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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2013

Steve Bagi

What happens when leaders are unable to keep leading? Leaders are often expected to be enthusiastic, innovative and help lead their organization forward. However…

Abstract

What happens when leaders are unable to keep leading? Leaders are often expected to be enthusiastic, innovative and help lead their organization forward. However, sometimes they can find themselves so emotionally and physically depleted that they are unable to function, even at the most basic level. Years of stress, heavy responsibilities, personal issues and unhealthy work hours can take a toll in the form of ‘burnout’. The battery is flat and the car cannot start. There are many contributing factors to burnout. It comes at a high cost to the leader, his family and his organization. This chapter will look at the nature of burnout and examine how the leader’s personality, work role, leadership style and life experiences can all contribute to the development of this condition. The impact of burnout, pathways to recovery and some preventative measures will also be examined combining current research findings with the author’s own experience of burnout. This chapter aims to highlight the need for leaders to look after themselves and for organizations to help support their leaders in an effective way. Although recovery from burnout may be a difficult and long journey, leaders can regain their strength and motivation and return to the role stronger and with more effective coping strategies.

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Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Monica Colon-Aguirre and Katy Kavanagh Webb

The main purpose of this work is to uncover and identify the issues that academic librarians consider important in the attainment of work–life balance. This work will…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this work is to uncover and identify the issues that academic librarians consider important in the attainment of work–life balance. This work will focus on exploring their experiences with different dimensions of burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

The topic of burnout is explored by analyzing the results of a survey based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), which was distributed among librarians at a group academic institutions that are members of the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL).

Findings

The findings of this study do not demonstrate evidence of burnout among the sample population. However, the results do present plenty of opportunities for further exploration such as the relationship between burnout and personal factors, including LGBTQA + status and race or ethnic minority status.

Research limitations/implications

Further exploration of the topic of burnout should be followed up with more qualitative studies, especially those employing interviews.

Practical implications

Improvement of human resource practices, which reduces the incidence of burnout among academic librarians, is something that can only be accomplished at the organizational level. Human resource practices can create a work environment that enhances productivity by improving the quality of life of employees.

Originality/value

This work explores and assesses academic librarian burnout, among those working in academic institutions in the southeastern United States. To date, no study has been undertaken that looks at burnout across broad types of work performed by academic librarians and librarians at different institutions.

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Kim-Lim Tan, Tek-Yew Lew and Adriel K.S. Sim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of meaningful work against dimensions of job burnout, with psychological capital (PsyCap) as the mediator.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of meaningful work against dimensions of job burnout, with psychological capital (PsyCap) as the mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 223 social workers were analyzed using the partial least squares–structural equation modeling.

Findings

As expected, meaningful work displayed a positive, direct and significant relationship with PsyCap. Contrary to expectations, meaningful work did not establish a negative direct relationship with all, but one dimension of job burnout. However, the results showed that it had indirect relationships with all job burnout dimensions through PsyCap where it displayed a mediating influence over the relationship.

Practical implications

Given the malleable attributes of PsyCap and the results showing meaningful work being a strong predictor of PsyCap, this study suggests that organizations should focus on imbuing greater meaningfulness in work to improve social workers’ PsyCap, which is essential in reducing their propensity for experiencing job burnout.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to explore in detail the effects of meaningful work on the dimensions of job burnout, with PsyCap being the mediator. This study has advanced the body of knowledge on meaningful work by contesting the claim that meaningful work was an effective predictor in reducing job burnout. In addition, this study has extended the understanding of the upward-spiral concept and the resource caravan concept.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Laura D. Robinson, Christopher Magee and Peter Caputi

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether work-to-family conflict (WFC) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE) predicted burnout in working mothers using conservation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether work-to-family conflict (WFC) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE) predicted burnout in working mothers using conservation of resources theory. The authors also examined whether these relationships varied between sole and partnered working mothers.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 516 partnered and 107 sole mothers in paid employment completed an online survey twice, six months apart.

Findings

WFC was significantly positively related to burnout, and WFE significantly negatively related to burnout. Marital status moderated the inverse relationship between WFE and personal burnout, and this relationship was significant for partnered mothers only.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include self-report data, and the sample being highly educated thereby limiting generalizability.

Practical implications

Providing an enriching and supportive work environment may be an important strategy for minimizing burnout in mothers, particularly for sole mothers.

Social implications

Employed sole mother’s risks of burnout may be higher than for other mothers even when experiencing WFE, which can have implications for their functioning and for family well-being.

Originality/value

This two-wave study is the first to highlight that sole mothers, who are at risk of greater socio-economic disadvantages, do not benefit from WFE to the same degree as partnered mothers. Future work-family and burnout research should further examine differences based family structure.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Min-Shi Liu, Mei-Ling Wang and Chun Hsien Lee

The purpose of this study is to examine the indirect impact of job demands on recovery self-efficacy via the mediation of job burnout. The study also investigates the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the indirect impact of job demands on recovery self-efficacy via the mediation of job burnout. The study also investigates the moderating effects of school-to-work facilitation and psychological detachment in the indirect relationship between job demands and recovery self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study recruited and surveyed 263 employed graduate students in the executive master of business administration program in Taiwan. Regression analysis was used to examine the proposed relationships.

Findings

The results showed that job burnout mediated the relationship between job demands and recovery self-efficacy. The relationship was weaker when school-to-work facilitation and psychological detachment were high.

