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1 – 10 of over 52000
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Fu Jia, Ruihong Gao, Richard Lamming and Richard Wilding

This paper aims to identify problems caused by cultural differences between Japan and China that face supply chain managers by applying Japanese-style supply management

1964

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify problems caused by cultural differences between Japan and China that face supply chain managers by applying Japanese-style supply management practices within supply networks in China and present solutions to this problem.

Design/methodology/approach

A single, longitudinal case study conducting two waves of data collection (i.e. interviews and observation) plus the collection of much archival data was performed. It goes beyond the dyad by examining supply management of a Japanese company’s supply chain up to three tiers in China.

Findings

The four supply cultural differences between Japan and China, which caused the cultural clashes between JVCo and some of its suppliers were revealed and a model of adaptation of Japanese supply management to the Chinese business system was developed. Adaptation involves creating new supply management practices out of selective adaptation, innovation and change of existing Japanese and Chinese supply management practices rooted in different Japanese, Chinese and Western cultures. A list of organisational factors affecting the adaptation has also been provided.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the adoption of a single case study method, caution should be given to generalising the findings to all Japanese firms.

Practical implications

The Japanese, Chinese and Western managers were provided with insights on how to mitigate the problems caused by cultural differences within supply relationships in China and some innovative ideas on how managers from all three cultures could blend the elements of the three cultures to form a hybrid culture and reduce cultural clashes.

Originality/value

This is one of the few attempts to study the transfer of Japanese supply management practice to China. Organizational theory (i.e. transfer of organizational practice and hybridization) is applied and provides a robust framework to explain the supply management practice. This study also answers the call for a global supplier relationship management paradigm.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Roberta Pellegrino, Nicola Costantino and Danilo Tauro

This paper provides a comprehensive risk management framework for buyer-supplier relationships where the buyer has the status of a preferred customer with the supplier.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides a comprehensive risk management framework for buyer-supplier relationships where the buyer has the status of a preferred customer with the supplier.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical evidence is offered with a case study on a large multinational organization in the Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) industry, with some real-life perspectives on the main risks, mitigation strategies, and issues faced when applying the risk management framework.

Findings

The results show that several risks may affect buyer-supplier relationships: not only traditional supply risks but also risks linked to specific initiatives and/or relationships, as well as risks specific to buyer-supplier relationships with a preferred customer status. Customer attractiveness and supplier satisfaction are found as core drivers for the mitigation strategies, which are built to protect the relationship with the supplier, rather than the buying firm alone, knowing that being a preferred customer with preferential resources allocation may increase a firm’s competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The research brings important contributions to the academic literature and interesting insights to strategic purchasing practitioners, by enhancing the existing knowledge on supply risk management in buyer-supplier relationships with a preferred customer status, as well as providing strategic purchasing practitioners a comprehensive view of the risks, which may affect the relationships with a preferred customer status, as well as possible ways to mitigate them.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Douglas M. Lambert and Matthew A. Schwieterman

Increasingly, supplier relationship management (SRM) is being viewed as strategic, process‐oriented, cross‐functional, and value‐creating for buyer and seller, and a means…

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Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, supplier relationship management (SRM) is being viewed as strategic, process‐oriented, cross‐functional, and value‐creating for buyer and seller, and a means of achieving superior financial performance. This paper seeks to describe a macro level cross‐functional view of SRM and to provide a structure for managing business‐to‐business relationships to co‐create value and increase shareholder value.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to identify the sub‐processes of SRM at the strategic and operational levels as well as the activities that comprise each sub‐process, focus group sessions were conducted with executives from a range of industries. The focus groups were supplemented with visits to companies identified in the focus groups as having the most advanced SRM practices.

Findings

The research resulted in a framework that managers can use to implement a cross‐functional, cross‐firm, SRM process in business‐to‐business relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on focus groups with executives in 15 companies representing nine industries and multiple positions in the supply chain, including retailers, distributors, manufacturers and suppliers. While all companies had global operations, only one was based outside of the USA. Nevertheless, the framework has been presented in executive seminars in North and South America, Europe, Asia and Australia with very positive feedback.

Practical implications

The framework can be used by managers and has been successfully implemented in large corporations. The view of SRM presented involves all business functions, which extends the current thinking.

Originality/value

The framework includes all business functions and was developed with input from executives representing major corporations with global operations.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Eric P. Jack and Thomas L. Powers

The purpose of this paper was to examine the antecedents of strategic supplier relationships in conjunction with outcomes of product and service quality and financial…

3198

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the antecedents of strategic supplier relationships in conjunction with outcomes of product and service quality and financial performance. The management of strategic supplier relationships involves the selection and development of suppliers that share common goals and strategies of the partnering organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling using partial least squares is used to verify and test these relationships.

Findings

Top management support, technological preparedness and trust were found to have significant positive influences on the management of strategic supplier relationships. Strategic supplier relationships were found to have a positive influence on product and service quality outcomes and financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The results provide new and original empirical evidence on the relationship between the antecedents and outcomes of strategic supplier relationships.

