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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

B.W. Balch and Bichaka Fayissa

Macroeconomic data are examined to identify the factors whichinfluence the job search duration of American workers during the 1970sand 1980s. Among the factors…

Abstract

Macroeconomic data are examined to identify the factors which influence the job search duration of American workers during the 1970s and 1980s. Among the factors investigated, the overall unemployment rate and personal characteristics of job seekers emerge as more important influences on search time than the techniques used to find work. Instead of relying entirely upon longitudinal micro data or special survey data to test the job search model, readily available macro data series are utilised. A policy implication which may be drawn from the study is that government programmes which intervene into the personal lives of the unemployed are appropriate. Basic education and vocational training as well as job search assistance are suggested for less well‐educated and inexperienced labour‐force participants.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Tony Mallier and Mark Bailey

Summer vacation employment plays an important role in the financial survival of students in higher education. Examines what job search methods are used and questionnaire…

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934

Abstract

Summer vacation employment plays an important role in the financial survival of students in higher education. Examines what job search methods are used and questionnaire evidence is analysed to establish how success in job search is dependent on a number of control and job search variables. Finds that for students seeking temporary full‐time employment, a search process including either the use of Job Centres and/or responses to newspaper advertisements increases the probability of gaining work. However, females were found to be less likely to gain full‐time temporary work than males. The success of those students seeking part‐time employment was improved by the use of a private employment agency. A mature student was found to be more likely to obtain a job in all of the models.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Emmanuel Affum-Osei, Henry Kofi Mensah, Eric Adom Asante and Solomon Kwarteng Forkuoh

The purpose of this study is to examine the (1) psychometric properties of Crossley and Highhouse's job search strategy scale and (2) the predictive utility of the scale…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the (1) psychometric properties of Crossley and Highhouse's job search strategy scale and (2) the predictive utility of the scale on fit perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from unemployed job seekers in Ghana (nT1 = 720; nT2 = 418). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to examine the data.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis on the first random sub-sample (n = 362) supported a three-factor model. Confirmatory factor analysis on the second random sub-sample (n = 358) confirmed the three-factor structure and was invariant across job search contexts and genders. Moreover, structural path results showed that the use of focussed and exploratory job search strategies facilitated positive fit perceptions and the use of haphazard job search resulted in poor job fit perceptions.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the dimensionality of job search strategies based on different job search context by linking it to fit perceptions. Moreover, the authors provide evidence that the job search strategy scale has a valid psychometric property and a promising instrument to assess job search behaviour across job search contexts and genders in an understudied population.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Serge P. da Motta Veiga, Daniel B. Turban, Allison S. Gabriel and Nitya Chawla

Searching for a job is an important process that influences short- and long-term career outcomes as well as well-being and psychological health. As such, job search

Abstract

Searching for a job is an important process that influences short- and long-term career outcomes as well as well-being and psychological health. As such, job search research has grown tremendously over the last two decades. In this chapter, the authors provide an overview of prior research, discuss important trends in current research, and suggest areas for future research. The authors conceptualize the job search as an unfolding process (i.e., a process through which job seekers navigate through stages to achieve their goal of finding and accepting a job) in which job seekers engage in self-regulation behaviors. The authors contrast research that has taken a between-person, static approach with research that has taken a within-person, dynamic approach and highlight the importance of combining between- and within-person designs in order to have a more holistic understanding of the job search process. Finally, authors provide some recommendations for future research. Much remains to be learned about what influences job search self-regulation, and how job self-regulation influences job search and employment outcomes depending on individual, contextual, and environmental factors.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2020

Sandra Miranda and Carolina Duarte

This study aims to research the job search journey of Portuguese Millennials. A job search journey is defined as the contact points between organisations and candidates…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to research the job search journey of Portuguese Millennials. A job search journey is defined as the contact points between organisations and candidates throughout the job search process and the flow of this journey.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 13 individuals.

Findings

This paper shows that the contact points established by individuals during the first stage of their job search influence the subsequent contact points chosen to gather information about the organisation and also the journey undertaken up until the decision is made to apply for the job.

Originality/value

This research intends to contribute to the existing literature in two ways: it proposes a new concept which is designated the job search journey, and it maps out the job search journey of Portuguese Millennials.

Details

European Journal of Management Studies, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2183-4172

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Steven Wald

The two main purposes of the paper are: first, to provide an empirical test of the widely‐held view among employers that overqualified workers are less committed as…

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2992

Abstract

Purpose

The two main purposes of the paper are: first, to provide an empirical test of the widely‐held view among employers that overqualified workers are less committed as evidenced by heightened levels of job search, and second, to evaluate the three explanations of overqualification (matching theory, the theory of differential overqualification, and the career mobility hypothesis) in which job search plays a central role.

Design/methodology/approach

Maximum likelihood probit estimation is conducted on a sample of employed Canadians aged 18 and over who were surveyed in 2000. Predictors of job search are derived from the economic assumption that the employee's decision to undertake job search depends on a cost‐benefit assessment.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that overqualified workers are more active job searchers, and lend support to the matching theory view that overqualification is sub‐optimal from the worker's perspective.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the small number of European studies exploring the connection between overqualification and job search. The impacts of overqualification are especially important for Canadian employers given the high incidence of overqualification of the Canadian work force.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Hannes Zacher and Angelika Bock

In the context of demographic and economic changes, helping mature age job seekers find employment is imperative. The purpose of this paper is to examine mature age job

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of demographic and economic changes, helping mature age job seekers find employment is imperative. The purpose of this paper is to examine mature age job seekers’ proactive personality as a moderator of the relationship between age and job search intensity; and to examine job search self-efficacy as a mediator of this moderation effect. It was hypothesized that the generally negative relationships between age and job search self-efficacy and intensity are weaker among job seekers with a more proactive personality.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 188 job seekers between 40 and 64 years completed an online questionnaire. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Consistent with previous research, age was negatively related to job search intensity. Proactive personality was positively related to job search intensity and moderated the relationship between age and job search intensity. Extending previous research, proactive personality also positively predicted job search self-efficacy and moderated the relationship between age and job search self-efficacy which, in turn, positively predicted job search intensity.

