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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2021

Yazdan Mansourian

This paper provides selective findings from a broader research project on information behaviours in serious leisure. This paper focuses on the positive feelings of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides selective findings from a broader research project on information behaviours in serious leisure. This paper focuses on the positive feelings of information seeking and sharing in this context, aiming to capture and contextualise the joy of information embedded in and inspired by leisure activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The required data were obtained using semi-structured interviews with 20 serious leisure participants from Wagga Wagga city in Australia, recruited via a maximum variation sampling technique. The data were fully transcribed and analysed based on a qualitative thematic analysis method.

Findings

The joy of information is embedded within a wide spectrum of information activities in serious leisure ranging from information seeking and browsing to information sharing and information creation. Among all these activities, information sharing with peers and a broader audience is the most joyful experience because it often generates social engagement, a sense of belonging and friendship. Moreover, serious leisure is a productive ground to transform hedonic wellness into eudaimonic well-being, while continuous information seeking and sharing play a significant role in achieving this goal.

Practical implications

Information system designers can use the findings to consider the emotional aspects of information seeking and sharing to improve the usability of their products. At the policy level, cultural policy writers and decision-makers can make more informed decisions to support serious leisure.

Originality/value

This study explores the joyful aspects of information behaviour in a unique context. Exploring the joy of information is an emerging topic in human information behaviour scholarship, and the existing knowledge on this issue is still limited. This paper can contribute to creating new knowledge in this emerging area.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Yazdan Mansourian

This paper reports findings from a research project about human information behaviour in the context of serious leisure. Various forms of information activities in this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports findings from a research project about human information behaviour in the context of serious leisure. Various forms of information activities in this context have been identified and categorised to depict common patterns of information seeking, sharing, using and producing.

Design/methodology/approach

The project adopted a qualitative approach in an interpretive paradigm using a thematic analysis method. Data-collection technique was semi-structured interview and 20 volunteers were recruited via a maximum variation sampling strategy. The collected data was transcribed and thematically analysed to identify the main concepts and categories.

Findings

The participants have been experiencing six qualities of serious leisure during their long-term engagement with their hobbies or voluntary jobs and their experiences can be fully mapped onto the serious leisure perspective. The findings also confirmed serious leisure is a unique context in terms of the diversity of information activities embedded into a wide range of individual and collective actions in this context. Information seeking and sharing in serious leisure is not only a source of personal satisfaction for the participants, it also can provide them with a sense of purpose in a meaningful journey towards self-actualization and social inclusion.

Research limitations/implications

The generalisability of the findings needs to be examined in wider populations. Nonetheless, the existing findings can be useful for follow-up research in the area.

Practical implications

This study will be useful in both policy and practice levels. In the policy level, it will be beneficial for cultural policy makers to gain a better understanding about the nature of leisure activities. In the practice level, it will be helpful for serious leisure participants to understand the value of information seeking and sharing in their leisure endeavours. Also, information professionals can use it to enhance the quality of their services for the serious leisure participants who are usually among devoted patrons of libraries, museums, archives and galleries.

Social implications

Learning about serious leisure can provide new insights on people preferences in terms of choosing different entertaining and recreational pursuits – such as indoor and outdoor hobbies – in their free time.

Originality/value

The informational aspects of serious leisure is an emerging and evolving ground of research. This paper provides empirical evidence on this topic from a specific context in the regional areas in Australia.

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Mitra Shabani Nashtaee, Kambiz Heidarzadeh Hanzaei and Yazdan Mansourian

The purpose of this paper is to identify the best interactions between sales promotion and advertisement plans as the resources of the brand attachment and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the best interactions between sales promotion and advertisement plans as the resources of the brand attachment and its consequences in durable and fast-moving consumer goods.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed methods research in the form of qualitative approach, using a phenomenological method and quantitative approach, using three experimental studies of factorial design types and a structural equation modeling method, have been used in this research.

Findings

The fit of plans to achieve the brand attachment is similar in both product categories. The financial gift, with the ability of liquidity and variety of shopping, fits with the advertisement messages at a high construal level and high argument strength. However, the financial gift, with the ability of purchase from particular stores, fits with the advertisement messages at the low construal level and high argument strength. Moreover, in both product categories, the brand attachment leads to the emotional and cognitive consequences.

Originality/value

This research provides experimental support with actual experiences to create a fit in marketing communication plans in order to achieve a lasting and strong relationship. Therefore, this paper offers a valuable insight relating to financial gifts and advertisement messages and their effects on consumers’ behavior. It can also be used by other managers and researchers to assess their communication options.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Yazdan Mansourian

This paper seeks to report selective findings of a wider study to identify the mechanisms that end users employ to overcome their information seeking failure on the web.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report selective findings of a wider study to identify the mechanisms that end users employ to overcome their information seeking failure on the web.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was conducted by semi‐structured and in‐depth interviews. The study adopted a qualitative approach and was carried out based on grounded theory. The biology community at the University of Sheffield was selected as the research population.

