and Eliot Winer

This chapter describes five disciplinary domains of research or lenses that contribute to the design of a team tutor. We focus on four significant challenges in developing…

Abstract

This chapter describes five disciplinary domains of research or lenses that contribute to the design of a team tutor. We focus on four significant challenges in developing Intelligent Team Tutoring Systems (ITTSs), and explore how the five lenses can offer guidance for these challenges. The four challenges arise in the design of team member interactions, performance metrics and skill development, feedback, and tutor authoring. The five lenses or research domains that we apply to these four challenges are Tutor Engineering, Learning Sciences, Science of Teams, Data Analyst, and HumanComputer Interaction. This matrix of applications from each perspective offers a framework to guide designers in creating ITTSs.

Details

Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Shivakumar Sastry

A SmartSpace is an integrated, intelligent, environment that facilitates new dimensions of human interaction with computing and physical environments by leveraging…

Abstract

A SmartSpace is an integrated, intelligent, environment that facilitates new dimensions of human interaction with computing and physical environments by leveraging emerging trends in pervasive computing. The SmartSpace for automation (SSA) proposed here facilitates interactions between humans and an automation system. Current humancomputer interaction (HCI) approaches for automation are based on a state‐transition paradigm using splintered devices that are attached locally to controllers. Such approaches are unlikely to extend to future generations of automation systems because of the fundamental limitations they impose on the tasks that can be accomplished, the lack of support for holistic system‐wide decision‐making, and the lack of a systematic framework that can guide the adoption of emerging pervasive devices for HCI activities. The approach we describe for developing an SSA is based on a goal‐seeking paradigm and emphasizes the explicit representation and resolution of uncertainties.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2007

Jason Chong Lee, Shahtab Wahid, D. Scott McCrickard, C. M. Chewar and Ben Congleton

Decades of innovation in designing usable (and unusable) interfaces have resulted in a plethora of guidelines, usability methods, and other design tools. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Decades of innovation in designing usable (and unusable) interfaces have resulted in a plethora of guidelines, usability methods, and other design tools. The purpose of this research is to develop ways for novice developers to effectively leverage and contribute to the large and growing body of usability knowledge and methods.

Design/methodology/approach

This work presents the first extensive usage evaluation of an integrated design environment and knowledge management system, LINK‐UP. Key to this effort is the central design record (CDR), a design representation meant to prevent breakdowns occurring between design and evaluation phases.

Findings

The case study results show that a design knowledge IDE centered on the CDR can help novices make connections between requirements data, design representations and evaluation data and better understand how to leverage that information to improve designs.

Research limitations/implications

Future efforts are focusing on exploring the utility of this approach for practitioners—especially agile developers.

Practical implications

A useful process and toolset for teaching usability design to novice developers and students.

Originality/value

The CDR makes designs coherent and understandable, thus supporting a principled, guided development process critical for student developers.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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