Originality/value

This study confirms the indirect effects of job demands on recover self-efficacy through job burnout and provides new insights into the role of school-to-work facilitation and psychological detachment to enhance the recovery in the JD-R model.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2012

Nadia Botma and Cara Jonker

The objective of this study was to develop and test a structural model of psychological wellness of human resource employees in a platinum and steel production environment…

Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop and test a structural model of psychological wellness of human resource employees in a platinum and steel production environment in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey design was utilized in this study. An availability sample (N=465) was taken from human resource employees in a platinum and steel production environment. The Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Frankfurt Emotion Work Scale, Greek Emotional Intelligence Scale, and Social Support Scale were administered. The results obtained from structural equation modeling showed that emotional intelligence and social support are negatively related to emotion work and burnout, and positively related to engagement, which means that employees with emotional intelligence and social support will be less likely to experience negative effects of emotion work and burnout and more likely to experience work engagement. Results also indicated that emotion work is positively related to burnout, meaning that emotion work leads to burnout.

Details

Experiencing and Managing Emotions in the Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-676-8

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

María Beatriz Quintanilla-Madero

Burnout syndrome is characterized by exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy. Considered a work–stress-related condition, burnout first described professional activities that…

Abstract

Burnout syndrome is characterized by exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy. Considered a work–stress-related condition, burnout first described professional activities that provide a direct service to people, such as the health and teaching professions. Recent scholarship, however, points to the existence of burnout in any kind of work and at any level of the organization. Some have noted a high prevalence of burnout in the general population, and especially increased prevalence among healthcare professionals. This chapter thus aims to analyze burnout syndrome, including its detection and prevention in organizations. It will proceed by reviewing classic and recent scientific literature on burnout, and its impact on the individual and the organization. It also evaluates organizational interventions meant to prevent burnout and help employees, as well as assess some coping strategies employees can take up to develop a healthier relationship with their jobs.

Details

Strategy, Power and CSR: Practices and Challenges in Organizational Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-973-6

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Maria Tresita Paul V, Nimitha Aboobaker and Uma Devi N

Drawing from the work-home resources model and the conservation of resources theory, this study examines the potential of family incivility in instigating burnout and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the work-home resources model and the conservation of resources theory, this study examines the potential of family incivility in instigating burnout and reduced job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed structured questionnaires to collect data from a sample of 290 doctors working in tertiary care hospitals across India. Measurement modeling was done using IBM AMOS 23.0 and PROCESS macro was employed for hypothesis testing.

Findings

The study revealed that family incivility has a positive spillover effect on burnout, subsequently leading to lowered levels of job satisfaction. Furthermore, burnout mediated the aforementioned relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, and a longitudinal study will help test more rigorously; the causal relationships between the focal variables are recommended. Self-report data pose limitations concerning common method bias. Data collected from different occupations and cultures would help with further generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

This study establishes that incivility within the family can negatively affect various vital work outcomes. Accordingly, it is recommended for organizations to support employees to achieve improved work-family integration. Further research should explore various coping strategies that will help with mitigating these spillover effects.

Social implications

This study offers a new perspective on the negative effect of family interactions on work-domain outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper extends the scholarly literature on stress and work-family interface by demonstrating that family incivility has spillover effects. This is the pioneering study that examines family incivility as a home demand causing long-term severe damages at work.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Carolyn Timms, Paula Brough and Deborah Graham

This research sought to identify groups of school employees who were more similar in their responses to burnout and engagement measures, for the purpose of exploring what…

Abstract

Purpose

This research sought to identify groups of school employees who were more similar in their responses to burnout and engagement measures, for the purpose of exploring what was similar in their school experiences. The profiles created in the present research enable a clearer appreciation of what is common to groups of school employees who are experiencing empowerment, ambivalence or distress in their work environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research used K‐means cluster analysis to identify school employees (n=953) who were most similar in regard to levels of burnout and engagement in order to achieve some sense of what was common at a group level.

Findings

This process identified five distinct respondent profiles using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI) and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES). Subsequent MANOVA analyses identified significant differences between cluster groups on the six areas of work‐life (control, workload, reward, community, fairness and values) and hours of work.

Practical implications

One of the most pressing problems faced by school administrators is that of identifying the most appropriate and strategic interventions to use with teaching staff in order to maintain motivation in the face of work pressures. The current research provides some practical insights into the experiences of school employees that may provide direction for such administrators.

Originality/value

By grouping respondents with similar attitudes towards their work this research has provided for more insight into the experiences to those respondents who do not fall at either end of the burnout‐engagement continuum. As such it provides for more effective intervention strategies with employees who are at‐risk.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Kam Jugdev, Gita Mathur and Christian Cook

Given the demanding and stressful nature of project work, with a view to explore established concepts of burnout within the project management context, the purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the demanding and stressful nature of project work, with a view to explore established concepts of burnout within the project management context, the purpose of this paper is to examine two instruments: the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS). Since there is a paucity of literature in project management anchored within the MBI and the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS), this paper proposes a high-level model on burnout in project management, drawing on the literature underlying these two instruments.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a conceptual approach, the paper reviews the social psychology literature on burnout and then the narrow stream of literature on burnout in project management. The paper develops and proposes a conceptual model as a foundation to explore the links between the determinants of project manager burnout/engagement and turnover/retention.

Findings

This paper contributes to an improved understanding of the determinants of project manager burnout, engagement, turnover, and retention.

Practical implications

The driver for this research is to contribute to the emerging literature on burnout in project management and strategies to help improve engagement and retention of project managers in the discipline – specifically, their tenure in organizations and/or the profession.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the topic of burnout in the project management context. An improved understanding of the stressors in project management contexts, and the mechanisms to mitigate the stress, can add to our understanding of project manager well-being, engagement and retention, improved project success, and healthier work environments.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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