Findings

Identified coping strategies are divided into active and passive categories. Active strategies such as revising and help‐seeking require further actions to obtain more satisfactory results. In contrast, passive strategies entail less action to modify the situation and mainly relate to accepting the existing circumstances. Web users prioritise their coping strategies according to the importance of the search topic and their determination to fulfil the search successfully. They develop coping strategies through training courses, using trial and error, knowledge sharing and employing pre‐web coping strategies.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to a small group of web users in academia that cannot be easily considered as an acceptable representative of the heterogeneous population of web users. Moreover, the collected data was based on web users' perception of their search failure rather than an objective measure of it.

Originality/value

Most studies in this area are concerned with users' information seeking behaviour and focus on how people find what they want. However, this paper addresses an aspect of this process that has received little attention up to now. The paper explores users' reaction to, and conceptualisation of, information seeking failure and their coping strategies to overcome the failure in web searching. The findings provide us with a better understanding of users' information seeking behaviour on the web.

Details

Program, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Yazdan Mansourian, Nigel Ford, Sheila Webber and Andrew Madden

This paper aims to encapsulate the main procedure and key findings of a qualitative research on end‐users' interactions with web‐based search tools in order to demonstrate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to encapsulate the main procedure and key findings of a qualitative research on end‐users' interactions with web‐based search tools in order to demonstrate how the concept of “information visibility” emerged and how an integrative model of information visibility and information seeking on the web was constructed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was formed of three parts. The first looked at conceptions of the Invisible Web; the second explored conceptualisations of the causes of search success/failure; the third organised the findings of parts 1 and 2 into a series of theoretical frameworks. Data collection was carried out in three phases based on interviews with a sample of biologists.

Findings

The first part led to the development of a model of information visibility which suggests a complementary definition for the Invisible Web. The results also showed the participants were aware of the possibility that they had missed some relevant information in their searches. However, perceptions of the importance and the volume of missed information varied, so users reacted differently to the possibility that they were missing information. The third part indicated the “Locus of Control” and “Attribution Theory” that can help us to better understand web‐based information seeking patterns. Moreover, “Bounded Rationality” and “Satisficing Theory” supported the inductive findings and showed that users' estimates of the likely volume and importance of missed information affect their decision to persist in searching.

Research limitations/implications

The study creates new understanding of web users' information seeking behaviour which contributes to the theoretical basis of web search research. It also raises various questions within the context of library and information science practice to know whether, and if so how, we can assist end‐users to develop more efficient search strategies and satisfactory approaches.

Originality/value

The research adopted a combination of inductive‐deductive methods with a qualitative approach in the area of information seeking on the web which is mainly dominated by quantitative studies.

Details

Program, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Yazdan Mansourian

This paper seeks to depict an overall picture of an exploratory research journey to exemplify how qualitative studies on little understood phenomena can be done…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to depict an overall picture of an exploratory research journey to exemplify how qualitative studies on little understood phenomena can be done successfully. The paper aims to show how the author adopted an appropriate approach and an apposite methodology to cope with the uncertainty, stress and ambiguity arising during exploratory research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was developed based on a reflective and narrative approach by the author to highlight the pivotal milestones of the reported research. The paper narrates how the research naturally evolved through seven stages including origination, orientation, exploration, elucidation, consolidation, reflection and culmination.

Findings

Dealing with uncertainty and ambiguity is inevitable in exploratory studies. Constant interplay with the data, thorough implementation of the employed methodology and deep involvement with the research context are pivotal elements to achieve success in these studies. Finally, findings from an inductive analysis can be considerably consolidated by deductive re‐analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The paper can inspire novice researchers to tolerate the unavoidable vagueness of early stages in qualitative research. It reassures them to trust the emergence of new horizons if they thoroughly follow an apposite methodology. Nevertheless, what is reported here is based on a personal experience of the author, which cannot easily be generalised to other circumstances.

Originality/value

There are few publications in library and information studies journals based on researchers' reflections on what they have learned in their studies which might be useful for future researchers. Thus, this paper can contribute to the area by illustrating the procedure of an exploratory study which began with high uncertainty but ended with satisfactory results.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Yazdan Mansourian

This paper aims to report the result of follow‐up research on end‐users' conceptions of information visibility on the web and their conceptualizations of success and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the result of follow‐up research on end‐users' conceptions of information visibility on the web and their conceptualizations of success and failure in web searching.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected by a questionnaire followed by a brief interview with the participants. The questionnaire was developed based on the information visibility model suggested by the author in the original study. Fifty‐two library and information sciences students from Tarbiat Mollem University (TMU) and Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) in Tehran took part in the study.

