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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Junaid Khalid, Qingxiong Derek Weng, Adeel Luqman, Muhammad Imran Rasheed and Maryam Hina

The information and communication technologies have made it progressively practical for employees to remain associated with work, even when they are not in the workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

The information and communication technologies have made it progressively practical for employees to remain associated with work, even when they are not in the workplace. However, prior studies have provided very little understanding of the implications for the deviant behavior aspect. The current study aims to investigate the association between after-hours work-related technology usage and interpersonal, organizational and nonwork deviance through psychological transition, interruption overload and task closure. The authors draw upon the theory of conservation of resource (COR) to examine the research model.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary data for the study has been collected in two waves from the sample of 318 employees who were working in diverse organizations in the Anhui province of the People's Republic of China for empirical testing of the authors’ research model.

Findings

This study's findings have revealed the positive association of after-hour work-related technology use with individuals' deviance in its entire three forms through psychological transition and interruption overload and have negative associations with all forms of deviance through task closure.

Originality/value

The significant contribution of this study is in the literature on technology use and employee outcomes, by identifying the consequences of technology use in both work (interpersonal deviance and organizational deviance) and outside work domain (nonwork deviance) and exploring the underlying mechanisms for these relationships in detail. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first of its kind that investigates a relationship between after-hours technology use and all three kinds of deviance while exploring both the positive and negative perspectives in one study.

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2021

Fenika Wulani and Marliana Junaedi

This study investigates the relationship between passive leadership and deviant behaviors targeted to supervisors (supervisor-directed deviance) and coworkers…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the relationship between passive leadership and deviant behaviors targeted to supervisors (supervisor-directed deviance) and coworkers (interpersonal deviance), and the moderating effect power distance and collectivism have on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey questionnaire. Respondents were 310 non-managerial employees working in various industries in Surabaya, Indonesia. This study uses partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to examine hypotheses.

Findings

This study indicates that passive leadership has a positive relationship with supervisor-directed deviance, but not with interpersonal deviance. Moreover, power distance moderates these relationships. Additionally, the findings show that collectivism moderates the relationship between passive leadership and interpersonal deviance, but not with supervisor-directed deviance.

Practical implications

Managers need to be aware of the roles and responsibilities of their positions and understand their subordinates' expectations, specifically related to their cultural values.

Originality/value

Few studies have investigated the relationship between passive leadership and deviant behaviors, especially those directed at supervisors and coworkers. Also, there is little study that explored the role of cultural values in these relationships. The present study provides new insight regarding the moderating role power distance and collectivism have in the relationship between passive leadership and deviant behaviors.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Marliana Junaedi and Fenika Wulani

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between job stress and deviant behaviors, which include organizational and frontline deviance, and the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between job stress and deviant behaviors, which include organizational and frontline deviance, and the moderating effect of person–organization (P-O) fit on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 259 frontline employees working in Surabaya, Indonesia. Respondents were asked to complete a questionnaire distributed by survey assistants. This present study conducts partial least squares structural equation modeling to examine hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that job stress has positive correlations with organizational and frontline deviance. P-O fit has a moderating effect on the relationship between job stress and frontline deviance; the lower the P-O fit, the stronger the relationship between job stress and frontline deviance. P-O fit does not moderate the relationship between job stress and organizational deviance.

Practical implications

Companies must be more careful in the recruitment and selection process and continuously perform activities to communicate their values and norms to employees.

Originality/value

This study introduces the moderating effect of P-O fit on the relationship between job stress and frontline employees' deviant behaviors, which has not been revealed in previous studies. It provides an understanding of the importance of considering the compatibility between individual and organizational values as one of the company's efforts to reduce stressed employees' responses by engaging in workplace deviance.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Erin M. Richard, Christa P. Bupp and Raad G. Alzaidalsharief

We examine whether supervisor support and empathy moderate the relationship between customer injustice and employee display rule deviance through a reduction in employee anger.

Abstract

Purpose

We examine whether supervisor support and empathy moderate the relationship between customer injustice and employee display rule deviance through a reduction in employee anger.

Methodology

Working adults (N = 214) completed an online survey assessing their experiences with customer injustice, feelings of anger, and the extent to which they deviated from emotional display rules over the past month. Participants also completed a measure of trait anger (a control variable), and they rated their supervisor’s general support and empathy.

