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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Shih Yung Chou, Thuy Nguyen, Charles Ramser and Tree Chang

Integrating the social exchange perspective of helping behavior with self-determination theory (SDT), this study seeks to examine the impact of employees' psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrating the social exchange perspective of helping behavior with self-determination theory (SDT), this study seeks to examine the impact of employees' psychological needs on perceived organizational justice and the impact of perceived organizational justice on employees' helping behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional and cross-organizational data were obtained from 177 full-time employees employed in 12 small- and medium-sized oil and gas service companies. A partial least squares approach using SmartPLS was employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results illustrate that the psychological need for competence and need for autonomy are positively related to perceived distributive and procedural justice, respectively. Moreover, perceived distributive and procedural justice are related to helping behavior. Furthermore, perceived distributive justice fully mediates the relationship between the psychological need for competence and helping behavior, whereas perceived procedural justice partially mediates the relationship between the psychological need for autonomy and helping behavior.

Originality/value

From a theoretical standpoint, this study offers some theoretical explanations for how the basic psychological needs identified by SDT activate employees' perceived organizational justice. Practically, this study offers several managerial recommendations that help managers manage helping behavior in the organization effectively.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Mingzheng Wu, Xiaoling Sun, Delin Zhang and Ci Wang

This study aimed to develop a moderated mediation model to explain the relationship between perceived organizational justice and the counterproductive work behavior (CWB…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to develop a moderated mediation model to explain the relationship between perceived organizational justice and the counterproductive work behavior (CWB) of Chinese public servants. In this model, the authors assumed that job burnout mediates the relationship between perceived organizational justice and CWB and that moral identity moderates the relationship between job burnout and CWB.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 210 public servants in China participated in this study, and their characteristics were measured by self-report tools. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to test the moderated mediation model.

Findings

Analysis of the data demonstrated that perceived organizational justice, job burnout and moral identity influenced CWB. Moral identity moderated the relationship between job burnout and CWB, such that individuals with low moral identity are more likely to engage in CWB. Moreover, job burnout mediated the effect of perceived organizational justice on CWB, and the mediating effect of job burnout was moderated by moral identity. The indirect effect of perceived organizational justice on CWB through job burnout was significant among individuals with low moral identity but not among individuals with high moral identity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight the self-regulatory function of moral identity in preventing CWB.

Practical implications

The study offers several significant suggestions to reduce CWB in Chinese public sector administration, such as by improving organizational justice perception, recruiting and selecting individuals with reference to their moral identity and monitoring employees’ job burnout regularly.

Originality/value

The authors developed and verified a moderated mediated model on the relationship between perceived organizational justice and CWB. The study revealed that job burnout has a mediating effect on the perceived organizational justice–CWB relation, providing important insights into the processes through which perceived organizational justice affects CWB.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Young Ran Joo, Hyoung Koo Moon and Byoung Kwon Choi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived overall justice and the moderating effect of self- and other-centered motives in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived overall justice and the moderating effect of self- and other-centered motives in the relationship between organizational corporate social responsibility (CSR) and organizational attractiveness using a sample of job applicants.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested using a 2-by-2 experimental design and a sample of 376 South Korean University students.

Findings

The results showed that organizational CSR positively influenced job applicants’ perceived overall justice. Moreover, it was found that perceived overall justice mediated the influence of CSR on organizational attractiveness. However, contrary to the hypotheses, the indirect effect of CSR on organizational attractiveness through perceived overall justice was significant only for job applicants who attributed self-centered motives to CSR.

Practical implications

As it was found that job applicants who attributed other-centered motives to organizational CSR had high levels of perceived overall justice regarding organizations, independent of the actual level of engagement in CSR, it is crucial that organizations show sincerity in executing CSR. In addition, small- and medium-sized organizations may not have sufficient resources for CSR, but it is especially crucial for them to focus on CSR activities that are aligned with their business, implement CSR programs consistently, and focus on CSR itself rather than on advertising in order to facilitate, among job applicants, the attribution of other-centered motives to their CSR.

