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1 – 10 of 247
Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Philip Cook and Wendy Gallagher

754

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Philip Cook and Wendy Gallagher

701

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Nancy Graber Pigeon, Wendy Cook and James L. Nimnicht

The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a difference between same vs opposite sex pairings in the mentor‐protégé relationship when it comes to salary and…

944

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a difference between same vs opposite sex pairings in the mentor‐protégé relationship when it comes to salary and levels within the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 612 manager/non‐manager dyads with all non‐managers being female. The organization was located in the Northwest section of the United States and was a large Fortune 500 manufacturing firm. All levels of the organization were utilized from entry level positions to vice presidents to measure how women fared under female vs male mentors.

Findings

Women with female mentor supervisors earn less than with male mentor supervisors. The disparity is even greater the younger the protégée. If the trend shown in this research continues, wages may drop for women in high levels of the organization with same‐ sex mentees.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this research is the operationalization of a manager as a mentor. Supervisors were used as the mentor in most examples. Even if the participants in the study had self‐selected their mentors, it would still be expected that the participants would be successful. Another limitation to this research is that there was no direct assessment of the perceptions of the mentor/protégé relationship among the participants. More research needs to be done to understand why these trends were found which might include looking at personality traits, various characteristics, immutable traits, etc. Additionally, experimental longitudinal research should be done to arrive at a definitive conclusion. This research provides the impetus to study the phenomenon cross culturally, outside of the northwest and outside of the USA, etc.

Practical implications

The practical implications for management may be that having women moving up the organizational hierarchy without the appropriate pay increase may save the company money in labor costs. But, as women recognize the disparity in income, they may request opposite sex mentors vs same sex mentors which may be a self‐limiting factor for organizations promoting women into higher level positions in the organization. Therefore, they may promote fewer women which would decrease their diversity efforts.

Originality/value

Many researchers have reviewed the relationship between a mentee and a more seasoned organizational member. Formal and informal mentoring systems have been studied as well reviewing many variables. The research reviewing same vs opposite sex pairings in the mentor/protégé relationship demonstrates conflicting findings. This paper tests the result in salary and organizational level that the female protégé rises to if they have a female mentor vs male mentor.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2016

Adelina Broadbridge and Sharon Anne Mavin

3099

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Douglas M. Lambert and Matthew A. Schwieterman

Increasingly, supplier relationship management (SRM) is being viewed as strategic, process‐oriented, cross‐functional, and value‐creating for buyer and seller, and a means of…

15065

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, supplier relationship management (SRM) is being viewed as strategic, process‐oriented, cross‐functional, and value‐creating for buyer and seller, and a means of achieving superior financial performance. This paper seeks to describe a macro level cross‐functional view of SRM and to provide a structure for managing business‐to‐business relationships to co‐create value and increase shareholder value.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to identify the sub‐processes of SRM at the strategic and operational levels as well as the activities that comprise each sub‐process, focus group sessions were conducted with executives from a range of industries. The focus groups were supplemented with visits to companies identified in the focus groups as having the most advanced SRM practices.

Findings

The research resulted in a framework that managers can use to implement a cross‐functional, cross‐firm, SRM process in business‐to‐business relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on focus groups with executives in 15 companies representing nine industries and multiple positions in the supply chain, including retailers, distributors, manufacturers and suppliers. While all companies had global operations, only one was based outside of the USA. Nevertheless, the framework has been presented in executive seminars in North and South America, Europe, Asia and Australia with very positive feedback.

Practical implications

The framework can be used by managers and has been successfully implemented in large corporations. The view of SRM presented involves all business functions, which extends the current thinking.

Originality/value

The framework includes all business functions and was developed with input from executives representing major corporations with global operations.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

David Lindsay, Daryl Brennan, Daniel Lindsay, Colin Holmes and Wendy Smyth

The purpose of this paper is to describe the patterns of self-disclosure of long-term conditions at work by health professionals in a large regional health service. Recent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the patterns of self-disclosure of long-term conditions at work by health professionals in a large regional health service. Recent research by the authors has reported on the self-reported long-term conditions of nursing, medical and allied health staff within a large regional hospital and health service in North Queensland, Australia. Data regarding self-disclosure of health information were gathered during those two previous studies, but has yet to be reported. This current study thus offers the opportunity to explore and describe patterns of self-disclosure by a multi-disciplinary cohort of health professionals within that regional health service.

Design/methodology/approach

This current study was a component of two larger studies, reported elsewhere, which explored long-term conditions among health professional staff at a large regional health service in North Queensland, Australia. A cross-sectional survey design was used.

Findings

Decision-making associated with self-disclosure of long-term conditions by health professional staff in the workplace is multifactorial, and affected by considerations of age, gender, workplace circumstances and nature of the health condition. It also differs according to professional grouping. The medical profession were less likely than nurses and allied health workers to disclose to their work colleagues. Respondents with a mental health condition were more cautious and selective in their disclosures, and alone in being more likely to disclose to their supervisor than to colleagues; they were also most likely to value the sympathy and understanding of their colleagues and managers.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted across only one large regional health service; a fuller picture of patterns of self-disclosure of long-term conditions by health professional staff would be gained by expanding the number of sites to include metropolitan hospitals, smaller rural or remote health services and non-hospital settings.