Practical implications

The findings can contribute to the management of supplier relationships, resulting in improved product and service quality outcomes and financial performance.

Originality/value

The research adds empirical evidence to the literature on the factors that contribute to effective supplier relationships and the customer- and firm-related outcomes of this process.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2022

Mary-Ann Mallet, Kwame Owusu Kwateng and Dorcas Nuertey

This study aims to assess the effect of supplier–buyer association on supply chain sustainability using the pharmaceutical industry in Ghana as a case study.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the effect of supplier–buyer association on supply chain sustainability using the pharmaceutical industry in Ghana as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a quantitative research approach. The study design was a cross-sectional survey design. The unit of analysis for the study was top-level managers of pharmaceutical companies in Ghana. By the use of the purposive and convenience sampling techniques, 90 respondents from pharmaceutical firms in Ghana were included. The study used descriptive statistics, t-test and regression tools in the data analysis.

Findings

It was discovered that trust mediates positively the relationship between supplier–buyer relationship and supply chain sustainability. Moreover, the study found that supplier–buyer relationship (SBR) has a significant and positive impact on supply chain sustainability.

Practical implications

The study concluded that SBR is the foundation upon which effective supply chain and supply chain sustainability are established.

Originality/value

This paper provides researchers with a contemporary perspective toward understanding the relationship between SBR and supply chain sustainability and the mediating role of trust.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Yiyi Fan, Mark Stevenson and Fang Li

The aim of the study is to explore how two dimensions of interpersonal relationships (i.e. size and range of relationships) affect supplier-initiating risk management

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to explore how two dimensions of interpersonal relationships (i.e. size and range of relationships) affect supplier-initiating risk management behaviours (SIRMB) and supply-side resilience. Further, the study aims to explore the moderating role of dependence asymmetry.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine hypotheses are tested based on a moderated mediation analysis of survey data from 247 manufacturing firms in China. The data are validated using a subset of 57 attentive secondary respondents and archival data.

Findings

SIRMB positively relates to supply-side resilience. Further, SIRMB mediates the positive relationship between range and supply-side resilience, and this relationship is stronger at lower levels of dependence asymmetry. Yet, although dependence asymmetry positively moderates the relationship between range and SIRMB, it negatively moderates the relationship between size and SIRMB. We did not, however, find evidence that size has a conditional indirect effect on supply-side resilience through SIRMB.

Practical implications

Managers in buying firms can incentivise SIRMB to enhance supply-side resilience by developing a diverse rather than a large set of interpersonal relationships with a supplier. This might include allocating particular employees with a wide range of contacts within a supplier to that relationship, while it may be necessary to adopt different networking strategies for different supplier relationships. Firms in a highly asymmetrical relationship may seek to raise supplier expectations about the necessity to initiate risk management behaviour or look to change the dynamic of the relationship by managing contracts for fairness.

Originality/value

New knowledge on SIRMB as a mediating variable underpinning the relationship between interpersonal relationships and supply-side resilience is provided; and empirical evidence on the opposing moderation effect of dependence asymmetry is presented.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Lauren Skinner Beitelspacher, Mert Tokman, Frank G. Adams and R. Glenn Richey

The service‐dominant logic (SDL) concept is reshaping the view of business‐to‐business research and practice. Thus, understanding the role of knowledge‐based operant…

1869

Abstract

Purpose

The service‐dominant logic (SDL) concept is reshaping the view of business‐to‐business research and practice. Thus, understanding the role of knowledge‐based operant resources, a key component of the SDL paradigm, in the ability of supply chains to shape competitive advantage and performance outcomes is vital. Further, operant resources have a hierarchical structure, with differing effects in building value for a supply chain. This research seeks to explore the effects of different levels of hierarchical operant resources in a retail supply chain setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was collected from 300 retailing informants who deal with both key suppliers and customers. The data were examined using hierarchical regression to explore the influence of internal and external operant resources on market performance, subject to the moderating effects of top management support and relationship quality.

Findings

There is a positive relationship between internal and external operant resources with market performance outcomes, but those relationships are subject to support from top management toward retailing supply chain relational initiatives. Thus, intangible, dynamic, customer‐oriented resources play an important role in developing retail supply chains’ ability to achieve a market advantage.

Originality/value

This research addresses a need to explore the implications of SDL in a supply chain context by examining the implications of influences of retailer operant resources on the supplier. Further, this research explores the question of operant resources by analysing those resources at various levels within supply chain relationships.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2007

Patrick K.O. Fung, Ivy S.N. Chen and Leslie S.C. Yip

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of relationship coordination on the performance of trade intermediaries.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of relationship coordination on the performance of trade intermediaries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a model of interfirm governance involving multiple members – customers, suppliers and a firm's internal members. In supply chains involving more than two members, the dyadic approach to studying business relationships is inadequate. Dyadic relationships are often influenced by other connected relationships. Thus, this study provides a broader understanding of relationship management in the supply chain.

