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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2021

Yazdan Mansourian

This paper provides selective findings from a broader research project on information behaviours in serious leisure. This paper focuses on the positive feelings of

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides selective findings from a broader research project on information behaviours in serious leisure. This paper focuses on the positive feelings of information seeking and sharing in this context, aiming to capture and contextualise the joy of information embedded in and inspired by leisure activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The required data were obtained using semi-structured interviews with 20 serious leisure participants from Wagga Wagga city in Australia, recruited via a maximum variation sampling technique. The data were fully transcribed and analysed based on a qualitative thematic analysis method.

Findings

The joy of information is embedded within a wide spectrum of information activities in serious leisure ranging from information seeking and browsing to information sharing and information creation. Among all these activities, information sharing with peers and a broader audience is the most joyful experience because it often generates social engagement, a sense of belonging and friendship. Moreover, serious leisure is a productive ground to transform hedonic wellness into eudaimonic well-being, while continuous information seeking and sharing play a significant role in achieving this goal.

Practical implications

Information system designers can use the findings to consider the emotional aspects of information seeking and sharing to improve the usability of their products. At the policy level, cultural policy writers and decision-makers can make more informed decisions to support serious leisure.

Originality/value

This study explores the joyful aspects of information behaviour in a unique context. Exploring the joy of information is an emerging topic in human information behaviour scholarship, and the existing knowledge on this issue is still limited. This paper can contribute to creating new knowledge in this emerging area.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Anna Marie Johnson and Hannelore B. Rader

Presents a bibliography of literature published during 2001 on library instruction and information literacy. States that the majority of articles dealt with the

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Abstract

Presents a bibliography of literature published during 2001 on library instruction and information literacy. States that the majority of articles dealt with the implementation of the Association of College and Research Libraries standards for information literacy in higher education. Reveals that another theme is that students are increasingly turning to the Web for their information needs to the exclusion of other sources which has implications for those who teach those resources. Also reveals the theme in the literature of collaboration and partnerships between faculty, information technology staff, other librarians, students and administrators.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Poppy Frances Gibson and Sarah Smith

In a fast-moving world where technology has become intertwined with our daily lives, meaning information is available at our fingertips, information overload (Khabsa and

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Abstract

Purpose

In a fast-moving world where technology has become intertwined with our daily lives, meaning information is available at our fingertips, information overload (Khabsa and Giles, 2014) is just one of many challenges that this technological overhaul has presented for learners from the primary classroom up to studies within higher education (HE). This paper aims to present skills needed by both pupils and students to navigate their information journey, and discusses how educators can support the acquisition and development of these skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on key literature in the fields of education and academia through the process of systematic review and adopting the analogy of a journey to represent lifelong learning, this bipartite paper explores how both primary school pupils and university students are required to access information in their very own information journeys in this “Information Age”.

Findings

The similarities and differences between child and adult learners are considered. This paper shares practical strategies for promoting the smarter use of information – and a shorter journey – for these “travelers” along the way. This paper essentially aims to raise questions in the minds of educators as they help to prepare their learners to learn.

Originality/value

This paper offers an interesting insight for teachers and lecturers as the crossover between two sets of learners, primary-age pupils and students in HE, is considered in terms of how we, as educators, can help to provide more effective and efficient information journeys, and therefore promote successful learning. A five-stage model is presented for the information journey.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Tim Gorichanaz

This paper offers a conceptual discussion of repetition and joy in the context of information and their relation to the good life.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers a conceptual discussion of repetition and joy in the context of information and their relation to the good life.

Design/methodology/approach

Joy is defined as an integrative element of the good life which can be achieved through repetition. This may be surprising, given that our most ready-to-hand associations with “repetition” are negative in tenor rather than positive. Building on the work of repetition theorists Søren Kierkegaard and Gertrude Stein, we can discern three different forms of repetition: that looking backwards (e.g. rereading), that looking forwards (e.g. art-making) and that looking inwards (e.g. chiasmus). Throughout this paper, information-related examples are given and discussed as vignettes that move the conversation forward.

Findings

These examples lead to a nascent theory of why the repetition of information can spark joy and not just tedium. First, its stability and predictability that instill comfort in us. Second, its unifying force that brings us to experience wholeness. Third, its invitation to keep the repetition going through creation, further helping us feel part of the world. And finally, its paradoxicality—as strict repetition is impossible—which requires change, paving the way for satisfying surprises and delights.