Findings

Supervisor empathy (but not supervisor support) buffered the relationship between customer injustice and employee anger. In turn, reduced employee anger is related to lower display rule deviance. Country (United States vs. India) also moderated the effect of anger on display rule deviance; the relationship was stronger in India than in the United States.

Practical implications

Service industry employees typically are expected to regulate their emotional displays by displaying positive emotions and hiding negative emotions. Meeting these display rules is considered paramount to providing good service. Unfortunately, customers sometimes treat service employees in a disrespectful or unfair manner, and the resulting employee anger may cause employees to break emotional display rules. It is difficult to control customer behavior, but our results suggest that empathetic managers may help employees manage the negative emotions that result from customer mistreatment. Thus, selecting and training managers to show empathy may improve customer service by resulting in more resilient employees.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Fenika Wulani, Tarsisius Hani Handoko and Bernardinus Maria Purwanto

This study investigates the effect of supervisor-directed organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on leader–member exchange (LMX), the moderating role of impression…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the effect of supervisor-directed organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on leader–member exchange (LMX), the moderating role of impression management motives on this relationship, the effect of LMX on organizational and interpersonal deviance and the mediating effect of LMX on the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and deviant behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey questionnaire to collect data. Respondents were 342 nonmanagerial employees working in Surabaya Raya, Indonesia. Hypothesis testing is done using Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results show that supervisor-directed OCB is positively related to LMX, and LMX is negatively related to organizational deviance but not significantly related to interpersonal deviance. The study also finds that impression management motives moderate the positive relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and LMX. Furthermore, LMX mediates the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and organizational deviance, but not interpersonal deviance.

Practical implications

This study suggests the importance of human resource management (HRM) activities and managers being aware of subordinate OCB motives and the impact of LMX on interpersonal and organizational deviance, as well as what supervisors need to do to reduce these negative effects.

Originality/value

Few studies examined the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and workplace deviance behaviors (WDBs). This study provides a mechanism of their relationship by considering LMX as a mediator. Also, heretofore the existing studies tend to focus more on LMX as an antecedent of OCB. This study provides an understanding of OCB as an antecedent of LMX with the moderating effect of impression management motives.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2014

Jonathan Furneaux and Craig Furneaux

The purpose of this chapter is to analyse the deviant behaviour of individuals in organisations. Deviants are those who depart from organisational norms. A typology of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to analyse the deviant behaviour of individuals in organisations. Deviants are those who depart from organisational norms. A typology of perceived deviant behaviour is developed from the deviance literature, and subsequently tested.

Methodology/approach

Star Trek: Into Darkness text is qualitatively analysed as a data source. Three different character arcs are analysed in relation to organisational deviance. Starfleet is the specific, fictional, organisational context.

Findings

We found that the typology of deviance is conceptually robust, and facilitates categorisation of different types of deviant behaviour, over time.

Research limitations/implications

Deviance is socially ascribed; so better categorisation of such behaviour improves our understanding of how specific behaviour might deviate from organisational norms, and how different behaviours can mean individuals can be viewed positively or negatively over time.

Further research might determine management responses to the different forms of deviance, and unpack the processes where individuals eschew ‘averageness’ and become deviants.

Practical implications

The typology advanced has descriptive validity to describe deviant behaviour.

Social implications

Social institutions such as organisations ascribe individual deviants, both negatively and positively.

Originality/value

This chapter extends our understanding of positive and negative deviance in organisations by developing a new typology of deviant behaviour. This typology has descriptive validity in understanding deviant behaviour. Our understanding of both positive and negative deviance in organisational contexts is enhanced, as well as the utility of science fiction literature in ethical analysis.

Details

The Contribution of Fiction to Organizational Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-949-2

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2021

Canh Minh Nguyen

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moral licensing effect of other in-group members' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on focal employees'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moral licensing effect of other in-group members' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on focal employees' organizational deviance through moral self-concept. This paper also examines the moderating role of in-group identification in the mediated relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The multilevel path analysis and bootstrapping technique are employed to analyze the findings of a sample of 340 employees in 56 workgroups in Vietnam.

