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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Louise Bell, Reva Berman Brown and Barbara Morris

The National Health Service (NHS) has many different kinds ofprofessionals and managers working underneath its large umbrella:non‐clinical managers administer the work of…

466

Abstract

The National Health Service (NHS) has many different kinds of professionals and managers working underneath its large umbrella: non‐clinical managers administer the work of health‐care professionals, who in turn are concerned with the management of patients’ treatments. Delivery of health‐care services involves the managers and professionals working together to achieve a service that is good for, and acceptable to, patients. A change in the philosophy of the NHS is indicated by the growing acceptance, by both managers and professionals, of the necessity to elicit the views of patients (i.e. the expectations and perceptions of service users) and to incorporate these views into the planning and implementation of services. Discusses one such attempt to elicit the perceptions of service users, and reports on the preliminary findings of a patient‐centred audit which has been undertaken in Southend Community Care Services NHS Trust. Discusses the effects that the audit has had on the chiropody services in Southend, for both non‐clinical managers and health‐care professionals, in order to highlight the usefulness of the approach.

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Ana Maria Reis, Ana Pinto Borges and Nuno Araújo

The need to reduce health expenditures raises the discussion on rationing possibilities and there is a growing interest in considering society's perspectives. The aim of…

Abstract

Purpose

The need to reduce health expenditures raises the discussion on rationing possibilities and there is a growing interest in considering society's perspectives. The aim of this paper was to evaluate Portuguese citizens' opinion regarding the imposition of limits on National Health Service (NHS) spending. We also asked who decides how NHS money is spent, in order to obtain the respondents' views on public involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire was used to collect data. Descriptive and inferential statistics, factorial analysis and a logit model were applied.

Findings

Our results showed that most of the respondents believe citizens have low participation on NHS' financial decisions, confirming the lack of public involvement. Health professionals are more likely to agree with limits on NHS spending, which could indicate potential inefficiencies.

Practical implications

From a health policy perspective, we have concluded that different stakeholders should be involved before deciding how public spending limits should be implemented. Health professionals' perspectives should be considered, taking advantage of their experience.

Originality/value

The main novelty of this paper is the evaluation of whether there should be limits on NHS spending, comparing health professionals and non-health professionals.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Rocco Palumbo

Organizational innovation relies on the employees' active participation in improving extant processes and practices. In particular, it has been argued that employees'…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational innovation relies on the employees' active participation in improving extant processes and practices. In particular, it has been argued that employees' engagement triggers innovation-oriented behaviors at work. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of evidence of the implications of work engagement on the health professionals' innovation propensity. The article intends to push forward what we currently know about this issue, providing some food for thought to scholars and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

A path analysis based on ordinary least square (OLS) regression and 10,000 bootstrap samples was designed to investigate the direct and indirect implications of employees' engagement on innovative behaviors at work in a large sample of health professionals operating in Europe. The quality of employee–manager relationships and the organizational climate were included as mediating variables affecting the relationship between work engagement and propensity to innovation-oriented behaviors.

Findings

The research findings highlighted that being engaged at work fosters the willingness of health professionals to partake in the improvement of organizational processes and practices. The positive implications of employees' engagement on innovative behaviors at work are catalyzed by good employee–manager relationships and a positive organizational climate.

Practical implications

Healthcare organizations should uphold the health professional's engagement to enhance their innovation potential. Targeted interventions are needed to merge work engagement with the enhancement of the organizational environment in which health professionals accomplish their activities. A positive organizational climate enacts an empowering work environment, which further incentivizes innovation.

Originality/value

The article adopts a micro-level perspective to investigate the triggers of innovative behaviors among healthcare professionals, providing evidence which is relevant for theory and practice.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2019

Rebecca Sutton and Paul French

The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon experiences of measuring the influences of the Recovery Academy within Greater Manchester Mental Health (GMMH) NHS Foundation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon experiences of measuring the influences of the Recovery Academy within Greater Manchester Mental Health (GMMH) NHS Foundation Trust amongst a student population of health professionals. This paper aims to present considerations for future quantitative research surrounding the efficacy of Recovery Colleges such as the Recovery Academy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilised baseline data collected from health professionals as part of a quantitative evaluation of the Recovery Academy. The paper discusses challenges experienced in measuring change amongst this student population within GMMH.