Findings

The model of information visibility can enable web users to gain a better understanding of their information seeking (IS) outcomes and it can assist them to improve their information literacy skills. The model can provide a theoretical framework to investigate web users' IS behavior and can be used as a diagnostic tool to explore the contextual and conceptual elements affecting the visibility of information for end‐users.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests a visibility learning diary (VLD), which might be useful to measure the efficiency of information literacy training courses.

Originality/value

The contextual and conceptual approach of the paper provides a deeper insight into the issue of information visibility, which has received little attention by IS and information retrieval researchers until now.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2008

Yazdan Mansourian

This paper aims to report a number of factors that are perceived by web users as influential elements in their search procedure. The paper introduces a new conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report a number of factors that are perceived by web users as influential elements in their search procedure. The paper introduces a new conceptual measure called “web search efficacy” (hereafter WSE) to evaluate the performance of searches mainly based on users' perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A rich dataset of a wider study was inductively re‐explored to identify different categories that are perceived influential by web users on the final outcome of their searches. A selective review of the literature was carried out to discover to what extent previous research supports the findings of the current study.

Findings

The analysis of the dataset led to the identification of five categories of influential factors. Within each group different factors have been recognized. Accordingly, the concept of WSE has been introduced. The five “Ss” which determine WSE are searcher's performance, search tool's performance, search strategy, search topic, and search situation.

Research limitations/implications

The research body is scattered in different areas and it is difficult to carry out a comprehensive review. The WSE table, which is derived from the empirical data and was supported by previous research, can be employed for further research in various groups of web users.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the area of information seeking on the web by providing researchers with a new conceptual framework to evaluate the efficiency of each search session and identify the underlying factors on the final outcome of web searching.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Yazdan Mansourian

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how using a learning diary can enable researchers to gain a deeper insight into end users’ information searching behaviour and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how using a learning diary can enable researchers to gain a deeper insight into end users’ information searching behaviour and how it can improve users’ search skills as well.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative approach and used a learning diary as its data collection tool. A group of 62 Library and Information Science students from Tarbiat Moallem University in Tehran formed the target group. They were asked to keep a search diary for eight weeks to reflect on their search experiences during that period of time. Moreover, 15 of them participated in a follow‐up interview after handing in their diaries.

Findings

A tentative model was developed to illustrate a number of elements which contribute to the formation of problematic, satisfying and optimal search situations. Moreover keeping a diary was perceived useful by the participants in improving their search skills.

Research limitations/implications

Only 34 of the subjects (54 per cent of the target group) recorded a detailed track of their searches which were suitable for the purpose of this study. The technique employed in this study might be helpful for the information literacy trainers to evaluate the progress of their trainees and to gain a better understanding of their difficulties.

Originality/value

There is little research in the area of information seeking on the web using learning diary as a device to reflect on users’ search behaviour.

Details

Library Review, vol. 57 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Yazdan Mansourian and Andrew D. Madden

The purpose of this paper is to report selective findings from a wider study of web‐based information‐seeking behaviour amongst biologists. It aims to describe: aspects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report selective findings from a wider study of web‐based information‐seeking behaviour amongst biologists. It aims to describe: aspects of the participants' interactions with web‐based search tools; their feelings associated with these interactions, and the different types of searches that they carry out on the web.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by semi‐structured interviews, and were analysed using a grounded theory approach. A qualitative approach was adopted in order to allow deep exploration of the information‐seeking processes adopted by the target group.

Findings

Participants in this study typically categorized their web searches as either work‐related or everyday life searches. They felt more confident carrying out work‐related searches and their search strategies in this category of search were more effective: generally, their work‐related searches were well‐defined and specific. Their everyday life searches covered a wider range of topics, and were occasionally very challenging. Participants carrying out everyday life searches cited as common problems, the selection of apposite search terms, and uncertainty in selecting the most suitable database.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a small sample of academic web users, and it will be useful to carry out follow‐up research using larger samples from biology or other areas of science. Despite this limitation, the findings clearly show the value of allowing users to customise web search facilities. They will also be of value to information literacy instructors developing information skills courses.

Originality/value

Biologists' information‐seeking behaviour on the web has not been investigated before and the paper contributes to the current body of knowledge about information‐seeking behaviour by providing empirical findings relating to the behaviour of this particular group of web users.

Details

New Library World, vol. 108 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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