Practical implications

Healthcare organizations need to develop support strategies and communication processes so that staff with one or more long-term condition, particularly those that have associated stigma, are empowered to disclose information to line managers and colleagues without fear of discrimination, ostracism, incivility or bullying.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of evidence about self-disclosure of long-term conditions by health professionals and this study therefore makes an important contribution to the extant literature. The findings raise important questions about the culture and dynamics of health care organizations in respect to the patterns of self-disclosure of health professional staff.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Charlotte Laura Clarke, Mike Titterton, Jane Wilcockson, Jane Reed, Wendy Moyle, Barbara Klein, Sandra Marais and Glenda Cook

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experience of older people and their sense of developing wellbeing, including consideration of the strategies they employ to respond to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experience of older people and their sense of developing wellbeing, including consideration of the strategies they employ to respond to perceived risk.

Design/methodology/approach

An Appreciative Inquiry study was used, which collected data with 58 participants in focus group and individual interviews. Interviews focussed on ways in which older people in South Africa, Australia, Germany and the UK understand and seek to maintain wellbeing.

Findings

The changing time horizons of older people lead to perceptions of risk and concerns that embrace societal as well as individual concerns. Often, this leads to a sense of societal responsibility and desire for social change, which is frustrated by a perceived exclusion from participation in society.

Social implications

In mental health practice and education, it is imperative to embrace the shift from ageist concerns (with later life viewed as risky and tragic in itself) towards a greater sensitivity for older people’s resilience, the strategies they deploy to maintain this, and their desire for more control and respect for their potential to contribute to society.

Originality/value

Variation in time horizons leads to changes in temporal accounting, which may be under-utilised by society. Consequently, societies may not recognise and support the resilience of older people to the detriment of older people as individuals and to the wider society.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Martine Stead, Martin Caraher, Wendy Wrieden, Patricia Longbottom, Karen Valentine and Annie Anderson

One of the many barriers to a healthier diet in low‐income communities is a presumed lack of practical food skills. This article reports findings from exploratory qualitative…

3010

Abstract

One of the many barriers to a healthier diet in low‐income communities is a presumed lack of practical food skills. This article reports findings from exploratory qualitative research conducted with potential participants in a cooking skills intervention, in low income communities in Scotland. The research found widely varying levels of skill and confidence regarding cooking, supported the need for a community‐based intervention approach, and demonstrated the importance of consumer research to inform the content of interventions. Challenges the view that low income communities lack skills, suggesting that food skills should be defined more broadly than “cooking from scratch”. Other barriers to healthy eating, such as poverty, food access and taste preferences, remain important.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2023

Jill Wales, Glenda Cook and Cathy Bailey

This paper aims to explore the perceptions and experiences of a group of extra care tenants, who, as novice internet users, began to maintain their social relationships online…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the perceptions and experiences of a group of extra care tenants, who, as novice internet users, began to maintain their social relationships online. Housing transitions in later life may jeopardise existing social relationships, leading to loneliness and social isolation. More recently, Covid-19 restrictions have limited familial face-to-face contact and wider social interactions. Thus, extra care tenants, who are not already online, may benefit from acquiring internet skills. This paper aims to enhance understanding of the participants’ transition from novices to experienced internet users and the impact on their social relationships and sense of self.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal, hermeneutic phenomenological study was conducted over eight months in two extra care housing schemes in north east England. Ten participants (56–98 years) with age-related physical, sensory and cognitive losses were recruited to the study. A series of semi-structured interviews and participant diaries captured the participants’ experience as they developed internet skills and communicated online.

Findings

All participants, including a blind individual, learnt to communicate online. Personalised adaptive strategies, peer support, training and management involvement facilitated internet uptake. Participants felt their social relationships were supported, and they regained biographical continuity, through being and feeling they belonged in the modern digital world.

Originality/value

The online experiences of extra care tenants are rarely voiced. Their perceptions may assist others to engage online, maintaining social connections, which could otherwise be lost.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2019

Kathy Lee Wright, Karen Verney, Daryl Brennan, David Lindsay, Daniel Lindsay and Wendy Smyth

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the long-term conditions affecting the administration workforce of a regional Australian health service, and their self-management of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the long-term conditions affecting the administration workforce of a regional Australian health service, and their self-management of these conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey design was used. The sample consisted of all administration staff members employed in 2018 across a large regional health service in Northern Australia.

Findings

Of the 328 respondents, 167 (51 per cent) reported having at least one long-term condition. Of these, 136 (81.4 per cent) indicated a single main condition for which management strategies were used. Musculoskeletal conditions were the most commonly nominated category (59.6 per cent), followed by mental health (10.3 per cent). Respondents with musculoskeletal conditions were statistically more likely to have a co-existing mental health long-term condition, χ2(1) = 95.64, p<0.001. There was also a statistically significant association between respondents reporting a mental health condition and being overweight, χ2(1) = 54.27, p< 0.05.

Research limitations/implications

The response rate of 35 per cent, whilst relatively low, is a slight increase on similar surveys within this organisation. The reliability of the self-report data, presence of study bias and a weakening of the study’s external validity is acknowledged.

Practical implications

Targeted workplace intervention strategies, such as holistic wellness programs, should complement personal approaches, promote an ergonomic environment and create opportunities for increased dialogue between employees and their line managers, particularly regarding the complex interplay between long-term physical and mental health.

Originality/value

This is the first study of self-reported long-term conditions among administration staff within a health service, and augments findings from previous studies involving health professional groups in the same organisation.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

1 – 10 of 247