Findings

Health professionals reported positive attitudes towards recovery at baseline presenting challenges in measuring attitudinal change associated with the Recovery Academy. The experiences of conducting research amongst health professionals within GMMH offers insights into the selection and use of self-report measures in Recovery College research; the representativeness of health professional student populations; and models of course attendance within Recovery Colleges.

Originality/value

The existing literature specific to Recovery College influences upon health professionals remains predominantly qualitative and anecdotal. It is important to gather empirical evidence regarding Recovery Colleges to establish their ability to re-orientate health professionals around principles of recovery. This paper therefore offers considerations for future researchers aiming to gather empirical evidence which may facilitate quantitative evaluations of Recovery Colleges such as the Recovery Academy amongst staff populations.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Sue Holttum

This paper discusses two recent studies of mental health professionals who have experience of mental distress, one in the USA and one in Australia. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses two recent studies of mental health professionals who have experience of mental distress, one in the USA and one in Australia. The purpose of this paper is to highlight different experiences, first of largely concealing their experience, and second of disclosing and using it.

Design/methodology/approach

The Australian study examined the barriers experienced by mental health professionals, including trainees, in relation to seeking help. The USA study reported on a sample of mental health professionals who were doing well, including leaders of services, despite current or past mental distress.

Findings

Both studies included more psychologists than other mental health professionals. Australian mental health professionals reported similar fears and barriers to those found in other studies, in addition to concern about their colleagues’ duty to report impairment to the regulating body. Professionals in the USA-based study were described as potentially helpful in reducing stigma about mental distress because their achievements demonstrated that recovery is possible. However, many of them were also cautious about who they disclosed to, and wanted further reduction in stigma and discrimination.

Originality/value

The Australian study highlighted specifically that the requirement to report impairment to the regulator deterred people from disclosing distress at work, making it less likely that they would get help. The USA-based study was ground-breaking in documenting achievements of a substantial sample of mental health professionals with experience of mental distress. Potentially more professionals being “out and proud” might help increase recovery and social inclusion for service users more generally.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Mehdi Dadkhah, Mohammad Lagzian and Gabriele Santoro

Internet of Things (IoT) as the new technological paradigm has found many applications in different domains. Nowadays, more than 30,000 records related to IoT research can…

Abstract

Purpose

Internet of Things (IoT) as the new technological paradigm has found many applications in different domains. Nowadays, more than 30,000 records related to IoT research can be accessed in Scopus (Scopus.com). Health care is the one of domains which benefits from IoT. However, observations indicate that most active researchers in this area are technical people not health professionals. The purpose of this paper is to understand how health professionals can contribute to the IoT body of knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

IoT professionals are asked to provide their views regarding research concerns, and the collected data are analyzed by phenomenography research methodology.

Findings

Findings indicate that health professionals can contribute through providing information, requirement or standards for developing IoT systems or devices. They can also introduce new applications or domains for which IoT is fit.

Originality/value

This paper tries to fill the gap concerning the lack of attention to undertaking IoT-related research from health professionals’ side and highlights ways that health professionals can contribute IoT body of knowledge.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2020

Lisa Beasley, Sandra Grace and Louise Horstmanshof

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the response and adaption to change of allied health professionals. Understanding how individuals respond and…

1048

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the response and adaption to change of allied health professionals. Understanding how individuals respond and adapt to change is essential to assist leaders to manage transformational change effectively. Contemporary health-care environments are characterised by frequent and rapid change, often with unrealistic and challenging time frames. Individuals operate independently, but also as members of teams, professions and organisations. Therefore, having a sound understanding of individual response to change is important for change leaders. In the Australian context, allied health professionals represent a quarter of the health-care workforce. There is a significant gap in understanding how allied health professionals respond and adapt to change.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review was designed to report on the nature and extent of the literature on the response and adaption to change in the context of allied health professionals. Change leaders in the health-care environment face a number of complex challenges when attempting to facilitate change. While this scoping review did not identify any specific literature on the response and adaption to change of allied health professionals, it did however provide information on change models and factors to take into consideration when implementing a change process.