Findings

A major task of intermediaries is to facilitate the flow of materials, information and resource along the supply chain. Growth in outsourcing and competition between supply chains have created a need for intermediaries to manage relationships with other members in the supply chain. How should intermediaries manage these relationships for success? Are there positive linkages between supplier relationship management, customer relationship management, intermediary business processes and intermediary performance? The findings of this study will help intermediaries to improve overall performance and to contribute to global trade.

Originality/value

This preliminary study should prompt further investigations into how internal and external relationships can be integrated for superior performance in global trading operations.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Elena Revilla and Desirée Knoppen

There are two major objectives in the research. First, the authors investigate the impact of knowledge integration in terms of joint decision-making and joint…

4487

Abstract

Purpose

There are two major objectives in the research. First, the authors investigate the impact of knowledge integration in terms of joint decision-making and joint sense-making, on relational performance, including operational efficiency and innovation. Second, the authors examine the key antecedents that might facilitate knowledge integration: strategic supply management and trust. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper expands and tests theory drawing upon survey data from 133 buyer-supplier relationships (BSRs). The authors employed a two-step process of analysis to evaluate first the measurement model and then the structural model. The measurement model test built upon confirmatory factor analysis, while the structural model quality test built upon path analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that both integrative mechanisms, joint decision making and joint sense making, affect performance although in different ways. This study also finds that while trust has multiple significant influences and consequently must be viewed as an organizing principle, strategic supply management is required to jointly understand the dynamic and complex context but not to jointly make ongoing decisions.

Research limitations/implications

Three limitations: first, this study was cross-sectional rather than longitudinal. Second, in line with accepted practice, the authors surveyed only one side of the relationship. The suppliers’ viewpoint is thus not fully taken into account. Third, another potential limitation of the study is that the sample stems from just one country and its size does not distinguish subgroups in the analysis of the path model.

Practical implications

Managers should be advised that: first, a trusting partnership built on knowledge integration is a hard order, especially with a new, unknown supplier in a low-cost country, where intellectual property protection is less obvious; second, strategic supply management may not improve cost or operational performance, but in its absence, it is unlikely that a supplier has insight into the exact needs of its buyer and thus, may not add considerable value to their customers; third, building a dynamic knowledge integration capability (valuable, rare, and difficult to imitate) takes time, as does creating reliable learning mechanisms. Joint teams, visit partners’ workplace, early involve suppliers in developing new products or selection of supplier with high-learning capabilities may help to create a knowledge integration capability.

Social implications

The authors suggest that companies should move from an arm-length relationship and turn their supplier relationships into a tool for innovating faster while cutting cost. In order to do this, joint sense-making and joint decision should be seen as institutionalized inter-firm routines rather than ad hoc activities. Thus, the authors recommend managers to proactively build certain knowledge-based capabilities that hinges heavily upon a strategic stance toward supply management and trustful relationships with selected suppliers.

Originality/value

The major intent of this research is to expand understanding of knowledge integration by building a more testable, complex model around its creation. While previous research relied on a configuration approach to explore the relationship between knowledge integration and performance, the authors evaluate causal relationships at the level of the formative dimensions rather than higher order knowledge integration, as this has proven to be a superior analytical method. Second, although supply chain scholars have expressed great interest in trust, an in-depth examination of prior studies in knowledge integration indicate that trust has been analyzed alone. In contrast, the study empirically examines the simultaneous effect of trust and strategic supply management in BSRs.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Ypatia Theodorakioglou, Katerina Gotzamani and George Tsiolvas

The purpose of this article is to focus on dyadic buyer‐supplier relationship as part of supply chain management (SCM) and to relate implementation of supplier management

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to focus on dyadic buyer‐supplier relationship as part of supply chain management (SCM) and to relate implementation of supplier management practices to intra‐firm implementation of quality management (QM) practices. The aim is to identify possible relationships between the two sets of management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in the Greek manufacturing industry, with the use of questionnaires, examining the relationship between supplier management in the SCM context and intra‐firm QM implementation.

Findings

Research findings, which represent buyers' point‐of‐view, reveal a positive correlation between supplier management practices and QM practices, providing an empirical support to the basic research hypothesis.

Research limitations/implications

There was only one respondent in each buyer company. Also, only a mail survey was used as a research technique and only buyers' perspective was reflected in the data. Future research can be based on both buyers' and suppliers' perspective, asking more than one person and using case studies and phone or face‐to‐face interviews.

Practical implications

The study aims to encourage firms to adopt a QM philosophy and implement QM practices in their way to SCM implementation. Quality practices are widely accepted to result in intra‐firm coordination and integration. Given that internal integration is a prerequisite for thorough SCM implementation, QM can serve as a strong base for SCM implementation.

Originality/value

The research verifies that intra‐firm adoption of the quality philosophy can lead firms to better supplier management in the SCM context. Managers should focus on QM in their way to SCM implementation.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 52000