Originality/value

From the perspective of overall justice and attributed motives, this study intensively explores the internal mechanism by which organizational engagement in CSR influences organizational attractiveness among job applicants. In practical terms, this study shows that it is important for organizations to consistently invest in CSR with authenticity, even when CSR activities are insubstantial and doing so may be attributed to self-centered motives. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Mohamed A. Nassar and Michel Zaitouni

This paper aims to examine the relationships between perceptions of organisational justice, perceived competence of supervisor and perceived supervisory support (PSS) in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationships between perceptions of organisational justice, perceived competence of supervisor and perceived supervisory support (PSS) in hotel employees in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees who worked in chain hotels in two cities completed questionnaires on each dimension. Principal component analysis and hierarchical regression analysis were used to evaluate relationships among the dimensions to test the hypothesis that PSS mediates the relationship between perceived organisational justice and perceived competence of supervisor.

Findings

Measures of organisational justice, perceived competence of supervisor and PSS were all positively related to one another. PSS partially mediated the relationship between organisational justice and perceived competence of supervisor.

Research limitations/implications

Results indicate that employees who perceive their managers to be supportive and their organisations to be fair and just also believe that their supervisors are more competent. However, these results are only a cross-sectional snapshot, and future studies could examine how employee attitudes change over time and what factors contribute most to establishing perceptions of managerial competence and trust in the organisation.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that organisations should develop policies that allow managers to foster supportive and transparent relationships with employees to establish confidence between employee and both manager and organisation.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to evaluate the mediating effects of PSS on organisational justice and perceived competence of supervisor in Egypt and in the hospitality industry.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Galit Meisler

The current study aims to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and perceived organizational justice, and how the interplay between them influences…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and perceived organizational justice, and how the interplay between them influences turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 368 employees from a financial organization was used to test the research model and hypotheses. Archival information regarding participants’ actual turnover was also acquired.

Findings

Emotional intelligence was positively related to perceived organizational justice and negatively related to turnover intentions. Furthermore, perceived organizational justice fully mediated the relationship between emotional intelligence and turnover intentions. The archival data concerning employees’ actual turnover was significantly related to the self‐report turnover intentions.

Practical implications

Emotional intelligence training may be a powerful tool that organizations and human resource managers can employ to enhance perceived organizational justice and reduce employees’ turnover.

Originality/value

This research broadens the scope through which the contribution of emotional intelligence in the workplace can be viewed. Findings from the current study advance our understanding of the process by which emotional intelligence affects employees’ perceptions and attitudes.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Kristien Philippaers, Nele De Cuyper and Anneleen Forrier

The purpose of this paper is to advance two seemingly conflicting paths from perceived employability to employee performance. Both paths start from the idea that feeling…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance two seemingly conflicting paths from perceived employability to employee performance. Both paths start from the idea that feeling employable makes employees more independent from their employer. Framed positively, independence implies the perception of being in control, and perceived control may promote employee performance. Framed negatively, independence implies reduced attachment to the organization, while such ties drive employee performance. Innovative features in this study are threefold. First, the authors introduce perceived justice as a moderator. Second, the authors distinguish between perceived quantitative and qualitative employability: this relates to seeing “other” vs “better” job opportunities. Third, the authors include a range of performance indicators: task performance, organizational citizenship behavior and counterproductive work behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected within one Belgian public-sector organization (n=1,500 employees) and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Perceived control mediated the relationship between perceived employability and employee performance, yet only upon high perceived justice. Affective organizational commitment mediated the relationship between perceived employability and employee performance, regardless of perceived justice. Those relationships were positive for quantitative perceived employability and negative for qualitative perceived employability.

Originality/value

Perceived employability relates positively to employee performance, especially upon high perceived justice. Yet this relationship is bounded to which job alternatives are perceived, just “other” or instead “better.”

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2020

Mohammad Nisar Khattak, Roxanne Zolin and Noor Muhammad

The main purpose of this study is to examine the catalytic impact of perceptions of politics in organizations on the relationship between perceived unfairness and deviant…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to examine the catalytic impact of perceptions of politics in organizations on the relationship between perceived unfairness and deviant behavior at work.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the proposed research model, the authors collected field data in a public sector university located in Islamabad Capital Territory, Pakistan. A two-wave questionnaire was distributed to 400 employees. In the first wave, the questionnaire was used to collect data on participants’ perceptions of perceived injustice and organizational politics. After two weeks, the second wave of data collection was conducted by sending another questionnaire to the same respondents to collect data on their organizational and interpersonal deviance.

