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When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Peter Lansley

The development of national capacity to undertake ageing‐related research is vital to ensuring that the challenges arising from an ageing society faced by government…

Abstract

The development of national capacity to undertake ageing‐related research is vital to ensuring that the challenges arising from an ageing society faced by government, society and individuals are adequately understood and quality of life enhanced. Yet, in the early 2000s there was a danger that previous initial investment in ageing research would be wasted. A campaign was mounted to support newcomers to ageing research, especially those in early career, eventually resulting in Strategic Promotion of Ageing Research Capacity (SPARC). This was a four‐year programme to pump‐prime newcomers to ageing research, to publicise the outcomes of ageing research to all stakeholders and to lobby policy‐makers about the value of ageing research. This end‐of‐programme review suggests that those supported with pump‐priming awards have been fast‐tracked into the highly competitive world of ageing research, that the findings have been very well received and that the advocacy activities have been influential. A new model for promoting ageing research has been established.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2009

Richard Faragher

The ageing process is often discussed as though it is unique to humans. However, it can be observed throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. In every species in which it…

Abstract

The ageing process is often discussed as though it is unique to humans. However, it can be observed throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. In every species in which it occurs, the ageing process has common traits. It is a progressive, intrinsic, cumulative and deleterious process that eventually gives rise to physiological frailty, morbidity and death. Historically, biogerontology had a slow start but the last 10 years have seen exceptional progress in understanding both why and how ageing changes occur. As a result of this new knowledge, interventions that could produce longer, healthier human lives are close to becoming clinical realities. Unfortunately, the speed and scale of these advances is not well understood outside the relatively small community of biological gerontologists. This article reviews some of these advances for a non‐specialist audience, speculates on their potential impact and identifies current barriers to future progress.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2011

Mark Bagley, Terence Davis, Joanna Latimer and David Kipling

Increased longevity is the success story of 20th‐century biomedicine, together with improvements in general living conditions, but it brings great challenges. Although…

Abstract

Increased longevity is the success story of 20th‐century biomedicine, together with improvements in general living conditions, but it brings great challenges. Although many individuals do undergo what might be termed ‘successful ageing’, this is not a universal experience, for with older age comes a range of age‐related diseases and degenerations that can diminish, if not destroy, quality of life for some older individuals. Biogerontology is the study of the biology of ageing, a normal process but one that has the potential to contribute to age‐related disease. Its goal is to extend the proportion of a life that is healthy, an outcome that is desirable both at an individual and a societal level. One of the great insights from the last decade or more of biogerontology is the realisation that the ageing process is not a fixed, unchangeable process. Rather, it is controlled by genes and is open to experimental interventions that extend healthy lifespan, in species from microbes to mice. These findings have produced a sea change in the way the biogerontological community views ageing: not as a fixed, ‘inevitable’ process, but one where rates of ageing vary enormously according to genotype, and can be readily changed by interventions. This makes the biological process of ageing an attractive target both to understand, and target, age‐related conditions.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2009

David Wilson

Knowledge of why and how we age is pointing to ways to extend human longevity. Studies in model organisms indicate that increasing the expression of repair and maintenance…

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Abstract

Knowledge of why and how we age is pointing to ways to extend human longevity. Studies in model organisms indicate that increasing the expression of repair and maintenance genes results in slower ageing and increased life expectancy. It might soon be possible to achieve such slowing of ageing in humans. The evidence for, and societal consequences of, such an advance are discussed.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Nolwenn Bühler

Abstract

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When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

Abstract

Details

When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

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