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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1992

Dale S. Rogers, Patricia J. Daugherty and Theodore P. Stank

Reports a recent survey of warehousing firms which examined theextent of involvement in electronic data interchange (EDI) and theimpact which EDI has had on the firms 

Abstract

Reports a recent survey of warehousing firms which examined the extent of involvement in electronic data interchange (EDI) and the impact which EDI has had on the firms′ operations and service capabilities. Warehousing firms providing EDI services to their customers were found to be better able to accommodate selected customers′ requests than firms not providing EDI services. Additionally, the firms providing EDI service were offering more services to their customers than firms not providing EDI service. Based on the research results, EDI firms appear to be more flexible and more responsive to customer requests. EDI offers significant potential for helping firms to gain competitive advantage and enhance customer responsiveness.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Brendan J. Gray, Sheelagh Matear and Philip K. Matheson

Although there are a growing number of studies which have investigated links between market orientation and performance in service firms, there has been limited research…

Abstract

Although there are a growing number of studies which have investigated links between market orientation and performance in service firms, there has been limited research which compares the market orientations of goods and service firms. The results of this study, based on a large multi‐industry sample of New Zealand companies, suggest that to improve business performance service firms should develop information systems to track profitable customers and products, develop a corporate culture which emphasises the needs of stakeholders, and develop policies to encourage ethical conduct. To improve marketing performance firms should improve their levels of market orientation, develop a corporate culture which emphasises the marketing concept and innovation, adopt more proficient new product development processes and explore the possibilities of electronic commerce.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

A. Parasuraman

This paper argues that a genuinely customer‐oriented organizational culture is a prerequisite if service firms are to excel in the marketplace. It presents several traits…

Abstract

This paper argues that a genuinely customer‐oriented organizational culture is a prerequisite if service firms are to excel in the marketplace. It presents several traits or values representing such a culture and discusses the importance of those values by linking them to unique features of the nature and delivery of services. The paper also addresses problems and prospects associated with developing a customer‐oriented culture, and it concludes with implications for services marketing practitioners and researchers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Magdy S. Farag and Rafik Z. Elias

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of public accounting firms' mix of service revenue on their average productivity measured by total revenue per partner.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of public accounting firms' mix of service revenue on their average productivity measured by total revenue per partner.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from Public Accounting Report on top public accounting firms by revenue, an OLS regression model is applied by regressing revenue per partner on the percentage of revenue generated from auditing and attest, tax, management consulting, and other services independently.

Findings

Results show that the proportion of auditing and attest service revenue is negatively associated with public accounting firms' productivity. However, the proportion of other services revenue, other than tax and management consulting services, is positively associated with productivity. Additional investigation shows that if public accounting firms provide other services in their mix of services, then tax and management consulting services do not contribute to these public accounting firms' productivity.

Research limitations/implications

Results of this study cannot be generalized beyond the top 100 public accounting firms, and the measurement of revenue per partner ignores the exact number of partners within different service areas.

Practical implications

Although auditing and attest services are considered core services of public accounting firms, they do not increase the productivity of the firm.

Originality/value

This study helps in assessing whether average productivity of public accounting firms is affected by the proportion of a specific type of service in the post‐SOX era.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Niron Hashai

The chapter investigates the determinants of the extent of foreign services multinationals originating SMOPECs. An inverted U-shaped relationship between the level of…

Abstract

The chapter investigates the determinants of the extent of foreign services multinationals originating SMOPECs. An inverted U-shaped relationship between the level of technological knowledge and extent of foreign services provision is found, stemming from the facilitating and inhibiting effects of technological knowledge on foreign services provision. Standardization of services and their automation positively moderates this relationship. Overall, the chapter highlights the increased importance of relatively small global service providers from SMOPECs as a new type of multinational that is likely increase in its dominancy in the near future.

Details

The Future of Foreign Direct Investment and the Multinational Enterprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-555-7

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Ruth N. Bolton and Crina O. Tarasi

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Bryane Michael, Joseph Falzon and Ajay Shamdasani

This paper aims to derive the conditions under which a financial services firm will want to hire a compliance services company and show how much money they should spend.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to derive the conditions under which a financial services firm will want to hire a compliance services company and show how much money they should spend.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a mathematical model to show the intuition behind many of the compliance decisions that cost financial services firms billions every year.