Research limitations/implications

Potential limitations of the study include the cross-sectional design, sample selectivity, and the omission of possibly important control variables.

Practical implications

Practitioners, organizations, and societies concerned with helping mature age job seekers find employment could provide additional support to those with a less proactive personality and low job search self-efficacy.

Originality/value

This study extends previous research by showing that mature age job seekers’ job search self-efficacy mediates the moderating effect of proactive personality on the relationship between age and job search intensity.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Bernard J. Jansen, Karen J. Jansen and Amanda Spink

The web is now a significant component of the recruitment and job search process. However, very little is known about how companies and job seekers use the web, and the…

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9030

Abstract

Purpose

The web is now a significant component of the recruitment and job search process. However, very little is known about how companies and job seekers use the web, and the ultimate effectiveness of this process. The specific research questions guiding this study are: how do people search for job‐related information on the web? How effective are these searches? And how likely are job seekers to find an appropriate job posting or application?

Design/methodology/approach

The data used to examine these questions come from job seekers submitting job‐related queries to a major web search engine at three points in time over a five‐year period.

Findings

Results indicate that individuals seeking job information generally submit only one query with several terms and over 45 percent of job‐seeking queries contain a specific location reference. Of the documents retrieved, findings suggest that only 52 percent are relevant and only 40 percent of job‐specific searches retrieve job postings.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an important contribution to web research and online recruiting literature. The data come from actual web searches, providing a realistic glimpse into how job seekers are actually using the web.

Practical implications

The results of this research can assist organizations in seeking to use the web as part of their recruiting efforts, in designing corporate recruiting web sites, and in developing web systems to support job seeking and recruiting.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies to investigate job searching on the web using longitudinal real world data.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Isabelle Fort, Flora Jacquet and Naïs Leroy

This study aims to examine the relationship between job search self‐efficacy, employment goals, job search planning, job search behaviors and effort allocated to job search.

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4039

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between job search self‐efficacy, employment goals, job search planning, job search behaviors and effort allocated to job search.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors expected that employment goals would mediate the effect of job search self‐efficacy on job search planning, job search behaviors and effort allocated to job search. In total, 100 participants completed measures of these concepts. The results are discussed with reference to previous studies and to methodological choices.

Findings

Regression analyses did not confirm the hypotheses. Contrary to expectations, employment goals did not mediate the path between self‐efficacy, job search planning, job search behaviors and effort allocated to job search. Instead, self‐efficacy directly influenced job search planning and job search behaviors.

Originality/value

Few studies have investigated the effect of self‐efficacy on goals in job search domain. This paper fills some of the gaps.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Simon Taggar and Lisa K. J. Kuron

Individuals normally make fairness judgements when experiencing negative outcomes on an important task, such as finding employment. Fairness is an affect-laden subjective…

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1628

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals normally make fairness judgements when experiencing negative outcomes on an important task, such as finding employment. Fairness is an affect-laden subjective experience. Perceptions of injustice can cause resource depletion in unemployed job seekers, potentially leading to reduced self-regulation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of: first, justice perceptions during a job search and their impact on job search self-efficacy (JSSE); second, the mediating role of JSSE between justice perceptions and job search strategies; and third, associations between job search strategies and quantity and quality of job search behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Unemployed individuals (n=254) who were actively searching for a job reported on their past job search experiences with respect to justice, completed measures of JSSE, and reported recent job search behavior.

Findings

Results reveal the potentially harmful impact of perceived injustice on job search strategies and the mediating role of JSSE, a self-regulatory construct and an important resource when looking for a job. Specifically, perceived injustice is negatively associated with JSSE. Reduced JSSE is associated with a haphazard job search strategy and less likelihood of exploratory and focussed strategies. A haphazard job search strategy is associated with making fewer job applications and poor decision making. Conversely, perceived justice is associated with higher JSSE and exploratory and focussed job search strategies. These two strategies are generally associated with higher quality job search behavior.

Research limitations/implications

There are two major limitations. First, while grounded in social-cognitive theory of self-regulation and conservation of resources (COR) theory, a cross-sectional research design limits determination of causality in the model of JSSE as a central social-cognitive mechanism explaining how justice impacts job search strategies. Second, some results may be conservative because social desirability may have restricted the range of negative responses.

Practical implications

This study provides insights to individuals who are supporting job seekers (e.g. career counselors, coaches, employers, and social networks). Specifically, interventions aimed at reducing perceptions of injustice, increasing JSSE, and improving job search strategies and behavior may ameliorate the damaging impact of perceived injustice.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine perceived justice in the job search process using social-cognitive theory of self-regulation and COR theory. Moreover, we provide further validation to a relatively new and under-researched job search strategy typology by linking the strategies to the quantity and quality of job search behaviors.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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