Findings

The results of this scoping review identified findings in two main areas with regard to response and adaptation of allied health to change: a review of change management literature at the organisation level and change management for allied health. Most of the literature described organisational level change management without providing a structural framework for change. At the professional individual level, the literature focused on specific clinical interventions, rather than on the response and adaption to change for allied health. Minimal literature was identified in regard to the response and adaption to change of allied health professionals. In an environment characterised by continuous change and policy reform, a greater understanding of the response and adaption to change by allied health is a priority for research, policy and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This scoping review was undertaken to explore the response and adaption to change of allied health. It sought to identify the factors that may explain why certain disciplines within the allied health professional group responded to change differently. Scoping reviews do not set out to comprehensively source all relevant literature but rather to ascertain the nature and extent of the published literature in the field. Therefore, it is possible that a systematic review might uncover additional relevant papers. However, this scoping review provides a clear indication of the nature and extent of the literature in allied health.

Practical implications

Social implications

This scoping review will assist change leaders to gain a better understanding of theoretical frameworks of individual, team and organisational change processes and the impacts these have individually and collectively on change processes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this scoping review is the first of its kind to identify the minimal literature available on the way allied health professionals respond and adapt to change.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2018

Catherine Cosgrave, Myfanwy Maple and Rafat Hussain

Some of Australia’s most severe and protracted workforce shortages are in public sector community mental health (CMH) services. Research identifying the factors affecting…

1384

Abstract

Purpose

Some of Australia’s most severe and protracted workforce shortages are in public sector community mental health (CMH) services. Research identifying the factors affecting staff turnover of this workforce has been limited. The purpose of this paper is to identify work factors negatively affecting the job satisfaction of early career health professionals working in rural Australia’s public sector CMH services.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 25 health professionals working in rural and remote CMH services in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, for NSW Health participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The study identified five work-related challenges negatively affecting job satisfaction: developing a profession-specific identity; providing quality multidisciplinary care; working in a resource-constrained service environment; working with a demanding client group; and managing personal and professional boundaries.

Practical implications

These findings highlight the need to provide time-critical supports to address the challenges facing rural-based CMH professionals in their early career years in order to maximise job satisfaction and reduce avoidable turnover.

Originality/value

Overall, the study found that the factors negatively affecting the job satisfaction of early career rural-based CMH professionals affects all professionals working in rural CMH, and these negative effects increase with service remoteness. For those in early career, having to simultaneously deal with significant rural health and sector-specific constraints and professional challenges has a negative multiplier effect on their job satisfaction. It is this phenomenon that likely explains the high levels of job dissatisfaction and turnover found among Australia’s rural-based early career CMH professionals. By understanding these multiple and simultaneous pressures on rural-based early career CMH professionals, public health services and governments involved in addressing rural mental health workforce issues will be better able to identify and implement time-critical supports for this cohort of workers. These findings and proposed strategies potentially have relevance beyond Australia’s rural CMH workforce to Australia’s broader early career nursing and allied health rural workforce as well as internationally for other countries that have a similar physical geography and health system.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 December 2010

Gayatri Nambiar‐Greenwood

When a student chooses a career, they already have views/stereotypes about what that role constitutes. This also applies to students who choose a career in any health

Abstract

When a student chooses a career, they already have views/stereotypes about what that role constitutes. This also applies to students who choose a career in any health profession. This theoretical paper likens mental health to a threshold concept within interprofessional learning and, with it, the act of engaging in learning together as 'troublesome knowledge', which challenges their originally held notion of what it is to be a health professional both positively and negatively. It is felt that, although the development of professional identity remains progressively evolutionary through one's career, this paper intends to consider the journey of ‘troublesome knowledge’ for the health professional student appreciating mental health within interprofessional learning as a necessary challenge, in order to rediscover the true meaning of being a health professional. Challenging the previously held assumptions of the health professional students and their professional acquisition of knowledge about their chosen career and understanding of mental health is not only important to develop their skills within a varied team, but vital to the centrality of the patient.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

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