Originality/value

Repetition is a ubiquitous and theoretically interesting phenomenon when it comes to information, and though it is implicit in some information science research, it has not yet been theorized directly. Moreover, this paper connects this issue to an emerging “positive” orientation in information studies.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Heatherjean MacNeil, Amanda Wiehe Lopes, Banu Ozkazanc-Pan and Anne Douglass

The information presented in this case was gathered through interviews and observations carried out during the time Ms Joy attended the Initiative for A Competitive Inner…

Abstract

Research methodology

The information presented in this case was gathered through interviews and observations carried out during the time Ms Joy attended the Initiative for A Competitive Inner City business support program in 2017. In addition, focus groups that took place after the program provided important information and insights into her decision-making process and business goals. Additional interviews were conducted in 2018 and 2019 after the business program ended to gain in-depth knowledge of Ms Joy’s entrepreneurial journey.

Case overview/synopsis

This case details the experiences of Winsome Joy in recognizing market opportunities in the child care industry and then expanding into the educational materials industry. The case focuses on challenges related to founding and sustaining her business and the ways in which Ms Joy engaged in “opportunity recognition” and “effectuation” to become a successful entrepreneur. The case points out the challenges of the child care and early education field in terms of professional training, hiring practices and retaining qualified staff. It provides an aspirational role model who has overcome these challenges by finding and recognizing new market opportunities.

Complexity academic level

This case is relevant for undergraduate and graduate courses in entrepreneurship.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2022

Ya Yin and Carol Hsu

Today, contactless businesses are becoming part of the “new normal” in daily life. Augmented reality-based services (ARBS) thus provide a mechanism for contactless…

Abstract

Purpose

Today, contactless businesses are becoming part of the “new normal” in daily life. Augmented reality-based services (ARBS) thus provide a mechanism for contactless commerce, offering customers access to sensory experiences, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, privacy can be a key concern when consumers decide whether to continue using ARBS. Thus, drawing on the Appraisal Tendency Framework (ATF), the study aims to examine how augmentation quality (Aug-Q), discrete emotions (joy and frustration) and privacy perceptions influence users' ARBS continuing use intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey methodology with a well-designed online questionnaire was used for data collection. The data were analyzed using a structural equation model with Amos v. 22.0 software.

Findings

This study demonstrated that Aug-Q had a significant positive impact on joy and a significant negative impact on frustration. Additionally, joy was positively associated with the perception of privacy benefits and ARBS continuing use intention, while frustration was negatively associated with the perception of privacy benefits and ARBS continuing use intention. The results also indicate that (perceived privacy risks) PPR–benefits predict the likelihood of ARBS continuing use intention.

Originality/value

This study enhances understanding of users' ARBS continuing use intention from an integrative perspective based on the ATF, thus identifying the Aug-Q-induced emotions that subsequently influence privacy trade-offs and predict users' ARBS continuing use intention. The results provide evidence that privacy and emotions can be key determinants when consumers decide whether to continue using ARBS. The findings of this research may be beneficial for commercial companies in preventing the loss of ARBS users.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Hanna Berg, Magnus Söderlund and Annika Lindström

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer response to pictures of smiling models in marketing, focusing on the roles of emotional contagion from the smiling models…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer response to pictures of smiling models in marketing, focusing on the roles of emotional contagion from the smiling models and the perceived typicality of marketing with smiling models.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports the findings from three experimental studies, comparing consumer response to two versions of an advertisement (Study 1) and a packaging design (Study 2 and 3), including either a picture of a smiling or a non-smiling model. To measure consumer response, a combination of self-report questionnaires and eye-tracking methodology was used.

Findings

The pictures of smiling models produced more consumer joy and more positive attitudes for the marketing. The positive effects on attitudes were mediated by consumer joy, and the effects on consumer joy were mediated by the perceived typicality of the marketing with smiling models.

Originality/value

Despite the ubiquity of photos of smiling faces in marketing, very few studies have isolated the effects of the smile appeal on consumer response to marketing objects. By comparing marketing where the same model is shown smiling or with a neutral facial expression, the positive effects were isolated. The roles of emotional contagion and perceived typicality in this mechanism were also examined and implications of the findings for research and practitioners are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Man Lai Cheung, Hiram Ting, Jun-Hwa Cheah and Mohamad-Noor Salehhuddin Sharipudin

Using the stimulus-organism-response model as the theoretical basis, the purpose of this study is to examine the impact of a social media-based destination brand community…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using the stimulus-organism-response model as the theoretical basis, the purpose of this study is to examine the impact of a social media-based destination brand community (SMDBC) on tourists’ emotions, and the subsequent effect on the intention to co-create value and visit.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework was tested using survey data from 551 Chinese social media users who were followers of Japanese social media pages. Partial least squares–structural equation modelling was adopted to perform the latent variable analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that SMDBC plays a considerable role in shaping tourists’ emotions, including joy, love and positive surprise, which, in turn, have a significant impact on consumers’ intention to co-create value and visit. Contrary to previous studies, the effect of joy on tourists’ intention to co-create and visit is found to be insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

The present study elucidates the importance and relevance of SMDBC in evoking tourists’ positive emotions, and subsequently their intention to co-create value and visit. Future research is recommended to compare and contrast SMDBC with other marketing and branding activities to provide greater insights into the phenomenon in a dynamic environment.