Findings

This paper finds that hiring compliance firms may save banks and brokerages money. However, their advice may lead to an embarrass de riches – whereby the lower compliance costs and higher profit advantages they confer may lead to more regulation. Regulators may furthermore tighten regulation – with the expectation that financial service firms will adapt somehow. This paper presents a fresh perspective on the Menon hypothesis, deriving conditions under which financial regulations help the competitiveness of an international financial centre.

Research limitations/implications

The paper represents one of the first and only models of compliance spending by financial services firms.

Practical implications

This paper provides five potential policy responses for dealing with ever ratcheting financial regulations.

Originality/value

The paper hopefully launches literature on the compliance service industry – and the buy-or-do decision to engage in financial services compliance. This paper finds that efficient compliance can hurt firms, by encouraging regulation. This paper shows how firms can forestall the extra regulation that comes with easier internet and computerised monitoring.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2010

Tim Kessler and Michael Stephan

As an answer for the limited growth potentials of diversification and internationalization, services became increasingly important for industrial firms in recent years…

Abstract

As an answer for the limited growth potentials of diversification and internationalization, services became increasingly important for industrial firms in recent years. Based on existing and established business concepts, companies explore new segments in their traditional value chains beyond traditional market penetration strategies: they pursue service transition strategies to open up new sources for growth, even in markets that do not promise great expansion potential. Our paper addresses the issue of economies of scope of service transition. In this context, we first explore the question, to what extent the insights about product diversification strategies from physical goods sectors can be transferred to the service sector. Using competence-based considerations on diversification we focus on dynamic economies of scope, whose central idea is exploration and development of new resources rather than the static exploitation of existing ones. Furthermore, we integrate the largely neglected issue of how the phenomenon of service diversification depends on the industry's life cycle stage. In a small empirical study of the German mechanical engineering industry we demonstrate that diversification steps into services require a shift in the resource and competence base of firms. Using a dynamic perspective, we construct a conceptual framework for analyzing and explaining the advantages of service transition strategies. The developed model describes a service diversification trajectory and points out that the establishment of a profitable service business requires the exploration and development of competences and adequate organizational structures.

Details

Enhancing Competences for Competitive Advantage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-877-9

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2006

Mark Freel

Though KIBS constitute only a small proportion of all services, researchers frequently accord them a significance beyond that indicated by their share in employment or…

Abstract

Though KIBS constitute only a small proportion of all services, researchers frequently accord them a significance beyond that indicated by their share in employment or value added (Tether & Hipp, 2002; Gallouj, 2002). For example, KIBS are held to play ‘an increasingly dynamic and pivotal role in ‘new’ knowledge-based economies’ (Howells, 2000, p. 4), as sources of important new technologies, high-quality, high-wage employment and wealth creation (Tether, 2004). Unfortunately, while much of the rhetoric seems intuitively reasonable, one inevitably encounters definitional difficulties in delimiting the specifics of innovation in KIBS, with a variety of, more or less operational, working definitions employed by the academic literature (Wong & He, 2005).

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Entrepreneurship: Frameworks And Empirical Investigations From Forthcoming Leaders Of European Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-428-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Yapu Zhao, Dong Liu, Wenhong Zhang and Silei Chen

This paper aims to investigate how top management service commitment (TSC) affects two dimensions of new product development (NPD), speed and product innovativeness, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how top management service commitment (TSC) affects two dimensions of new product development (NPD), speed and product innovativeness, and to examine how dysfunctional competition moderates the effects in emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 151 high-tech manufacturing firms in China. In one firm, two different top managers were surveyed to reduce the common method variance. The authors used the seemingly unrelated regression approach to test the hypotheses.

Findings

First, TSC negatively influences product innovativeness, an effect that dysfunctional competition attenuates. Second, despite not being significantly positive as hypothesized, the direct effect of TSC on NPD speed remains positive when dysfunctional competition is high rather than low. Third, the findings reveal that product innovativeness increases firm performance, but NPD speed shows no similar effect.

Practical implications

First, top managers should pay attention to the synergistic effect between industrial services and product businesses. Second, manufacturing firms in developing countries need to implement servitization when facing unlawful competitive behaviors.

Originality/value

In literature, the effect of industrial services on NPD is unclear. The present study enriches literature by connecting servitization with NPD and by focusing on the importance of top managers to the implementation of servitization. In addition, the authors extend the servitization literature to emerging economies and thereby provide significant insights into this context.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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