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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Diana Barron and Angela Hassiotis

There is now a vast amount of available information, research and policy on the transition of young people with learning disabilities to adulthood. These sources are…

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Abstract

There is now a vast amount of available information, research and policy on the transition of young people with learning disabilities to adulthood. These sources are informed by different professional philosophies and practices, resulting in a heterogeneous mass of data that can be confusing, contradictory and repetitive. In this review we provide an overview of recent publications about services for young people with learning disabilities at the time of transition, with particular focus on those with mental disorders including neurodevelopment disorders and/or challenging behaviour. We discuss their relevance to good practice and the implications for the future development of services for people with learning disabilities in the UK. We argue that, despite the qualitative differences between the experience of transition to adulthood for young people with learning disabilities and that of other young people, the principles of service provision remain the same. Developments in research and clinical practice in this field ought to reflect good practice, as well as embracing new methodologies, and benefit from advances in adolescents without learning disabilities.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Jackie Wales, Nicola Brewin, Karima Susi, Alison Eivors, Debbie Whight and Rheanne Leatherland

There is a dearth of research on what constitutes effective transfer of care from children’s and young people services to adult services for patients with eating disorders…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a dearth of research on what constitutes effective transfer of care from children’s and young people services to adult services for patients with eating disorders (EDs) in the UK. Transition has implications for continuity of care and particularly for early intervention which has the best prognosis. The purpose of this paper is to understand the experience of transition and identify facilitators and barriers to this.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methodology was used. Focus groups (n = 4) were held with clinicians (n = 22) working in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services or adult ED services. Individual interviews were conducted with patients (n = 5) who had commenced/completed transition to adult services and with parents/carers (n = 6) of patients invited for interview.

Findings

A number of factors may facilitate or impede transition and can be grouped into the broad themes of communication, managing the differences between services and timing of transition. Improvements in communication, clear explanation of service differences and flexibility around the timing of transitions may enhance the experience for patients and parents/carers.

Research limitations/implications

The service evaluation was limited to transition between two specialist ED services in one geographical location. The findings provide the basis for a wider research study to examine which factors are most important when planning transition from the perspectives of patients, parents/carers and clinicians.

Originality/value

This is the first study examining ED transitions in the UK. It provides valuable insight of the experience of service users and carers and highlights potential improvements when planning transitions for this patient group.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2011

Susan Clarke, Patricia Sloper, Nicola Moran, Linda Cusworth, Anita Franklin and Jennifer Beecham

Drawing on a wider study about the effectiveness and costs of different models of multi‐agency transition services, this paper aims to present new evidence on the ways in…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on a wider study about the effectiveness and costs of different models of multi‐agency transition services, this paper aims to present new evidence on the ways in which such services meet the priorities and concerns of young people identified in previous research.

Design/methodology/approach

The evidence is based on qualitative interviews with 130 managers and staff in five transition services across England, and a quantitative survey of parents and young people receiving these services (pre‐transition), or having received the services in the last‐two years (post‐transition). In total, 110 pre‐transition and 33 post‐transition parents, and 73 pre‐transition and 24 post‐transition young people, completed questionnaires. Statistical analysis included calculating frequencies and mean values for the responses that measured met and unmet need, and qualitative results were analysed thematically. The consequence of, and reasons for, the low response rate to the family survey are also discussed.

Findings

The research found examples of good practice and innovative services to meet young people's needs. However, provision of such services was patchy, and unmet need for transition support remained high in all the priority areas studied both during and after transition: ranging from 52 to 84 per cent in parent reports and 59 to 82 per cent in young people's reports.

Originality/value

With the onset of public service cutbacks, the paper concludes that improved multi‐agency commissioning of services, based on the priorities and concerns of disabled young people, and greater engagement of transition services with a broader range of agencies, will help to address these deficiencies.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2011

Axel Kaehne

Transitions for young people with intellectual disabilities have received much attention from researchers. Little is known, however, about how mental health services link…

Abstract

Transitions for young people with intellectual disabilities have received much attention from researchers. Little is known, however, about how mental health services link with existing transition partnerships and what the potential service gaps are for young people with intellectual disabilities. Eight mental health professionals in three local authorities in Wales were interviewed to sketch potential research themes in this area. Our findings revealed a remarkable lack of engagement of mental health professionals with transition partnerships for young people with intellectual disabilities, and significant service gaps. The insufficient integration of mental health services in transition planning may contribute to disruptive transitions for young people with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Further research should examine how best to involve mental health services in transition partnerships for young people.

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Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Christy M. Borders, Marcus Daczewitz and Kristi M. Probst

Transition is an important and ongoing aspect of life that everyone experiences. For students who are deaf/hard of hearing (d/DHH) and their families, transitions related…

Abstract

Transition is an important and ongoing aspect of life that everyone experiences. For students who are deaf/hard of hearing (d/DHH) and their families, transitions related to education can be daunting and, at times, confusing. This chapter will focus on three important educational transitions: early intervention, school age, and adulthood. For each transitional period, recommendations for best practices are made. Additionally, this chapter will discuss the importance of transition planning and supports over time. Overall, communication between service providers, families, and the student is a key element to making these transitions smooth and successful.

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Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Eugene F. Asola and Samuel R. Hodge

The percentage of North Americans who have one or more physical disabilities continues to rise. Specifically, the percentage of people with ambulatory disabilities…

Abstract

The percentage of North Americans who have one or more physical disabilities continues to rise. Specifically, the percentage of people with ambulatory disabilities, cognitive disabilities, and other health impairments is increasing every year. This phenomenon calls for pragmatic measures to help provide better transition and related services to students with physical disabilities and other health impairments. It is anticipated that well-planned collaborative transition services provided to students with physical disabilities and other health impairments will result in improved quality of life and independent living in the community. In this chapter, we discuss transition and transition-related services, supporting legislation for persons with disabilities, transition from rehabilitation centers and hospitals to job settings and community-based programs.