Findings

Empirical findings revealed that perceived interactional injustice results in interpersonal deviance, and perceived distributive and procedural injustice results in organizational deviance. Moreover, the direct relationship between perceived injustice and deviant behaviors was stronger when the perception of politics factor was high.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is one of the first to test the detrimental effect of perception of politics on deviance in a public organization in Pakistan.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Elisabeth Enoksen

The purpose of this paper is to examine how perceptions of organizational justice and social-focussed personal values influence perceived discrimination against immigrants…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how perceptions of organizational justice and social-focussed personal values influence perceived discrimination against immigrants in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 224 employees of a mental health clinic in Norway completed Schwartz’s Portrait Values Questionnaire that measures personal values, Colquitt’s Organizational Justice Scale, and scale measuring perceived discrimination against immigrant in the workplace.

Findings

Perceived organizational justice and the social-focussed value universalism contributed significantly in explaining variance in perceived discrimination against immigrants in the workplace. Employees who scored low on perceived organizational justice scored high on perceived discrimination against immigrants, and employees who scored high on the value universalism scored high on perceived discrimination against immigrants in the workplace.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design cannot determine causality. The direction of the relationship between the variables is founded on prevailing empirical and theoretical contributions in the field.

Practical implications

Cultural diversity training programs should make employees aware of how their personal values and personal justice experiences influence their perceptions of discrimination against immigrants. Culturally diverse workplaces could benefit from recruiting employees who emphasize universalism.

Originality/value

Co-workers’ perception of exclusion and discriminating behavior against immigrants in the workplace is critical in order to reduce such unjust treatment. There is limited research on factors that influence perceptions of discrimination against others.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2018

Massimo Bergami and Gabriele Morandin

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to our understanding of the antecedents of organizational identification. Specifically, this paper aims to integrate two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to our understanding of the antecedents of organizational identification. Specifically, this paper aims to integrate two perspectives developed within the social identity domain, labeled “cognitive” and “relational,” by comparing and reconciling their relationship organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey method and a structured questionnaire to collect data from people working in a call center. The hypotheses were tested on a sample of 743 employees by using structural equation models and Hayes’ (2017) bootstrapping procedure.

Findings

The results provide evidence for a mediational model in which the attractiveness of organizational images (cognitive representations) mediates the relationship between perceived justice (relational judgments) and organizational identification.

Research limitations/implications

The data were obtained from a single source in a cross-sectional design, which may inflate common method variance. To address threats to validity, the authors employed several procedures, the results of which revealed that no parameters corresponding to the hypotheses changed in sign or significance, thus suggesting that the presence of method bias, if any, was nonconsequential.

Practical implications

Not only does perceived justice relate to the sense of belonging to an organization, but it also contributes to shaping the long-term cognitive representations of the company. In particular, both HR and line managers should be aware that in this respect, the interactional dimension of justice shows the strongest effect.

Originality/value

Building on and enlarging the scope of the extant literature, the findings contribute to our knowledge of how relational judgments shape cognitive images about the company, influencing, in turn, the individual–organization relationship.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Juliana D. Lilly and Meghna Virick

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect that work locus of control has on perceptions of trust, perceived organizational support, procedural justice and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect that work locus of control has on perceptions of trust, perceived organizational support, procedural justice and interactional justice.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 679 alumni of a university in the Southwestern USA. Regression analyses and structural equation modeling were used to test a series of hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that work locus of control has a significant positive relationship on all variables. Perceived organizational support fully mediated the relationship between work locus of control and perceptions of both procedural and interactional justice. Organizational trust fully mediated the relationship between work locus of control and interactional justice, but only partially mediated the relationship between work locus of control and procedural justice.

Research limitations/implications

The data used in this paper are cross‐sectional. Also, results are based on self‐report survey data and subject to common method bias. As such, longitudinal studies are recommended for future research, as are finding antecedents to perceptions of justice that may help managers improve the way they communicate about decision‐making at work.

Originality/value

Findings from the study suggest the important role that personality plays as a precursor to justice perceptions in organizations.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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