Findings

The results demonstrate that moral self-concept mediates the positive relationship between other in-group members' OCB and focal employees' organizational deviance. Furthermore, the findings indicate that in-group identification strengthens the indirect effect of other in-group members' OCB on focal employees' organizational deviance via moral self-concept.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should be aware of the potential negative consequences of OCB and the drawbacks of in-group identification in group contexts. In addition, practitioners should proactively prevent other in-group members' OCB from resulting in employees' organizational deviance.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the moral licensing effect of OCB on organizational deviance through the moral self-concept mechanism and the moderating role of in-group identification in this mediated relationship.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2021

Naman Sharma

Organisations today seek high engagement levels from their employees for their superior performance amid the highly competitive environment. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations today seek high engagement levels from their employees for their superior performance amid the highly competitive environment. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of positive deviance facilitators (PDFs) in enhancing employee engagement at work.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts the interpretive structural modelling (ISM) and Matrice d’Impacts Croisés-Multiplication Appliquée á un Classement (MICMAC) analysis to understand the process of how positive deviance may fuel employee engagement in an organisation. Because of the lack of empirical evidence on the relationship between employee engagement and positive deviance, ISM approach was adopted as it helps in understanding the subjective experience and learnings of experts involved in the field. The MICMAC analysis classifies the relevant factors into four clusters and helps in understanding the dynamics involved.

Findings

Based on the opinions shared by industry and academia experts, a structural model was developed to understand the hierarchy and interactions among the eight PDFs leading towards employee engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers both theoretical and practical implications. The model developed in the current study could be used as a base model for future studies concerning employee engagement and deviance. The importance of human resource management practices in fuelling positive deviance and employee engagement is also highlighted. The study discusses various practical implications for human resource managers and top management.

Originality/value

The literature on positive deviance at work is still at a nascent stage. Empirical studies on deviance largely focus on the destructive/negative side of workplace deviance, and studies on positive outcomes from workplace deviance are rare. This present study provides a unique opportunity to understand how positive deviance can be used to enhance the engagement levels of employees.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Zhiqiang Liu, Xiaoqing Pan and Tingting Zhu

This study aims to examine why and when employees engage in creative deviance to develop creativity in China. Drawing on strain theory, the authors examined creative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine why and when employees engage in creative deviance to develop creativity in China. Drawing on strain theory, the authors examined creative deviance engagement as a mediator and transformational leadership as a moderator of the distinct relationships between emotional and rational status-striving orientations and radical and incremental creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

Multisource survey data were collected from 126 team leaders and 446 employees in Chinese firms. Multilevel path analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that emotional status-striving orientation relates to creative deviance engagement, which, in turn, has a stronger relationship with radical creativity than with incremental creativity. Furthermore, creative deviance engagement mediates the indirect relationships between emotional status-striving orientation and radical and incremental creativity. Moreover, transformational leadership moderates the above indirect relationships.

Originality/value

This study is among the first attempts to empirically test the distinct relationships between creative deviance engagement and radical and incremental creativity and further examine how creative deviance engagement mediates the indirect relationships between status-striving orientations and radical and incremental creativity. In addition, the boundary condition of the indirect relationships is investigated. The findings provide valuable insights for the extant literature on status and employee creativity.

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Xiaoqin Liu, Yevhen Baranchenko, Fansuo An, Zhibin Lin and Jie Ma

This study aims to explore the impact of ethical leadership on employee creative deviance, with job autonomy as a mediator and creative self-efficacy as a moderator…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the impact of ethical leadership on employee creative deviance, with job autonomy as a mediator and creative self-efficacy as a moderator between job autonomy and creative deviance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was developed based on construct measures from the literature. A total of 316 responses were received from employees of information and communication technology companies located in China's Pearl River Delta.

Findings

Both ethical leadership and job autonomy have a positive impact on employee creative deviance; job autonomy plays a mediating role between ethical leadership and creative deviance; creative self-efficacy does not have a significant moderating effect on the job autonomy-creative deviance relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies could explore the potential moderating role of both job autonomy and creative-self efficacy in the link between ethical leadership and creative deviance.

Practical implications

This study recommends that organizations should adopt and promote an ethical leadership approach to manage creative deviance at work. Organizations could explore alternative methods of task completion to support the job autonomy for the employees to mitigate the dilemmas associated with creative deviance.

Originality/value

This is one of few studies that examine the impact of ethical leadership on employee's creative deviance, despite the fact that the influence of ethical leadership on the followers has been extensively examined.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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