Practical implications

This study enables academics and business practitioners to better comprehend the effectiveness of SMDBC in driving tourists’ favourable assessment and behavioural intentions to improve resource allocation. In particular, destination marketers are recommended to optimise SMDBC and encourage discussion on SMDBC among users.

Originality/value

As literature in relation to the importance of SMDBC in evoking tourists’ emotions incorporating its link with tourists’ intention to co-create value and visit is relatively scarce, this study contributes to the branding and destination tourism research by empirically articulating the relevance of SMDBC in stimulating tourists’ emotions and subsequently value co-creation and visit intention.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2020

Ling Zhang, Jie Wei and Robert J. Boncella

Microblogging is an important channel used to disseminate online public opinion during an emergency. Analyzing the features and evolution mechanism of online public…

Abstract

Purpose

Microblogging is an important channel used to disseminate online public opinion during an emergency. Analyzing the features and evolution mechanism of online public opinion during an emergency plays a significant role in crisis management.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the event of Hurricane Irma and combines it with the life cycle of online public opinion evolution to understand the effect of different types of emotional (joy, anger, sadness, fear, disgust) microblogs (tweets) on information dissemination. The research was performed in the context of Hurricane Irma by using tweets associated with that event.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that negative emotional information has a greater communication effect, and further, the target audience that receives more exposure to negative emotional microblogs has a stronger tendency to retweet. Meanwhile, emotions expressed in tweets and the life cycle of public opinion evolution exert interactive effects on the retweeting behavior of the target audience.

Research limitations/implications

For future research, a professional dictionary and the context should be taken into consideration to make the modeling in the text more normative and analyzable.

Practical implications

This paper aims to reveal how the emotions of a tweet affect its virality in terms of diffusion volume in the context of an emergency event.

Social implications

The conclusion made in this paper can shed light on the real-time regulation and public opinion transmission, as well as for efficient intelligence service and emergency management.

Originality/value

In this study, Hurricane Irma is taken as an example to explore the factors influencing the information dissemination during emergencies on the social media environment. The relationship between the sentiment of a tweet and the life cycle of public opinion and its effect on tweet volume were investigated.

Article
Publication date: 13 December 2018

Jacob Hornik, Rinat Shaanan Satchi and Matti Rachamim

Recent research on word-of-mouth (WOM) has presented consistent evidence on the importance of secondary WOM (sWOM) on online user-generated content (UGC) and on diffusion…

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Abstract

Purpose

Recent research on word-of-mouth (WOM) has presented consistent evidence on the importance of secondary WOM (sWOM) on online user-generated content (UGC) and on diffusion of positive and negative commercial information. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what motivates consumers to spread, via electronic WOM communication, negative information about commercial entities adversity using malicious verbal narratives. Based on concepts related to the joy of pain (schadenfreude) and gloating behavior the authors propose a set of hypotheses designed to test two key moderators (perceived deservingness and entity’s status) as well as the process of spiteful dissemination like content assimilation, dissemination time and duration.

Design/methodology/approach

The research consists on a series of four studies using different research methods (surveys and experiments) and a mix of quantitative and qualitative analyses.

Findings

Results show that actively communicating about others’ adversity (i.e. gloating behavior) provides an outlet to the passive observation of others’ adversity (i.e. schadenfreude feelings). Results indicate that schadenfreude and gloating are linked to the perceived deservingness of a commercial entity and entity status (the tall poppy syndrome). Results also show that malicious feelings and gloating behavior cause consumers to disseminate information more widely, more rapidly, for a longer period and frequently distort its content.

Research limitations/implications

The findings contribute to literature on WOM by introducing an approach that highlights the potential negative effects of WOM on the dissemination of commercial information that might harm the relevant commercial entity’s reputation and goodwill.

Originality/value

This study illuminates the prevalence of negative rhetoric in WOM and supports the theory schadenfreude motives as a trigger for gloating behavior in the form of disseminating negative, malicious and intense WOM regarding commercial setbacks. This research is the first to examine and demonstrates that when it comes to WOM communication, schadenfreude feelings and gloating behavior might play a central role in the dissemination of negative information and the two constructs’ role in understanding infostorms, the sudden flow of large quantities of negative WOM using strong gleeful exultation. This study is the first to examine these phenomena in the business setting.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 8000