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Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Maria Iakovina Livanou, Rebecca Lane, Sophie D'Souza and Swaran P. Singh

There is substantial evidence that young people moving from child and adolescent mental health services to adult services are more likely to experience poor transitions

Abstract

Purpose

There is substantial evidence that young people moving from child and adolescent mental health services to adult services are more likely to experience poor transitions. However, little is known about the care pathways of young people transitioning from forensic services. This retrospective case note review sought to examine the clinical characteristics, transition pathways and psychosocial indicators of transition outcomes amongst young people in forensic medium secure services discharged to adult services.

Design/methodology/approach

The electronic records of 32 young people, who transitioned from six adolescent medium secure units in England to adult services between May 2015 and June 2016, were examined.

Findings

Approximately 65% of young people were between 18 and 19 years at the time of transition and the average waiting time from referral to discharge was six months. A total of 63% young people transitioned to community placements and adult medium secure services. Four pathways describing the journey into and out of adolescent medium secure services were identified in a subsample of 12 young people. A total of 25% young people with neurodevelopmental problems moved to specialist services.

Practical implications

The results suggest that diagnosis, severity of offence and clinical background are associated with transition pathway. Promoting a person-centred approach and gradual independence of the young person may improve current practice.

Originality/value

These results inform existing policy and clinical practice in an effort to reform transition guidelines around young people’s needs during transition times. Further studies in adolescent forensic services are needed to understand complex neurodevelopmental problems and comorbidities.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Juliette van der Kamp

The purpose of this paper is to describe the barriers and facilitators to an effective transition from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to Adult Mental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the barriers and facilitators to an effective transition from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to Adult Mental Health Services (AMHS). It also presents a new entry into considering how the transition can be improved.

Design/methodology/approach

Insights into the transition from CAMHS to AMHS were gathered through eight semi-structured interviews with mental health professionals. Two methods of data analysis were employed to explore the emerging themes in the data and the observed deficit approach to organisational development.

Findings

The findings identified a vast volume of barriers in comparison to facilitators to the transition. Adolescents who transition from CAMHS to AMHS initially experience difficulty adapting to the differences in the services due to the short duration of the transition period. However, despite the established barriers to the transition, adolescents tend to adapt to the differences between the services. Findings also showed a negative framing towards the transition amongst the mental health professionals which resembles a deficit approach to organisational development.

Originality/value

This paper explores mental health professionals’ perspectives regarding the transition in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. The transition is increasingly recognised as an area in health care that requires improvement. This research provides a new way to consider the transition by exploring the perceived deficit approach to organisational development in the services.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Maria I. Livanou, Vivek Furtado and Swaran P. Singh

This paper provides an overview of transitions across forensic child and adolescent mental health services in England and Wales. The purpose of this paper is to delineate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides an overview of transitions across forensic child and adolescent mental health services in England and Wales. The purpose of this paper is to delineate the national secure services system for young people in contact with the youth justice system.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews findings from the existing literature of transitions across forensic child and adolescent mental health services, drawing attention to present facilitators and barriers to optimal transition. The authors examine the infrastructure of current services and highlight gaps between child and adult service continuity and evaluate the impact of poor transitions on young offenders’ mental health and wellbeing.

Findings

Young offenders experience a broad range of difficulties, from the multiple interfaces with the legal system, untreated mental health problems, and poor transition to adult services. Barriers such as long waiting lists, lack of coordination between services and lack of transition preparation impede significantly smooth transitions.

Research limitations/implications

The authors need to develop, test and evaluate models of transitional care that improve mental health and wellbeing of this group.

Practical implications

Mapping young offenders’ care pathway will help to understand their needs and also to impact current policy and practice. Key workers in forensic services should facilitate the transition process by developing sustainable relationships with the young person and creating a safe clinical environment.

Originality/value

Transition of care from forensic child and adolescent mental health services is a neglected area. This paper attempts to highlight the nature and magnitude of the problems at the transition interface in a forensic context.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Heiko Gebauer and Thomas Friedli

This paper attempts to provide a better understanding of behavioral processes and their impact on the transition from products to services.

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5461

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to provide a better understanding of behavioral processes and their impact on the transition from products to services.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies are the main tool of theory development. The paper focuses mainly on German and Swiss product manufacturers, whose products require a high level of customer investment.

Findings

The objective was merely to explain behavioral dimension of transition. The paper indicated seven behavioral processes which play a critical role during the transition. Managerial service awareness and role understanding, as well as employee service awareness and role understanding seem to be the right triggers to change the behavioral processes in the desired manner.

Research limitations/implications

The main focus was on the German and Swiss machinery and medical equipment manufacturing industries, and the remarks are limited to these sectors.

Practical implications

The key managerial implications and recommendations can be formulated as follows: establish a “value‐added” managerial service awareness; change managerial role understanding – from traditional customer support to business manager; establish a “value‐added” employee service awareness; and change employee role understanding – from selling products to providing services.

Originality/value

The authors were able to add a complementary perspective to existing literature on the transition process from products to services. For service management theorists, it is suggested that the transition from product manufacturers into service providers is influenced strongly by several behavioral processes. A complete theory of the transition process requires an interdisciplinary theory that integrates service management and human decision making.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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